submarine

Definitions

  • A BRITISH SUBMARINE DETAILED FOR INSTRUCTION OF MERCHANT OFFICERS
    A BRITISH SUBMARINE DETAILED FOR INSTRUCTION OF MERCHANT OFFICERS
  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj submarine beneath the surface of the sea
    • v submarine attack by submarine "The Germans submarined the Allies"
    • v submarine control a submarine
    • v submarine bring down with a blow to the legs
    • v submarine throw with an underhand motion
    • v submarine move forward or under in a sliding motion "The child was injured when he submarined under the safety belt of the car"
    • n submarine a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes
    • n submarine a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments); different names are used in different sections of the United States
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Additional illustrations & photos:

INSTRUCTIONAL ANTI-SUBMARINE COURSE FOR MERCHANT OFFICERS AT GLASGOW INSTRUCTIONAL ANTI-SUBMARINE COURSE FOR MERCHANT OFFICERS AT GLASGOW
Section of the Goubet Submarine Boat Section of the Goubet Submarine Boat

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In World War II, the German submarine U-120 was sunk by a malfunctioning toilet
    • Submarine A submarine sandwich.
    • Submarine A stowaway on a seagoing vessel.
    • Submarine (Nav.) A submarine boat; a ship that can travel under the surface of the water. Most such ships are ships of war, as part of a navy, but submarines are also used for oceanic research. Also called sub and (from the German U-Boot U-boat.
    • n Submarine A submarine plant or animal.
    • Submarine a water-tight dress or covering for a diver. See under Submarine.
    • a Submarine Being, acting, or growing, under water in the sea; as, submarine navigators; submarine plants.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The 1st nuclear-powered submarine, the Nautilus, commissioned by the United States Navy in 1954, made her maiden voyage on Jan. 17, 1955.
    • submarine Situated or living under or in the sea, either at the bottom or below the surface; below the surface of the sea: as, submarine plants; a submarine telegraph.
    • submarine Occurring or carried on below the surface of the sea: as, submarine explorations; designed for use under the sea: as, submarine armor.
    • submarine A submarine plant.
    • n submarine A vessel designed to navigate either entirely under water or on the surface, with a crew contained within it and with its own motive power; specifically, a submarine torpedo-boat. The earliest submarine boats were moved by rowers in the interior, and descriptions of such boats are given in the seventeenth century. Numerous inventors have designed and built such boats, among them Bushnell and Fulton, but the first use of a submarine in actual warfare appears to have been during the American civil war. The Confederates built several boats called ‘Davids,’ one of which torpedoed the United States steamer Housatonic in 1864. Since then a number of submarine boats of various types have been constructed, but it was not until their construction was taken up in France about 1885 that such vessels began to be considered of real importance in naval warfare. Since then, the development of the submarine under the direction of the French Naval Administration has been continuous. In the United States, the Navy Department has adopted the type of boat developed by John P. Holland, of which 8 have been built and are in service (see cut); 4 improved submarines are under construction. Another type of boat has been invented by Simon Lake. In Great Britain, the boats first built were of the Holland type, which has since been developed further in that country. (See table showing submarines built and building in various navies under navy.) In all modern submarines, the boat, when under water, is propelled by an electric motor, the current for which is derived from storage-batteries. The means of propulsion at the surface are various: steam-engines and boilers fired with coke and with oil fuel have been used, and gasolene and petroleum engines are largely employed. The engines are also geared to electric generators in the boat, by means of which the storage-batteries can be recharged. In the smallest types of submarines electric propulsion is employed, both at the surface and beneath it, and the storage-batteries must be charged from shore or from another vessel. In the navigation of submarines, three conditions are recognized: the light condition, when all the water-ballast is pumped out, hatches are open, and the vessel is propelled substantially as an ordinary boat; the awash condition, when only the conning-tower is above water and the hatches and other openings are closed; the submerged condition, when the boat is wholly under water except that the periscope may show at moderate depths of submergence. The passage from the light to the awash condition is effected by filling suitably arranged ballast-tanks with water. The total submergence and the regulation of the depth when submerged are now usually effected by a horizontal rudder (which see) at the stem, by which the vessel is inclined downward when under way and dives beneath the surface. In the Lake boat. so-called hydroplanes are used. These consist of a pair of horizontal rudders, forward and aft, on each Bide of the boat which, when inclined under way, cause the boat to submerge bodily. Screw-propellers on a vertical axis have also been need. The only offensive weapon carried by submarines at present is the automobile torpedo. Distinctions have been drawn between various types of submarines, as the submersible or autonomous submarine boat, also called offensive submarine; and the submarine proper, or defensive submarine. See submersible.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The lowest point that a person can reach on Earth, outside of riding a submarine or going down a mine shaft, is where the Jordan River enters the Dead Sea. It's 1,290 feet below sea level.
    • adj Submarine sub-ma-rēn′ under, or in, the sea
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Quotations

  • Edsger W. Dijkstra
    Edsger W. Dijkstra
    “The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.”
  • J. William Fulbright
    J.%20William%20Fulbright
    “In the long course of history, having people who understand your thought is much greater security than another submarine.”

