strake

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n strake thick plank forming a ridge along the side of a wooden ship
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Strake imp. of Strike.
    • Strake A streak. "White strake ."
    • Strake (Mining) A trough for washing broken ore, gravel, or sand; a launder.
    • Strake An iron band by which the fellies of a wheel are secured to each other, being not continuous, as the tire is, but made up of separate pieces.
    • Strake (Shipbuilding) One breadth of planks or plates forming a continuous range on the bottom or sides of a vessel, reaching from the stem to the stern; a streak.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • strake To move; go; proceed.
    • n strake A streak; a stripe.
    • n strake A strip; a narrow tract.
    • n strake A reef in a sail.
    • n strake A rut in a road.
    • n strake A crack in a floor.
    • n strake A breadth of plank or planking; specifically, a continuous line of planking or plates on a vessel's side, reaching from stem to stern. Also streak and shutter-in. See cut under clincher-built.
    • n strake The iron band used to bind the fellies of a wheel; the hoop or tire of a wheel.
    • n strake A piece of board or metal used for scraping off the skimpings in handjigging or tozing.
    • n strake Same as lye.
    • n strake A bushel: more commonly strike (which see).
    • n strake In hunting, a particular signal with a horn.
    • n strake An obsolete preterit of strike.
    • strake A dialectal (Scotch) form of stroke.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • pa.t Strake strāk obsolete of strike.
    • n Strake strāk one breadth of plank in a ship, either within or without board, wrought from the stem to the sternpost: the hoop or tire of a wheel; (obs.) a bushel: the place where ore is assorted on a mine floor
    • Strake Also Straik
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Streak

Usage

In literature:

But they sawen it into planks and strakes as far as it might go, To maken beds for their own wives and little children also.
"Rewards and Fairies" by Rudyard Kipling
There is a wide "black strake" at the waterline And above is a blue like the sky when the weather is fine.
"Men, Women and Ghosts" by Amy Lowell
Strake has a splendid idea.
"The Financier" by Theodore Dreiser
The fall or inclination of the tables, both copper and blanket strakes, is also regulated by the class of ore.
"Getting Gold" by J. C. F. Johnson
The two top strakes are single again, and 6 inches thick.
"The South Pole, Volumes 1 and 2" by Roald Amundsen
Or, in the watches, to hear the sea lashing along her strakes in never ending music!
"Richard Carvel, Complete" by Winston Churchill
Than Sir Mathewe strake asonder the speare wyth his swerde.
"Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3)" by Walter Scott
Finally he was stricken to the earth, and they cut off his arms and legs and then strake his body all to pieces.
"Chronicle and Romance (The Harvard Classics Series)" by Jean Froissart, Thomas Malory, Raphael Holinshed
And now," he cried in a loud voice, "let them blaw the strake.
"The Lancashire Witches" by William Harrison Ainsworth
But when t' gran'father's clock strake fower he said I mun away to my bed.
"More Tales of the Ridings" by Frederic Moorman
It was Godfrey that straked him out all alone on this table.
"Old Man Savarin and Other Stories" by Edward William Thomson
Let me see, I'll send word to him by Strake.
"Syd Belton" by George Manville Fenn
A Straker made the strakes, or tires, of wheels.
"The Romance of Names" by Ernest Weekley
Some strake the measure o' justice, but ye gie't heapit.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
There is still a long swell on the sea and they lie over to it, showing a broad strake of composition.
"Merchantmen-at-Arms" by David W. Bone
He passed with long strides from rock to rock, and returned dragging wildly sometimes a rider, sometimes a binding strake.
"Toilers of the Sea" by Victor Hugo
The two upper strakes are only 3/4 in.
"Ancient and Modern Ships." by George C. V. Holmes
It feels like a strake av fire!
"The Headless Horseman" by Mayne Reid
The kelp-burner still stood, straking the smouldering seaweed.
"The Divine Adventure Volume IV" by Fiona Macleod
Sometimes before the buddles have been filled full, the boys throw the material into a bowl and carry it to the strakes and wash it.
"De Re Metallica" by Georgius Agricola
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In poetry:

The bride she drew a long bodkin
Frae out her gay head-gear,
And strake Fair Annet unto the heart,
That word spak nevir mair.
"Lord Thomas And Fair Annet" by Andrew Lang
"Oh, fly aloft to the garboard strake!
And reef the spanker boom;
Bend a studding sail on the martingale,
To give her weather room."
"A Sailor's Yarn" by James Jeffrey Roche
"Now stay for me, dear Annet," he sed,
"Now stay, my dear," he cry'd;
Then strake the dagger untill his heart,
And fell deid by her side.
"Lord Thomas And Fair Annet" by Andrew Lang

In news:

A deep-vee bow entry, and corresponding strakes and reverse chines, make possible Barracuda Boatworks' Cuda 27 sharp maneuvering, hull lift and spray deflection, says Barracuda 's Dustin Bates.
The skeletal hull of steam-bent strakes and chines only partially covered by the tight planks that would make it seaworthy.
Strake Jesuit to host St Thomas.
It forgoes conventional strakes in favor of shinglelike hull panels.
A 7 1/2-inch planing strake running the last six feet of the hull reduces the flat surface up front for a smooth and exceptionally clean ride with little air coming off the entry.
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In science:

Our results sharpen and generalize Walschap and Strake’s conditions under which a vector bundle admits a connection metric of nonnegative curvature.
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
In , Strake and Walschap studied conditions under which a vector bundle admits a connection metric of nonnegative curvature.
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
One direction of part 1, namely that positive curvature implies the inequality, follows from the argument in by which Walschap and Strake established inequality 1.2.
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
Part 1 of Theorem B in this case follows from Strake and Walschap’s work, and also appears explicitly in .
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
As we mentioned in the introduction, Strake and Walschap showed by explicit computation that, for a connection metric gE of nonnegative curvature on the total space E of a vector bundle Rk → E π→ Σ, inequality 1.2 from our introduction is satisfied.
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
Much of the work of this calculation was done by Walschap and Strake in .
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
It follows from Walschap and Strake’s work that for any value of ǫ > 0, the constant C can be chosen so that Q3 is nonnegative definite.
Conditions for Nonnegative Curvature on Vector Bundles and Sphere Bundles
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