splotch

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v splotch blotch or spot
    • n splotch an irregularly shaped spot
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Splotch splŏch A spot; a stain; a daub.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n splotch A broad, ill-defined spot; a stain; a daub; a smear.
    • splotch To soil with splotches; cause to look splotchy.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Splotch sploch a large spot, a stain
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. Splash

Usage

In literature:

There he sat, a splotch of black in a heap of white, and he presented such a funny picture that Sue and her brother burst out laughing.
"Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Sunny South" by Laura Lee Hope
Already ahead of them Arcot and Morey could see the great splotch of color that was Chicago, the mightiest city of Earth.
"The Black Star Passes" by John W Campbell
Which might mean his visitor had recently arrived, or else merely that a splotch of spray had landed there not too long before.
"Storm Over Warlock" by Andre Norton
He wore an open jacket, with a splotch of tar on the sleeve, a red and black check shirt, dungaree trousers, and heavy boots badly worn.
"The Strand Magazine, Volume V, Issue 28, April 1893" by Various
Mr. Murphy dropped the carver and fork, and made a splotch of gravy on the table.
"The Corner House Girls at School" by Grace Brooks Hill
There was a splotch of blood upon his long white beard.
"A Desert Drama Being The Tragedy Of The "Korosko"" by A. Conan Doyle
They were streaked and splotched in the most curious way.
"The Secret Wireless" by Lewis E. Theiss
It was vaguely splotched with different degrees of darkness, where fields and pastures and woodland copses stood.
"The Pirates of Ersatz" by Murray Leinster
It had in it three pale-blue eggs splotched with light brown.
"Once a Week" by Alan Alexander Milne
Behind each of these were thousands of little yellow splotches.
"Tam O' The Scoots" by Edgar Wallace
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In poetry:

Then came I into a certain field
Where the devil's paint-brush spread
'Mid the gray and green of the rolling hills
A flaring splotch of red,—
An evil omen, a bloody sign,
And a token of many dead.
"The Red Flower" by Henry Van Dyke

In news:

A splotch of turquoise is really one of the alligator rivers in Australia's Kakadu National Park.
The abstract painter Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) is widely known for his spectacular, wall-sized paintings, which typically feature a combination of swirling drips, bright splotches, and bold, rhythmic streaks.
Some of the larger splotches of map-like, gray-green lichens on the boulders around your home may well have been there for a thousand or more years.
Wood lily (Lilium philadelphicum) has bright orange-red petals with deep purple splotches.
A few days ago, Richards, who lives near Houston, told a local TV news station she saw the image of Christ in a splotch of green mold on the wall above her tub.
Sure there are generic patterns like the original WWII woodland splotch and blotch with greens and browns.
See that bright red hawthorn fruit and that splotch of scarlet leaves on the maple tree beginning to turn.
A bit farther out along the galaxy's disk you can see a dark splotch: That's the Coal Sack, a cloud of dust about 30 light years or so across and about 600 light years away.
It wasn't long before splotches, speckles and streaks of red, white and pink found their way on some solid colored plants.
The imagery, which was posted to NASA 's website on Wednesday, shows the planet bathed in cool blue, with city lights radiating out in sinewy yellow splotches.
And the green needles of the Aureovariegata variety of arborvitae are randomly splotched with yellow.
When it scratches or tears, a red splotch forms around the "wound," marking the site.
It prevents the early arrival of dark splotches, wrinkles, and extreme dryness—as well as skin cancer.
Rosacea, a skin condition that produces red facial splotches and sometimes disfiguration of the nose, doesn't discriminate on the basis of fame.
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