stress

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v stress put stress on; utter with an accent "In Farsi, you accent the last syllable of each word"
    • v stress to stress, single out as important "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
    • v stress test the limits of "You are trying my patience!"
    • n stress the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch) "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
    • n stress (physics) force that produces strain on a physical body "the intensity of stress is expressed in units of force divided by units of area"
    • n stress (psychology) a state of mental or emotional strain or suspense "he suffered from fatigue and emotional tension","stress is a vasoconstrictor"
    • n stress difficulty that causes worry or emotional tension "she endured the stresses and strains of life","he presided over the economy during the period of the greatest stress and danger"- R.J.Samuelson"
    • n stress special emphasis attached to something "the stress was more on accuracy than on speed"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Some octopuses have been known to eat their arms off when they are exposed to stressful situations
    • stress (Mech) a pressure or stress at right angles to the length, as of a beam or bridge; -- distinguished from longitudinal pressure or stress.
    • Stress Distress. "Sad hersal of his heavy stress ."
    • Stress (Scots Law) Distress; the act of distraining; also, the thing distrained.
    • Stress (Pron) Force of utterance expended upon words or syllables. Stress is in English the chief element in accent and is one of the most important in emphasis. See Guide to pronunciation, §§ 31-35.
    • Stress Pressure, strain; -- used chiefly of immaterial things; except in mechanics; hence, urgency; importance; weight; significance. "The faculties of the mind are improved by exercise, yet they must not be put to a stress beyond their strength.""A body may as well lay too little as too much stress upon a dream."
    • Stress (Mech. & Physics) The force, or combination of forces, which produces a strain; force exerted in any direction or manner between contiguous bodies, or parts of bodies, and taking specific names according to its direction, or mode of action, as thrust or pressure pull or tension shear or tangential stress. "Stress is the mutual action between portions of matter."
    • Stress To place emphasis on; to make emphatic; emphasize.
    • Stress To press; to urge; to distress; to put to difficulties.
    • Stress To subject to phonetic stress; to accent.
    • Stress To subject to stress, pressure, or strain.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: A chicken loses its feathers when it becomes stressed
    • stress To straiten; constrain; press; urge; hamper.
    • stress In mech., to subject to a stress.
    • stress To lay the stress, emphasis, or accent on; emphasize.
    • n stress Constraining, urging, or impelling force; constraining power or influence; pressure; urgency; violence.
    • n stress In mech., an elastic force, whether in equilibrium with an external force or not; the force called into play by a strain. This word was introduced into mechanics by Rankine in 1855. In the following year Sir William Thomson used the word as synonymous with pressure, or an external force balanced by elastic forces. The terminology has been further confused by the use of Rankine's word strain, by Thomson and others, as a synonym for deformation. The words stress and strain are needed in the senses originally given to them by Rankine; while they both have familiar equivalents to which they have been wrested. At present, some writers use them in one way and some in the other.
    • n stress Stretch; strain; effort.
    • n stress Weight; importance; special force or significance; emphasis.
    • n stress The relative loudness with which certain syllables or parts of syllables are pronounced; emphasis in utterance; accent; ictus. In elocution, initial, opening, or radical stress is stress or emphasis at the beginning; medial or median stress is that in the middle; and close, final, or vanishing stress is stress at the end of a vowel-sound. The union of initial and final is compound stress, that of all three stresses is thorough stress.
    • n stress Relatively to another stress, a stress orthogonal to a strain perfectly concurrent with the other stress.
    • n stress Relatively to an infinitesimal homogeneous strain, a stress such that, if the strain be so compounded with a rotation as to produce a pure strain, the motions of the particles upon the surface of a sphere relatively to its center represent in magnitude and direction the components of the stress.
    • n stress Synonyms Accent, etc. See emphasis.
    • n stress Distress; difficulty; extremity; pinch.
    • n stress In law: The act of distraining; distress.
    • n stress A former mode of taking up indictments for circuit courts.
    • n stress In electricity, electromotive force; difference of potential; pressure: as, a stress of 2000 volts.
    • n stress A stress in the direction opposite to the usual stress to which a piece in a structure is subjected. In this case the negative stress may be either tension or compression.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: 75-90% of primary physician visits are due to stress
    • n Stress stres force: pressure: urgency: strain: violence, as of the weather: the relative loudness or emphasis with which certain syllables are pronounced, accent: weight, importance:
    • v.t Stress to constrain: lay stress on: to emphasise
    • n Stress stres distress: legal distraining.
    • n Stress stres (mech.) force exerted in any direction or manner between two bodies—the greatest stress which a substance will bear without being torn asunder being its ultimate strength
    • ***

