stunt

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v stunt perform a stunt or stunts
    • v stunt check the growth or development of "You will stunt your growth by building all these muscles"
    • n stunt a difficult or unusual or dangerous feat; usually done to gain attention
    • n stunt a creature (especially a whale) that has been prevented from attaining full growth
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Babe Ruth was able to throw two baseballs in such a way that the balls remained parallel to each other all the way from his hand to the catcher's glove. Ruth was famous for this stunt and would demonstrate it on request.
    • Stunt A check in growth; also, that which has been checked in growth; a stunted animal or thing.
    • Stunt Specifically: A whale two years old, which, having been weaned, is lean, and yields but little blubber.
    • v. t Stunt To hinder from growing to the natural size; to prevent the growth of; to stint, to dwarf; as, to stunt a child; to stunt a plant. "When, by a cold penury, I blast the abilities of a nation, and stunt the growth of its active energies, the ill or may do is beyond all calculation."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: When stuntman and parachutist Dar Robinson leaped from the ledge of the 1,170 foot high CN Tower in Toronto, he was paid $150,000, the most ever for a single stunt.
    • stunt Dull; obtuse; stupid; foolish.
    • stunt Fierce; angry.
    • stunt To make a fool of.
    • stunt To check; cramp; hinder; stint: used of growth or progress.
    • stunt To check the growth or development of; hinder the increase or progress or; cramp; dwarf: as, to stunt a child by hard usage.
    • n stunt An animal which has been prevented from attaining its proper growth; a stunted creature; specifically, a whale of two years, which, having been weaned, is lean, and yields but little blubber.
    • n stunt A check in growth; a partial or complete arrest of development or progress.
    • n stunt A feat; a performance of more or less difficulty, especially in athletics.
    • stunt An assistant; assistant.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Halle Berry?s stunt double, in the movie ?Catwoman?, is a man.
    • v.t Stunt stunt to hinder from growth, to dwarf, check
    • n Stunt a check in growth: an animal whose growth is stunted
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Quotations

  • Arthur Schopenhauer
    Arthur%20Schopenhauer
    “Only a male intellect clouded by the sexual drive could call the stunted, narrow-shouldered, broad-hipped and short-legged sex the fair sex.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Stint

Usage

In literature:

Your creative tract is prepared for action and has been doing a little stunt all by itself.
"Black Oxen" by Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton
The stunt did more than earn the boys a large share of fame.
"Radio Boys Loyalty" by Wayne Whipple
Also, small stunted trees unfit for timber.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
That was a stunt that stuck, though.
"Odd Numbers" by Sewell Ford
Sapwood of old and stunted pines is composed of more rings than that of young and thrifty specimens.
"Seasoning of Wood" by Joseph B. Wagner
Carmeau will never show me new stunts again.
"The Trail of the Hawk" by Sinclair Lewis
I remember the stunt myself.
"A Pirate of Parts" by Richard Neville
Matter fact, I worked out the right stunt, coming down.
"Free Air" by Sinclair Lewis
What about your little stunt?
"Crooked Trails and Straight" by William MacLeod Raine
Have any idea what they'd pay for a stunt like that?
"Summer Snow Storm" by Adam Chase
Now who'd think of a stunt like that?
"The Boy Ranchers on Roaring River" by Willard F. Baker
I've been doing stunts and I just ached for a real, regular ride.
"Penny of Top Hill Trail" by Belle Kanaris Maniates
By these it may be rendered luxuriant in its growth, or it may be stunted in its growth.
"Christianity and Greek Philosophy" by Benjamin Franklin Cocker
At its base they saw growing a grove of stunted trees.
"The Giraffe Hunters" by Mayne Reid
It was in a primitive temple constructed of stones and stunted trees, surrounded by growing bushes.
"Due West" by Maturin Murray Ballou
He was a stunted, wiry little man of thirty-five.
"The Dark Star" by Robert W. Chambers
Some stunt, I'll say.
"The Dust Flower" by Basil King
I approve of the stunt because it is always the stuntist's own.
"Imaginary Interviews" by W. D. Howells
Somehow he ain't the kind you'd look for any hot stunts from.
"Side-stepping with Shorty" by Sewell Ford
On the high ridges it is stunted.
"The Forests of Mount Rainier National Park" by Grenville F. Allen
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In poetry:

