stagger

Definitions

  • Showing decorated staggered arches on columns
    Showing decorated staggered arches on columns
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v stagger to arrange in a systematic order "stagger the chairs in the lecture hall"
    • v stagger astound or overwhelm, as with shock "She was staggered with bills after she tried to rebuild her house following the earthquake"
    • v stagger walk as if unable to control one's movements "The drunken man staggered into the room"
    • v stagger walk with great difficulty "He staggered along in the heavy snow"
    • n stagger an unsteady uneven gait
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Staggering Man Staggering Man

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Stagger (Far) A disease of horses and other animals, attended by reeling, unsteady gait or sudden falling; as, parasitic staggers; apopletic or sleepy staggers.
    • Stagger An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; -- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.
    • Stagger Bewilderment; perplexity.
    • Stagger To arrange (a series of parts) on each side of a median line alternately, as the spokes of a wheel or the rivets of a boiler seam.
    • Stagger To begin to doubt and waver in purpose; to become less confident or determined; to hesitate. "He [Abraham staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief."
    • Stagger To cause to doubt and waver; to make to hesitate; to make less steady or confident; to shock. "Whosoever will read the story of this war will find himself much staggered .""Grants to the house of Russell were so enormous, as not only to outrage economy, but even to stagger credibility."
    • Stagger To cause to reel or totter. "That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire
      That staggers thus my person."
    • Stagger To cease to stand firm; to begin to give way; to fail. "The enemy staggers ."
    • Stagger To move to one side and the other, as if about to fall, in standing or walking; not to stand or walk with steadiness; to sway; to reel or totter. "Deep was the wound; he staggered with the blow."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • stagger To walk or stand unsteadily; reel; totter.
    • stagger To hesitate; begin to doubt or waver in purpose; falter; become less confident or determined; waver; vacillate.
    • stagger Synonyms Totter, etc. See reel.
    • stagger To cause to reel, totter, falter, or be unsteady; shake.
    • stagger To cause to hesitate, waver, or doubt; fill with doubts or misgivings; make less steady, determined, or confident.
    • stagger To arrange in a zigzag order; specifically, in wheel-making, to set (the spokes) in the hub alternately inside and outside (or more or less to one side of) a line drawn round the hub. The mortise-holes in such a hub are said to be dodging. A wheel made in this manner is called a staggered wheel. The objects sought in this system of construction are increased strength and stiffness in the wheel.
    • n stagger A sudden tottering motion, swing, or reel of the body as if one were about to fall, as through tripping, giddiness, or intoxication.
    • n stagger plural One of various forms of functional and organic disease of the brain and spinal cord in domesticated animals, especially horses and cattle: more fully called blind staggers. A kind of staggers (see also gid and sturdy) affecting sheep is specifically the disease resulting from a larval brain-worm. (See cænure and Tænia.) Other forms are due to disturbance of the circulation in the brain, and others again to digestive derangements. See stomach-staggers.
    • n stagger Hence plural A feeling of giddiness, reeling, or unsteadiness; a sensation which causes reeling.
    • n stagger plural Perplexities; doubts; bewilderment; confusion.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Stagger stag′ėr to reel from side to side: to begin to give way: to begin to doubt: to hesitate
    • v.t Stagger to cause to reel: to cause to doubt or hesitate: to shock
    • ***

Quotations

  • Christopher Leach
    Christopher Leach
    “Do you realize what this means? The fact of being alive... I still find it staggering that I am here at all.”
  • Abraham H. Maslow
    Abraham H. Maslow
    “Sometimes I think we're alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we're not. In either case the idea is quite staggering”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. stakeren, Icel. stakra, to push, to stagger, fr. staka, to punt, push, stagger; cf. OD. staggeren, to stagger. Cf. Stake (n.)

Usage

In literature:

The leader staggered in front, the balance following him like starved sheep.
"The Boy Chums in the Forest" by Wilmer M. Ely
He staggered from the chair.
"Empire" by Clifford Donald Simak
The situation was staggering.
"Hushed Up" by William Le Queux
Even I was staggered by the turn things had taken, though infuriated by my treatment.
"Hurricane Island" by H. B. Marriott Watson
A week passed away, but at the end of that week she arose to stagger forward.
"The Cryptogram" by James De Mille
Sudden leaping flames of passion yellowed the man's eyes, and he staggered up.
"Rose O'Paradise" by Grace Miller White
He fell, stood up, and staggered backward.
"The Saracen: Land of the Infidel" by Robert Shea
He was walking, staggering like a wounded man.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
There is sudden staggering in the Rebel ranks.
"My Days and Nights on the Battle-Field" by Charles Carleton Coffin
He staggered back, the Queen was delighted, but everybody else was frightened half to death.
"Operas Every Child Should Know" by Mary Schell Hoke Bacon
He hurled her back, and she staggered against the iron flank of the well.
"Peter the Brazen" by George F. Worts
Tiedor staggered and drew back, spinning on his heel to face them all with distended, pain-crazed eyes.
"The Copper-Clad World" by Harl Vincent
He screamed, waved his arms, staggered.
"Shaman" by Robert Shea
Sorez placed his hand to his heart again and staggered back with a piteous appeal to Wilson.
"The Web of the Golden Spider" by Frederick Orin Bartlett
Larry, sent off his balance, staggered toward the glittering machine.
"The Pygmy Planet" by John Stewart Williamson
The fugitives staggered under the blows.
"The Red Hand of Ulster" by George A. Birmingham
She staggered through it, clutching at the curtains, and fell in the darkness into Dicksie's arms.
"Whispering Smith" by Frank H. Spearman
I must have staggered along for about two miles when I perceived a light ahead.
"How I Filmed the War" by Lieut. Geoffrey H. Malins
Jose, bewildered and benumbed, staggered into his sleeping room and sank upon the bed.
"Carmen Ariza" by Charles Francis Stocking
I did that a second time, she saw me looking in, and staggered into a back room.
"My Secret Life, Volumes I. to III." by Anonymous
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In poetry:

