theosophy

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n theosophy a system of belief based on mystical insight into the nature of God and the soul
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Theosophy Any system of philosophy or mysticism which proposes to attain intercourse with God and superior spirits, and consequent superhuman knowledge, by physical processes, as by the theurgic operations of some ancient Platonists, or by the chemical processes of the German fire philosophers; also, a direct, as distinguished from a revealed, knowledge of God, supposed to be attained by extraordinary illumination; especially, a direct insight into the processes of the divine mind, and the interior relations of the divine nature.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n theosophy Knowledge of things divine; a philosophy based upon a claim of special insight into the divine nature, or a special divine revelation. It differs from most philosophical systems in that they start from phenomena and deduce therefrom certain conclusions concerning God, whereas theosophy starts with an assumed knowledge of God, directly obtained, through spiritual intercommunion, and proceeds therefrom to a study and explanation of phenomena.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Theosophy thē-os′ō-fi immediate divine illumination or inspiration claimed to be possessed by specially gifted men, who also possess abnormal control over natural forces
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. knowledge of things divine, fr. wise in the things of God; God + wise: cf. F. théosophie,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. theōsophiatheos, God, sophia, wisdom.

Usage

In literature:

Presently Mr. Sinnett came to London, and gave us lectures in drawing-rooms on Theosophy.
"The Arena" by Various
Failing him, the representative of God is he who is complete in theosophy without possessing any philosophy at all.
"Mystics and Saints of Islam" by Claud Field
The voice of Theosophy has been heard in favor of downing the gallows.
"The Shadow On The Dial, and Other Essays" by Ambrose Bierce
Baader's philosophy is thus essentially a theosophy.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1" by Various
The objects of Theosophy are said to be three: (1) The establishment of a universal brotherhood.
"India, Its Life and Thought" by John P. Jones
Theosophy, rightly interpreted, is in no sense antagonistic, but, rather, supplemental to Christianity.
"Italy, the Magic Land" by Lilian Whiting
But theosophy is, primarily, a school of good manners.
"The Paliser case" by Edgar Saltus
Very likely they have started Theosophy, in order to provide themselves with fresh residences.
"Flowers of Freethought" by George W. Foote
The glamour of Coleridge's theosophy never seems to have fascinated Hazlitt's stubborn intellect.
"Hours in a Library" by Leslie Stephen
We learned that the apostle of theosophy was indeed present.
"The International Spy" by Allen Upward
And so does Spiritism, Theosophy, Mormonism and other cults.
"Studies in Prophecy" by Arno C. Gaebelein
The initiate learned the theosophy of the soul, its cycles and career.
"Historia Amoris: A History of Love, Ancient and Modern" by Edgar Saltus
She believes thoroughly in spiritualism, theosophy, and astrology.
"Famous Singers of To-day and Yesterday" by Henry C. Lahee
See also the article THEOSOPHY.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Slice 1" by Various
Imagine Mariposilla developing the occult transitions of theosophy.
"Mariposilla" by Mary Stewart Daggett
But the whole subject of Theosophy is to me a perpetual puzzle.
"The Wanderings of a Spiritualist" by Arthur Conan Doyle
How are you on theosophy?
"Cape of Storms" by Percival Pollard
The Oriental theosophy had attracted and delighted her without altogether convincing her.
"The Way of Initiation" by Rudolf Steiner
She had tried spiritualism and theosophy.
"Confessions of a Young Lady" by Richard Marsh
He attacked a definite theology, not a theosophy.
"Voltaire" by John Morley
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