stork

Definitions

  • King Log and King Stork
    King Log and King Stork
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n stork large mostly Old World wading birds typically having white-and-black plumage
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Some frogs sitting on a log about to be eaten by a stork. Zeus looks on from afar Some frogs sitting on a log about to be eaten by a stork. Zeus looks on from afar
A stork eating soup from a jug at dinner party while a fox watches A stork eating soup from a jug at dinner party while a fox watches
Frame 1: A religious woman is presented a sporting magazine from 'Mr. Fox'. The caption says: “With Mr Fox's respects & many happy returns of the day” Frame 2: A hunter is presented a religious text from 'Mrs. Stork'. The caption says: “With Mrs Stork's kind regards and the compliments of the season” Frame 1: A religious woman is presented a sporting magazine from 'Mr. Fox'. The caption says: “With Mr Fox's respects...
THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK
THE FOX AND THE STORK THE FOX AND THE STORK

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Storks were a symbol of fertility in Europe and were considered to bring good luck
    • n Stork (Zoöl) Any one of several species of large wading birds of the family Ciconidæ, having long legs and a long, pointed bill. They are found both in the Old World and in America, and belong to Ciconia and several allied genera. The European white stork (Ciconia alba) is the best known. It commonly makes its nests on the top of a building, a chimney, a church spire, or a pillar. The black stork (C. nigra) is native of Asia, Africa, and Europe.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The flamingoes of East Africa have few natural enemies. In general, the only predators an adult flamingo need fear are the fish eagle and the marabou stork.
    • n stork A large altricial grallatorial bird, of the family Ciconiidæ and especially of the subfamily Ciconiinæ (which see for technical characters). The stork is related to the herons, spoonbills, and ibises, but not very closely to the cranes. There are several species, found in nearly all temperate and tropical regions. They are tall and stately birds, equaling the cranes and larger herons in stature, but are readily distinguished by many technical characters. Storks are wading birds, frequenting the vicinity of water; but some of them become semi-domesticated, and often nest on buildings. Their fidelity and amiability are traditional. They feed chiefly on reptiles (as snakes and lizards), amphibians (as frogs), fishes, mollusks, and worms, but also sometimes capture small quadrupeds and birds. The best-known species is the common white stork of Europe, Ciconiaalba; when adult, it is pure-white with black-tipped wings and reddish bill and feet; it is about 3½ feet long, and stands 4 feet high. The black stork of the same country is C. nigra, a rarer species. Various birds of different countries, technically storks, are known by other names, as adjutant, marabou, maguari, jabiru, shell-ibis, and wood-ibis. See these words, and cuts under adjutant-bird, Ciconiidæ, Grallæ, jabiru, openbill, Pelargomorphæ, simbil, and Tantalus.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stork stork a long-necked and long-legged wading-bird nearly allied to the heron, spoonbill, and ibis—the Common stork, White stork (Ciconia alba) about 3½ feet long, migratory in habit, common in Holland and northern Germany, often semi-domesticated, nesting on the tops of houses, &c
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
AS. storc,; akin to G. storch, OHG. storah, Icel. storkr, Dan. & Sw. stork, and perhaps to Gr. a vulture
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. storc; Ger. stork.

Usage

In literature:

In the evening the Hazel-nut child crept on to the roof, where some storks had built their nest.
"The Yellow Fairy Book" by Leonora Blanche Alleyne Lang
The great bird in Holland is the stork, which is kept and given a home because of the service rendered in keeping down toads and frogs.
"Birdseye Views of Far Lands" by James T. Nichols
Similarly with regard to the stork fable.
"The Sexual Life of the Child" by Albert Moll
You'll believe next that we came here in a car drawn by flying storks, I suppose!
"In Brief Authority" by F. Anstey
He was succeeded in February by Sir Henry Storks.
"The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861" by Queen of Great Britain Victoria
Once I saw some storks that had flown down from Strassburg and were standing on their long legs in the marshes.
"Rafael in Italy" by Etta Blaisdell McDonald
I've seen young storks fly.
"Harper's Young People, April 13, 1880" by Various
The ugliest storks in the world are found in Southern Asia and Central Africa.
"Harper's Young People, May 11, 1880" by Various
The swallows and the storks have gone away long ago.
"A Bride of the Plains" by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
As for the Stork, its very rooms were named in remembrance of the envoys and merchant traders who flocked to it on all great occasions.
"Holbein" by Beatrice Fortescue
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In poetry:

Once in the banquet-hall
These scarlet storks are heard:--
I sit at board with men o' th' sword
And knights of noble word;
"Death In Life" by Madison Julius Cawein
Stork, the tender rose tree,
That bloometh when you are here,
Trembled and sighed like a waiting bride--
Then drooped on a virgin bier.
"Armenian Folk-Song--The Stork" by Eugene Field
Still, my heart, now sets the sun,
While the moor is resting,
Herds now homeward are begun,
And the stork is nesting.
Still, my heart, now sets the sun.
"Evening" by Jeppe Aakjaer
Take thou example from the stork, that feeds
His sire, when old, and to him succour brings,
Righting his nest, and fetching what he needs,
Or fost'ring him, when weak, beneath his wings.
"The Duty Of Children To Their Parents" by Rees Prichard
The young stork sleeps in the pine-tree tops,
Down on the brink of the river.
My baby sleeps by the bamboo copse--
The bamboo copse where the rice field stops:
The bamboos sigh and shiver.
"A Japanese Mother" by Cale Young Rice
With pity's just, and dauntless, haste,
She mounts the ladder rightly plac'd,
She rears the guardian fork;
Her heart expands, with hope elate,
That she shall kindly snatch from fate
Each tender little Stork.
"The Stork" by William Hayley

In news:

Stork Technical Services heralds rebrand of RBG with multi-million pound contract extension.
Light-Sport Chronicles: The " Stork " Flies Again.
Called the acquisition "an exciting milestone" in Stork 's "growth strategy.".
Stork Materials Technology is proud to announce another US location has earned Nadcap accreditation for testing and inspection.
Westbrook is New Stork Garwood GM Aug 23, 2010 Printable format Email this Article Search.
Janet was born on December 1, 1954, the third of Gilbert and Winifred Stork 's four children.
Birders take notice of stork 's stop in Woodstock.
The stork 's stay in Woodstock will be dependent on the weather, which, when it cools, means the bird will likely head back south, Frenzel said.
A wood stork flies over a pond on the Bushong Farm on Tuesday.
Ben-Dror Yemini of the Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv has a blockbuster article laying out the ugly truth of Stork 's history.
Depending on the sales success of the G650, Stork 's revenues from the program could total approximately $600 million.
I got out and walked a few blocks to Stork 's, a German bakery on 150th Street.
" Stork 's done a great job," Manuel said.
Birders take notice of stork's stop in Woodstock.
A wood stork walks along a pond on the Bushong Farm off Fravel Road west of Woodstock on Tuesday.
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In science:

Duda, Richard O., Hart, Peter E., and Stork, David G. (2000), Pattern Recognition, (2nd ed.), New York: Wiley-Interscience.
Partition Decomposition for Roll Call Data
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