tabor pipe

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n tabor pipe a small fipple flute that is played with the left hand while the right hand is free to beat a tabor
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

Be you there also, Trudon, said he to his drummer, with your pipe and tabor.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
Our music consisted of two fiddles, with a pipe and tabor.
"The Vicar of Wakefield" by Oliver Goldsmith
Be you there also, Trudon, said he to his drummer, with your pipe and tabor.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book IV." by Francois Rabelais
The lord's music, consisting of a tabor and pipe, is employed to conduct the dance.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 13, Issue 372, Saturday, May 30, 1829" by Various
Blow, Infants, blow the pipe, and thump the tabor, In honour of the hero's Thirteenth Labour!
"Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 102, April 2, 1892" by Various
In the momentary silence that ensued the blithe jingling of bells was heard, accompanied by the merry sound of tabor and pipe.
"The Lancashire Witches" by William Harrison Ainsworth
Philip took his pipe and tabor and they all marched together towards the whitewashed cottage.
"Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12)" by Various
The tabor and pipe, in the servant's first speech, were common popular instruments.
"Shakespeare and Music" by Edward W. Naylor
On the north side are to be found: (1) Angel with pipe and tabor; another censing.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Abbey Church of Tewkesbury" by H. J. L. J. Massé
This dance is commonly performed to the pipe and tabor.
"A Treatise on the Art of Dancing" by Giovanni-Andrea Gallini
And they loved dancing with the girls to the music of pipe and tabor.
"The History of London" by Walter Besant
A much simpler instrument known as the tabor pipe {85} was in general use in the twelfth century.
"Springtime and Other Essays" by Francis Darwin
We nowadays put the pipe before the tabor, but in Shakespearian days this was not so.
"Rustic Sounds and Other Studies in Literature and Natural History" by Francis Darwin
Youths, in red and purple jerkins, frisked as they played the pipe and tabor.
"John Marchmont's Legacy, Volumes I-III" by Mary E. Braddon
As it approached nearer, she knew that it was Philip playing upon his pipe and tabor.
"The Parent's Assistant" by Maria Edgeworth
One of them blows a trumpet, and another plays on a tabor and pipe.
"The Dance of Death" by Francis Douce
They had come to the assembly as to a holiday, with their wives and provisions, their pipes and tabors.
"The Mercenary" by W. J. Eccott
***

In poetry:

As a happy people come,
So came they,
As a happy people come
When the war has roll'd away,
With dance and tabor, pipe and drum,
And all make holiday.
"A Chanted Calendar" by Sydney Thompson Dobell
Then, why should I give way to grief?
Come, strike up pipe and tabor
He that affecteth God in chief,
And as himself his neighbour,
May still enjoy a happy life,
Although he lives by labor.
"The Contented Man's Morice" by George Wither
Who thinks Hugues wrote for the deaf,
Proved a mere mountain in labour?
Better submit; try again; what's the clef?
'Faith, 'tis no trifle for pipe and for tabor—-
Four flats, the minor in F.
"Master Hugues Of Saxe-Gotha" by Robert Browning