Quotations

  • Salman Rushdie
    Salman%20Rushdie
    “I used to say: there is a God-shaped hole in me. For a long time I stressed the absence, the hole. Now I find it is the shape which has become more important.”
  • Denis Waitley
    Denis%20Waitley
    “Courage means to keep working a relationship, to continue seeking solutions to difficult problems, and to stay focused during stressful periods.”
  • Richard Saunders
    Richard Saunders
    “Brain cells create ideas. Stress kills brain cells. Stress is not a good idea.”
  • John Gray
    John Gray
    “A women under stress is not immediately concerned with finding solutions to her problems but rather seeks relief by expressing herself and being understood.”
  • W. Somerset Maugham
    W.%20Somerset%20Maugham
    “Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one's mind.”
  • Andrew Denton
    Andrew Denton
    “Pressure and stress is the common cold of the psyche.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Abbrev. fr. distress,; or cf. OF. estrecier, to press, pinch, (assumed) LL. strictiare, fr. L. strictus,. See Distress
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. estrecir, from L. strictus, stringĕre, to draw tight.

Usage

In literature:

If the speaker desires to impress on others his own feelings or convictions, the final stress is the result.
"The Ontario High School Reader" by A.E. Marty
We find, as we might expect, that it is not on Man simply as individual that stress is here laid.
"The Religious Experience of the Roman People" by W. Warde Fowler
It may seem to many, that we lay too much stress on this point, of danger from moles and mice.
"Farm drainage" by Henry Flagg French
Under the storm and stress of her troubles Mrs. Osbourne had been stricken with fever.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 13" by Elbert Hubbard
The stress of passion often discloses an aspect of the personality completely ignored till then by its closest intimates.
"Chance" by Joseph Conrad
Each one of the many, many ugly war-machines was sealed in its own cocoon of overdrive-stressed space.
"Talents, Incorporated" by William Fitzgerald Jenkins
But this aspect of Jackson's personality has been too much stressed.
"A History of the United States" by Cecil Chesterton
The trouble is our faith grows dim in these moments of stress.
"The Root of Evil" by Thomas Dixon
So familiar are these matters to the general public that only one point need here be stressed: the difference between nationality and race.
"The New World of Islam" by Lothrop Stoddard
Aren't such attacks characteristic of the stress and strain of modern life?
"Disturbing Sun" by Robert Shirley Richardson
Augustine laid great stress on 1 Cor.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
In the stress and passion of the melody he had found out the truth.
"The Snowshoe Trail" by Edison Marshall
Even in that moment of stress Mayo could figure out how it had happened.
"Blow The Man Down" by Holman Day
Charmilly, after a long visit to Hayti, returned to London in September 1794, and laid stress on this in several letters to Pitt.
"William Pitt and the Great War" by John Holland Rose
The fleet was divided by stress of weather.
"Sir Walter Ralegh" by William Stebbing
It fails to stress the Christian's privilege of present realization.
"The Pursuit of God" by A. W. Tozer
It was the surest shelter against harm in such stress as this.
"Blackbeard: Buccaneer" by Ralph D. Paine
In Russia, teachers lay great stress upon careful grading.
"Great Pianists on Piano Playing" by James Francis Cooke
Our Regulations (Sections 129 and 324) lay special stress on this latter point, and in most regiments it is constantly practised.
"Cavalry in Future Wars" by Frederick von Bernhardi
Her brain reeled and her heart ached under the intolerable stress.
"Somehow Good" by William de Morgan
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In poetry:

BUT. Hold! Ere upon your loss
You lay much stress,
A long-concealed crime
I would confess.
"HMS Pinafore: Act II" by William Schwenck Gilbert
By faith my works, my righteousness,
And duties all I own
But loss and dung; and lay my stress
On what my Lord has done.
"The Believer's Principles : Chap. IV." by Ralph Erskine
But in Life’s stress and struggle,
We somehow, grew apart,
You know these Irish mothers,
'Tis “the childer” has their heart.
"Himself" by Alice Guerin Crist
Yet one prayer more my heart audacious,
Weeping, lifts up in bodeful stress,
What if my native land forget me
In my sad exile's loneliness?
"To Kasbek" by Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov
But sorrow bides with us and ill,
And stress and sacrifice and loss,
And we must strive to meet them still
Climbing the weary "Way of the Cross."
"The Way Of The Cross" by Clinton Scollard
For my great pity in his stress
Because that sad and bare he went,
I now am clad with happiness,
And rich in sweet content:
'Twas Love, the King, who crossed my way
To-day.
"The Wayfarer" by Anna Johnston MacManus

