stele

Definitions

  • the Façade and The Stele of The Tomb Of Phtahshopsisu at Saqqara
    the Façade and The Stele of The Tomb Of Phtahshopsisu at Saqqara
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n stele an ancient upright stone slab bearing markings
    • n stele the usually cylindrical central vascular portion of the axis of a vascular plant
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Stele in the Form of a Door Stele in the Form of a Door
the Funeral Stele of The Tomb Of Amten, The 'grand Huntsman the Funeral Stele of The Tomb Of Amten, The 'grand Huntsman
Stele of SÎtÛ, Representing the Front Of a House Stele of SÎtÛ, Representing the Front Of a House
a Boundary Stele a Boundary Stele
Stele of the Daughter Of Kheops Stele of the Daughter Of Kheops
the Triumphal Stele of Usirtasen I the Triumphal Stele of Usirtasen I

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Stele stēl A stale, or handle; a stalk.
    • n Stele stē"lē Same as Stela. "One of these steles , containing the Greek version of the ordinance, has recently been discovered."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n stele An old spelling of steal, steal.
    • n stele An obsolete form of stale.
    • n stele In archaeology: An upright slab or pillar, often crowned with a rich anthemion, and sometimes bearing more or less elaborate sculpture or a painted scene, commonly used among the ancient Greeks as a gravestone.
    • n stele A similar slab or pillar serving as a milestone, to bear an inscription in some public place, or for a like purpose.
    • n stele In botany, the axial cylinder of a stem, beginning as the plerome (see plerome, 2, and plerome-sheath) and passing into the older tissues which supply the vascular tissue of the plant.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stele stē′lē an upright stone slab or tablet, either sepulchral or on which laws, decrees, &c. are inscribed—also Stē′la
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Stale a handle
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L.,—Gr. stēlēhistanai, to set, stand.

Usage

In literature:

In the Palermo Stele it is recognized that we possess a primitive chronicle of this character.
"Legends Of Babylon And Egypt" by Leonard W. King
On a stele in the centre stood a little ivory Eros of wonderful antique workmanship.
"Thais" by Anatole France
A fresh head on yonder stele?
"Sir Nigel" by Arthur Conan Doyle
A lovely stele from Rhodes gives us a family group.
"Miscellanies" by Oscar Wilde
To be compared with these are seven steles from Reims, each with a triple face but only one pair of eyes.
"The Religion of the Ancient Celts" by J. A. MacCulloch
The stele is always in the form of a door with pyloni-form cornice.
"History Of Egypt, Chaldæa, Syria, Babylonia, And Assyria In The Light Of Recent Discovery" by L.W. King and H.R. Hall
It is a stele of common grey stone with a circular top.
"History Of Egypt, Chaldæa, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12)" by G. Maspero
Here there was formerly an altar; and a stele of Thutmosis IV.
"History Of Egypt From 330 B.C. To The Present Time, Volume 12 (of 12)" by S. Rappoport
He had even made plans for a monument, a broken stele with comedy masks suspended upon it.
"A Mummer's Tale" by Anatole France
Than stele they; or Rubbe they.
"The Ship of Fools, Volume 1" by Sebastian Brandt
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In poetry:

An arow that a cloth-yarde was lang
To the harde stele halyde he;
A dynt that was both sad and soar
He sat on Ser Hewe the Monggombyrry.
"Chevy-Chase" by Anonymous British

In news:

Anthropomorphic stele from the "Roads of Arabia " exhibit at the Arthur M Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC The exhibit will be until February 24, 2013.
Stone stele appears to focus on Buddha 's life before enlightenment.
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