When some must go to bear the brunt,
And check the German Kaiser's stunt,
We still can brag, and wave the flag,
But send the British to the front.
"The Canadian Way" by Abner Cosens
Leaning in mute expectancy,
Beneath a stunted sycamore,
She added darkness utterly,
To the dim light, the shrouded tree,
By her hands held her face before.
"A Legend Of Christ's Nativity" by Duncan Campbell Scott
It was scattered and stunted, and told me
That soon even that would be gone:
It whispered, "The grim walls enfold me,
I have bloomed in my last summer's sun."
"Loud without the wind was roaring" by Emily Jane Bronte
And near the cottage door there was an elm tree;
But that stunted elm tree she never did see,
Yet her little heart sometimes felt gay
As she listened to the thrushes that warbled the live-long day.
"The Blind Girl" by William Topaz McGonagall
'Twas 'ard! But sternly I pursoo'd
Me course; an' wore a frown
Thro' swallerin' me speech unchewed,
An' chokin' curse-words down.
Oh, dear! It was a dreadful stunt!
Then, gracious me, I hit the Front!
"The Invalid" by C J Dennis
"He is the warrior supreme,
The Super-caveman, one might say;
The pride of youth, the maiden's dream,
And in the chase the first to slay.
Where we are stunted he is tall:
In short, a menace to us all.
"Equality" by Robert W Service

In news:

Mostly because it's the only pie-in-the-face stunt of note in the history of the NFC North blog.
Illusionist David Blaine's Electrifying Stunt Is Shockingly Safe.
Why David Blaine's million-volt stunt is shockingly safe.
David Blaine's electrifying stunt is shockingly safe.
Illusionist David Blaine's Electrifying Stunt is Shockingly Safe.
Santa and his elf seem to have problems right off the bat, but still decide to go forward with the stunt.
Gary Powell is the guy you call when a movie stunt enters ""death-defying"" territory.
Daredevil stuntman Blaine goes for shock-factor with latest stunt.
Daredevil stuntman David Blaine goes for shock-factor with latest high voltage stunt.
Stunt-man , free-runner, parkour specialist.
A Stuntman 's Guide to the Most Exciting Stunts in Film History.
He's a stunt man in the film and even supplied some key props.
I've met my craft match in stunt man Rocky Hardcore.
A stunt pilot died when he crashed his plane into the Gulf of Mexico north of Tampa.
Stunt pilot knows the drill.
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In science:

Similarly we see this where the sharing is stunted in irregular mobility between 700 and 800 seconds.
Content Sharing for Mobile Devices
Star formation may be triggered by supernovae shock waves in neighboring clouds (Elmegreen & Lada 1977) but, at closer quarters, it may be stunted by photoionization and evaporation of molecular clumps within HII regions (Hester et al. 1996).
The Masses of the Orion Proplyds from Submillimeter Dust Emission
This is because it enables perturbations to grow on all distance scales, whereas relativistic hot dark matter escapes from small-scale perturbations, whose growth via gravitational instabilities is thereby stunted 137 .
The Strange Spin of the Nucleon
Hence we obtain the stunted growth (stagnation) of Raman transformation once again.
A simple theory for the Raman spike
Note that periodic orbits orb(p) that avoid int(∪iZi ) are the same as periodic orbits of the non-stunted map S .
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
To each map f ∈ P d one can associate uniquely a stunted sawtooth map as follows.
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
Let us define f 7→ Ψ(f ) ∈ S d , by associating to f the unique stunted sawtooth map Ψ(f ) which agrees with S outside ∪Zi and which is constant on Zi with value S (si ).
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
Example 3. (i) If f is a quadratic map with an attracting fixed point, then Ψ(f ) is a stunted sawtooth map which is either equal to the constant map T0 corresponding to the parameter ζ = −e or to the map T1 which has a plateau [p2 , p1 ] corresponding to the parameter ζ = p1 , see Figure 6.
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
If Tn = Ψ(fn ), then Tn is a stunted sawtooth map with Tn (−e) = −e, Tn (Z1) ≡ Tn (e) = e and Tn (Z2) approaches Z1 from the left as n → ∞.
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
Let Tn ∈ S 3 be a stunted sawtooth map such that Tn (−e) = Tn (e) = e and Tn (Z1) = −e for al l n.
Monotonicity of entropy for real multimodal maps
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