Usage

In literature:

A collision while underseas in a submarine is a serious matter.
"The Heads of Apex" by Francis Flagg
The first boat described is a submarine.
"Boys' Book of Model Boats" by Raymond Francis Yates
The submarine had heretofore been an untried form of war craft.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume III (of VIII)" by Various
They bombarded the submarine plant at Hoboken, a suburb.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume IV (of 8)"
She was commonly believed to have been the victim of a submarine.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 8)"
Only one case of a submarine fighting and destroying another submarine became known.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume VI (of VIII)" by Various
From the island of the submarine we were transported on a small cruiser to the distant Isle of Shador.
"The Gods of Mars" by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Had the submarine's crew been killed before he'd even read of her disappearance?
"Under Arctic Ice" by H.G. Winter
His Good Samaritan ship was sunk by a German submarine on her return trip, but fortunately the philanthropist was not on her.
"Herbert Hoover" by Vernon Kellogg
When they reached their destination on the shore of the Sound a small submarine, which Dirk had ordered by radio, was awaiting them.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science, March 1930" by Various
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In poetry:

It was a British ship of war
Was swiftly drawing near,
For she had heard of a submarine
Was lurking off Cape Clear
"The Ballad Of The Dinkinbar" by Cicely Fox Smith
We do not fear the submarines
That plough the troubled foam;
We scorn the ugly old machines -
And safely stay at home!
"Pacifist War Song - 1917" by Howard Phillips Lovecraft
America screamed
The lion roared
They leaped at each other
America desperate to win
Fighting with bombs, flamethrowers,
knives forks submarines.
"Making The Lion For All It's Got -- A Ballad" by Allen Ginsberg
Above our submarine's black nose she rises -
That Venus, which is like no other star!
We men, long missing out on girls' caresses,
Await her like a woman from afar.
""Above our submarine's black nose she rises ..."" by Konstantin Simonov
And skill is yours, with patience won
And labour neither brief nor light --
No novice aimed the blinding gun
That reft the submarine of sight --
Honoured of England let him be
As Robin Hood of gunnery.
"To the Crew of the H.M.S. BIRMINGHAM" by Robert Henry Forster
A bit west the Scillies the sky was stormy red;
"Tonight we'll lift Saint Agnes Light if all goes well," we said;
But we met a slinkin' submarine as dark was comin' down,
An' she ripped our rotten plates away an' left us there to drown.
"The Ballad Of The Resurrection Packet" by Cicely Fox Smith

In news:

Fire breaks out on submarine.
The director of "Titanic," "Avatar" and other films used a specially designed submarine to dive nearly seven miles.
Pop art icon Peter Max talks about the Yellow Submarine controversy, breakfasting with Jimi Hendrix and Bob Dylan, and his new Masters Series.
Navy To Name Submarine After Jimmy Carter (04-08-98).
The US Navy on Monday officially named one of its new Seawolf class submarines for former President Jimmy Carter.
The Type VII U-boat was the most numerous submarine ever and a workhorse of the Kriegsmarine throughout World War II.
A US Navy submarine and Aegis cruiser were damaged in a collision on Saturday off the East Coast.
(AP) — The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser off the East Coast.
(AP) — The Navy submarine and the Aegis cruiser that collided off the East Coast are both back in port and officials are investigating what went wrong, the Pentagon said late Sunday.
Submarine, Aegis cruiser collide off East Coast.
The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an.
The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser off the East Coast.
The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser during routine operations at an undisclosed location.
(AP) — The Pentagon says it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser during routine operations at an undisclosed location.
Navy submarine, Aegis cruiser collide during routine operations.
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In science:

Zumberge et al., Submarine measurement of the newtonian gravitational constant, Phys.
New Regions for a Chameleon to Hide
In fact, even submarine mounds seen today are invariably porous (Marteinsson et al. 2001; Kelley et al. 2005).
Magnetism, FeS colloids, and Origins of Life
Also, the sulphide comprising what is now pyrite (FeS2 ) in the 350 million year old submarine Irish deposits (Fig.3) was derived through bacterial sulfate reduction in somewhat alkaline and saline seawater while the iron was contributed by exhaling acidic hydothermal solutions.
Magnetism, FeS colloids, and Origins of Life
Marteinsson VTh, Kristj´ansson JK, Kristmannsd¨ottir H et al. (2001) Discovery of giant submarine smectite cones on the seafloor in Eyjafjordur, Northern Iceland, and a novel thermal microbial habitat.
Magnetism, FeS colloids, and Origins of Life
Cheap micro-controllers, such as the Arduino or other controllers based on the Atmel AVR CPUs are being deployed in a wide variety of pro jects, ranging from sensors networks to robotic submarines.
The Arduino as a Hardware Random-Number Generator
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