I staggered in the mosses,
It seemed to drag me down
Into the gleaming bushes;
To fall, to sink, to drown.
"Entangled" by Mathilde Blind
No solemn host goes trailing by
The black-mouthed gun and staggering wain;
Men start not at the battle-cry,
Oh, be it never heard again!
"The Battle-Field" by William Cullen Bryant
I turn'd, and Dick (I can see him still)
Gave a look of horror and mute appeal,
Then moan'd as he stagger'd against the wheel,
"My God! that's the head of my brother Bill."
"Bill's Length" by Alexander Anderson
Then, turning as beneath some sudden blight,
I stagger'd down the churchyard big with fears,
Went down the street for the last time, the night
Around me hiding all my bitter tears.
"The First Break" by Alexander Anderson
Then he cried, "Good God! all my family gone
And now I am left to mourn alone;"
And staggering back he cried, "Give me water, give me water!"
While his heart was like to break and his teeth seem'd to chatter.
"The Sunderland Calamity" by William Topaz McGonagall
Close against the foe thrice the ringing volleys spoke,
Lashed against their ranks the stinging storm of lead;
And the bayonet behind glittered grimly thro' the smoke;
Once they stood to fire: then they staggered, broke and fled.
"Basaco" by Cicely Fox Smith

In news:

RETAIL PHARMACY staggered to its feet this year with the implementation of the Medicare Part D prescription drug program in January.
On Friday, a White Plains jury awarded the staggering sum of $9.8 million to a man, 49, who suffered sustained injuries due to a botched wisdom tooth extraction.
Put a staggering accomplishment called The Impossible, from Spanish director J.
The numbers are staggering, but the most important is the lone volunteer who helps feed needy people through the regional food bank.
Ferrari's Alonso staggered but will fight on.
Girl, join the network's schedule with staggered premieres in 2008.
Staggered games would be played on Veterans Day weekend.
With over 1000 military bases around the globe, the military's budget is simply staggering.
The French model includes caps and taxes on bonuses , as well as staggering payments over three yeas and canceling rewards if investments fail.
Whose breasts are now LLL and weigh a staggering 21 pounds -- wants to go even larger so that she can capture the record for the world's largest boobs .
The scale of wrongdoing was staggering.
(CBS News) All told, Bruno Mars' music videos have been viewed a staggering one BILLION times on YouTube.
The reductions will be staggered to make sure service levels are maintained.
It would be good if we were able to stagger them.
The Staggering Android Business Failure.
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In science:

Another possibility is the use of staggered (or Kogut-Susskind) fermions where one has only one spinor component per lattice site.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
In particular, this is true for staggered fermions.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
Staggered fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group (for any Nc ) have the symmetries of the chOE, whereas in the continuum limit the symmetries are those of the chSE.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
Similar agreement has been found for the scalar susceptibility of the U (1) staggered Dirac operator .
Randomness on the Lattice
We determined the staggered magnetization, Ms , and Cm versus T .
Monte Carlo Simulations of the Random-Field Ising Model
Upon ensemble averaging ζ will vanish, and we expect no staggering between EcJ even and odd states.
Spectroscopy with random and displaced random ensembles
The solid line is the staggered magnetization for p = 0.
Random Magnetism in $S=1/2$ Heisenberg Chains with Bond Alternation and Randomness on the Strong Bonds
According to our calculation, the staggered magnetization for ↑↓↑↓ order is much lower than that for the ↑↑↓↓ order.
Random Magnetism in $S=1/2$ Heisenberg Chains with Bond Alternation and Randomness on the Strong Bonds
According to Affleck and Oshikawa , this behavior is due to the presence of an additional “staggered” field, hst .
Elementary Excitations in Quantum Antiferromagnetic Chains: Dyons, Spinons and Breathers
Finally, let us consider the behavior of the staggered magnetization hσi (t)ih hi# .
Off equilibrium response function in the one dimensional random field Ising model
Meff(t, Lg ) as the effective staggered magnetization associated to a single interface.
Off equilibrium response function in the one dimensional random field Ising model
The mechanism responsible of this behavior is the same discussed in the previous Section for the staggered magnetization.
Off equilibrium response function in the one dimensional random field Ising model
Rescaled effective staggered magnetization Meff (t)/Lg versus rescaled average length of domains L(t)/Lg , for Lg = 25, 100.
Off equilibrium response function in the one dimensional random field Ising model
We show analytically and numerically that a purely random two-body Hamiltonian can also give rise to an odd-even staggering.
Odd-even binding effect from random two-body interactions
As we will see below, several qualitatively different regimes for ground-state staggering are possible within this simple random model, depending on the values C0 and C1 as well as on particle density.
Odd-even binding effect from random two-body interactions
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