spout

Definitions

  • A few kitchen utensils and accessories excavated at Jamestown: a ladle, brass pan, knife blades, fork, kettle fragments, spout, colander fragments, and pot hooks
    A few kitchen utensils and accessories excavated at Jamestown: a ladle, brass pan, knife blades, fork, kettle fragments, spout, colander fragments, and pot hooks
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v spout talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner
    • v spout gush forth in a sudden stream or jet "water gushed forth"
    • n spout an opening that allows the passage of liquids or grain
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Spout A discharge or jet of water or other liquid, esp. when rising in a column; also, a waterspout.
    • Spout A trough for conducting grain, flour, etc., into a receptacle.
    • Spout That through which anything spouts; a discharging lip, pipe, or orifice; a tube, pipe, or conductor of any kind through which a liquid is poured, or by which it is conveyed in a stream from one place to another; as, the spout of a teapot; a spout for conducting water from the roof of a building. "A conduit with three issuing spouts .""In whales . . . an ejection thereof [water] is contrived by a fistula, or spout , at the head.""From silver spouts the grateful liquors glide."
    • Spout To eject water or liquid in a jet.
    • Spout To issue with violence, or in a jet, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout; as, water spouts from a hole; blood spouts from an artery. "All the glittering hill
      Is bright with spouting rills."
    • Spout To pawn; to pledge; as, to spout a watch.
    • Spout To throw out forcibly and abundantly, as liquids through an orifice or a pipe; to eject in a jet; as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk. "Who kept Jonas in the fish's maw
      Till he was spouted up at Ninivee?"
      "Next on his belly floats the mighty whale . . . He spouts the tide."
    • Spout To utter a speech, especially in a pompous manner.
    • Spout To utter magniloquently; to recite in an oratorical or pompous manner. "Pray, spout some French, son."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • spout To issue with force, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout; spurt: as, blood spouts from an artery.
    • spout To discharge a fluid in a jet or continuous stream; send out liquid as from a spout or nozle; specifically, to blow, as a whale.
    • spout To speak volubly and oratorically; talk or recite in a declamatory manner, especially in public: speechify.
    • spout To pour out in a jet and with some force; throw out as through a spout or pipe: as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk.
    • spout To cause to spurt or gush out.
    • spout To utter volubly or grandiloquently.
    • spout To pawn; pledge. See spout, n., 2.
    • spout To furnish or provide with a spout, in any sense: as, to spout a roof; to spout a tea-kettle.
    • n spout A pipe, tube, or trough through which a liquid is poured, and which serves to guide its flow. Similar tubes, etc., are used for finely divided solids, as grain. The spout of a small vessel, as a pitcher, may be a mere fold or doubling of the rim, or may be a piece put on the outside, a notch having been cut in the rim to allow the liquid to pass, or may be a closed tube, as in a tea-pot or aftaba. See cut under mill.
    • n spout A lift or shoot in a pawnbroker's shop; hence, vulgarly, the shop itself.
    • n spout A continuous stream of fluid matter issuing, actually or seemingly, from a pipe or nozle; a jet or column, as of water.
    • n spout Specifically— A waterspout.
    • n spout The column of spray or vapor emitted from the spout-hole of a whale during the act of expiration, resembling the escape of steam from a valve.
    • n spout The spout-hole of a whale.
    • n spout A short underground passage connecting a main road with an air-head: a term used in the thick coal-workings of South Staffordshire, England.
    • n spout In turpentine-making, the projection of the lower gutter beyond the center of the face. See gutter, 9.
    • n spout A narrow part of a river, with a swift current.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Spout spowt to throw out, as from a pipe: to utter volubly: to pawn, pledge
    • v.i Spout to issue with violence, as from a pipe: to speak volubly, to speechify
    • n Spout the projecting mouth of a vessel from which a stream issues: a pipe for conducting a liquid: a term applied to the blowing or breathing of whales and other cetaceans
    • ***

Quotations

  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “Consider the whale: It never gets into trouble until it comes up and starts spouting.”

Idioms

Be up the spout - (UK) If a woman is up the spout, she is pregnant.
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Up the spout - (UK) If something has gone up the spout, it has gone wrong or been ruined.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. Sw. sputa, spruta, to spout, D. spuit, a spout, spuiten, to spout, and E. spurt, sprit, v., sprout, sputter,; or perhaps akin to E. spit, to eject from the mouth

Usage

In literature:

Near by was a typical Inca fountain with three stone spouts, or conduits.
"Inca Land" by Hiram Bingham
At the farther end of the shed was a small blast furnace, shooting upward a livid, blue spout of flame, which roared savagely.
"The Girl Aviators' Sky Cruise" by Margaret Burnham
Meantime, the whale rose to the surface to spout.
"The World of Waters" by Mrs. David Osborne
You will notice a little space; quite close to the spout, where nothing can be seen.
"Home Geography For Primary Grades" by C. C. Long
It was like the breaking of a water-spout.
"Overland" by John William De Forest
Another engine soon followed the first, spouting smoke and fire like the former.
"Toaster's Handbook" by Peggy Edmund and Harold W. Williams, compilers
After this the cloud, which was before immoveable, drives along for half an hour, accompanied by the spout.
"A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume X" by Robert Kerr
How loudly tinkles the collected rain down the tin spouts!
"Twice Told Tales" by Nathaniel Hawthorne
You cataracts and hurricanes, spout Till you have drench'd our steeples, drowned the cocks!
"The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and Modern Times" by Alfred Biese
In an iron spout Tom dropped big, yellow ears of corn.
"Six Little Bunkers at Grandma Bell's" by Laura Lee Hope
We asked for a pitcher of water, and she muttered something about the spout.
"Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XII, No. 28. July, 1873." by Various
The next day we saw a great number of whales of an immense size that had two spout-holes on the back of the head.
"A Voyage to the South Sea" by William Bligh
He saw fountains that would sometimes spout hot water into the air for hundreds of feet.
"Stories of American Life and Adventure" by Edward Eggleston
I first carefully noted the frequency and height of the spouts, that any change might foretell the grand finale.
"Among the Forces" by Henry White Warren
In the first place the men go about and tap the trees, drive in the spouts, and hang the buckets under.
"New National Fourth Reader" by Charles J. Barnes and J. Marshall Hawkes
They were deluged by a water spout and again their little vessel rocked fearfully.
"The Texan Star" by Joseph A. Altsheler
Whoever pumps must exert sufficient force to lift the water from the surface of the well to the spout exit.
"General Science" by Bertha M. Clark
Closer and closer came the whirling water-spout, surrounded by columns of misty spray and accompanied by the fierce wind.
"The White Squall" by John Conroy Hutcheson
Ah, laddie, ye'll ken mair spout the music when ye're a muckle bit more auld.
"Steve Young" by George Manville Fenn
I should not be surprised to see flames spouting up out of the sea.
"The Three Admirals" by W.H.G. Kingston
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In poetry:

In the thunder-spout of Him,
Until thy being dim,
And be
Dead deathlessly.
"Any Saint" by Francis Thompson
Its mouth—unreasonably small—
The hippo opened not at all,
Or, if it did, it was about
As thrilling as a teapot spout.
"Mouths Of Hippopotami And Some Recent Novels" by Ellis Parker Butler
We stud in the bight that starry night
A-tacking agin the gale
When the Capting shouts, "She spins, she spouts !
Yo-ho and avast, the whale !"
"What Ho! She Blows!" by Wallace Irwin
Huge troubles with tumultuous noise
Swell like a sea, and round me spread;
Thy water-spouts drown all my joys,
And rising waves roll o'er my head.
"Psalm 42 part 2" by Isaac Watts
Four courts I made, East, West and South and North,
In each a squared lawn, wherefrom
The golden gorge of dragons spouted forth
A flood of fountain-foam.
"The Palace of Art" by Alfred Lord Tennyson
Thus spouted Jones (whar folks could hear,
— At Court and other gatherin's),
And thus kep' spoutin' many a year,
Proclaimin' loudly far and near
Sich fiddlesticks and blatherin's.
"Jones's Private Argyment" by Sidney Lanier

In news:

Spout Off Cape May County Herald Newspaper Spout Off.
EZ Clean Vertical Spout Magnets.
The spout was initial seen by radar, and has not been spotted in person.
Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano is continuing to spout gases and hot rock fragments and it is dusting towns on its flanks with volcanic ash.
Stop Motion, Trump's 757, Water Spout .
Information on Spout 's schedule and conditions is available at its website, www.spoutspringsskiresort.com, or by calling.
Following is Spout Springs schedule for the remainder of the winter.
A water spout formed this morning in a thunderstorm over Lake Pontchartrain east of the Causeway bridge about 9:45 am It lasted about 15 minutes and gave Causeway travelers a sight to behold.
Water spout sighting at sun rise.
Water Spout Click to enlarge.
What Is This Nonsense That Warren Buffett Is Spouting About Taxes On Investment.
Mexican authorities have raised the threat level as Popocatepetl is continuing to spout gases and hot rock fragments and is dusting towns on its flanks with volcanic ash.
Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano spouting ash.
People Are Spouting Nonsense about Chinese Manufacturing.
Geraghty's not spouting buzz-words, he's grinding through the details.
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In science:

The potential spout edge rin = rpot , where the effective potential forms a selfcrossing Roche lobe, and accretion is governed by the Roche lobe overflow.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
The potential difference between the horizon and the spout is infinite, and therefore no external force can prevent the matter located there from plunging into the BH.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
The location of the potential spout inner edge rpot is shown in Fig. 4.14 for α = 0.01.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
We note that for low accretion rates, (e.g., ˙m . 0.6 for a∗ = 0), the location of the potential spout inner edge coincides with ISCO.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
At ˙m ≈ 0.6, the location of the potential spout jumps to a new position, which is close to the radius of the innermost bound circular orbit, rIBCO = 4M.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
The dashed line shows the location of the potential spout inner edge rpot .
Slim accretion disks around black holes
Table 4.1: Inner edges of a slim accretion disk: rpot - potential spout, rson - sonic radius, rvar - variability edge, rstr - stress edge, rrad - radiation edge, rref - reflection edge.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
For high accretion rates the flow is super-Keplerian between the “center” of the disk at rcen and the “potential spout” at rpot .
Slim accretion disks around black holes
The Keplerian profile is crossed again at a point located inside the marginally stable orbit, and corresponding to what is usually called “the cusp” or “the potential spout”.
Slim accretion disks around black holes
The author explained the spouting effect discovered in 1938 by J.
Thermo- and gas-dynamical processes in NPPs after accidents
Hence we have the same picture of the zeroth-order phase transition and the spouting effect for a weakly nonideal Bose gas in the Bogolybov model.
Thermo- and gas-dynamical processes in NPPs after accidents
Phase transition in the superfluid state and the spouting effect,” Vestnik Moskov.
Thermo- and gas-dynamical processes in NPPs after accidents
Maslov, “On a weakly nonideal Bose gas model leading to the spouting effect,” Teoret.
Thermo- and gas-dynamical processes in NPPs after accidents
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