In news:

Will Workers Be Sick , Stressed and Dissatisfied.
Or does the candidate who is trailing in the polls tend to be under greater stress - and therefore likely to blink more often.
Or does the candidate who is trailing in the polls tend to be under greater stress — and therefore likely to blink more often.
Hormones and oils can increase with your stress level and create the right environment for bacteria to grow rapidly.
Troops stressed to breaking point .
Counselors stress listening to threats of suicide.
Archie wanted to take a bit of Holidiay stress away by sharing this video he ran into.
Stress free cause they aren't all in your home, but you can still get a huge overload on ' Cuteness ' just by watching the video.
Berea's Mayor Cyril Kleem warns of stressed general fund.
Mayor Cyril M Kleem will give a presentation about the city's stressed general fund at Tuesday's City Council meeting.
Calves and heifers also suffer performance losses during heat stress.
Ever feel so stressed you don't know where to begin de-stressing.
NEW YORK--One-third of Americans are living with extreme stress and nearly half of Americans (48 percent) believe that their stress has increased over the past five years.
If your bird is stressed out in your home, provide ways to de-stress it with these tips.
(FORTUNE Magazine) – Stress has become part of everyday life--40% of US workers feel it on the job--but not all stress is bad.
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In science:

Let us consider the case of a stress energy tensor corresponding to a perfect fluid, Tµν = (d + p) uµ uν + gµν p, with d the density of the fluid and p its pressure.
Quintessence-like Dark Matter in Spiral Galaxies
We start this section by stressing that only spectral properties on the scale of the average level spacing can be described by Random Matrix Theory.
Randomness on the Lattice
With this, we can now compute the components of the stress tensor.
Black Holes Must Die
Finally we stress that from the third condition in Definition 2 it follows that the stress energy tensor contracted twice with lα is identically zero, i.e. Tαβ lα lβ = 0.
The First Law of Isolated Horizons via Noether Theorem
Some restriction on the stress tensor is usually essential , because every spacetime is a solution of Einstein’s equations with some stress tensor.
The Classical Singularity Theorems and their Quantum Loopholes
To better understand random stresses, it is useful to consider a model in which random stress is introduced in a material that is initially stress free.
Nonaffine Correlations in Random Elastic Media
The difference in A/(γ 2∆K (x = 0)/µ2 ) between stressed and stress-free lattices is most likely a higher order effect due to the breaking of hexagonal symmetry as β is increased.
Nonaffine Correlations in Random Elastic Media
We will also calculate the stress energy tensor and we will show that it is equal to the stress energy tensor for D(p-1)-brane.
Tachyon Kink on non-BPS Dp-brane in the General Background
The aim is to determine the critical stress σc for this model such that if the external stress exceeds σc , the bundle breaks down completely.
Critical behaviour of mixed random fibers, fibers on a chain and random graph
The mechanism of the failure of RFBM is the following: under an external stress σ , a fraction of fibers having threshold strength less than the applied stress fail immediately.
Critical behaviour of mixed random fibers, fibers on a chain and random graph
In particular, we find that not only is the stress-stress correlation long ranged—behavior that can be argued for on general grounds—but so are the cross-correlation between the residual stress and, e.g., the shear modulus.
Elastic heterogeneity of soft random solids
It can be shown that σ obeys the equilibrium condition e∂j σjk ( ˜z ) = 0. (Strictly speaking, the residual stress σ , defined here, is the leading-order term of the true stress, in the sense of a gradient expansion, owing to the non-locality of our model.
Elastic heterogeneity of soft random solids
Eventually, the force reaches a minimum (i.e., a maximum tensile stress), following which the tensile stress slowly decreases to zero over a long displacement range.
Asperity contacts at the nanoscale: comparison of Ru and Au
This relaxed reference state is, however, still randomly stressed ; nevertheless, the stress in this state—the so-called residual stress—does satisfy the condition of mechanical equilibrium, viz., ∂iσij (x) = 0.
Soft random solids and their heterogeneous elasticity
If we want to stress that a quantity refers to the total stress-energy content below we will provide it with the subscript tot, e.g., Ωtot .
Perfect fluids and generic spacelike singularities
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