spirochete

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n spirochete parasitic or free-living bacteria; many pathogenic to humans and other animals
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Usage

In literature:

Hereditarily syphilitic children are filled with the spirochetes, the germs of the disease.
"The Third Great Plague" by John H. Stokes
Whatever in nature produced the peacock produced the itch-mite; whatever produced man produced the spirochete of syphilis.
"The Necessity of Atheism" by Dr. D.M. Brooks
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In news:

The Pilgrims Should Have Been Thankful for a Spirochete.
Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum.
Not all ticks are carriers of this disease, however, a large proportion of ticks in the New England states, Wisconsin, and Minnesota are infected with the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.
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In science:

Salmonella and E. coli, aerial hyphae in actynomycetes, bacterial shape in spirochetes, horns, tendrils, vines, screws, springs, helical staircases and sea shells (helico-spiral structures) [8, 9].
Position vectors of a spacelike general helices in Minkowski Space $\e_1^3$
The flagella of spirochetes lie in the thin periplasmic space between the inner and outer cell membranes .
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
The flagellar motors are embedded in the cell wall at both poles of the elongated body of the spirochete, and the flagellar filaments emerge from the motor and wrap around the body.
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
Other spirochetes, such as Treponema primitia, do not change shape at all as they swim, and it is thought that motility develops due to rotation of the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane in opposite senses [43, 47].
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
Spirochetes such as Leptospiracaeae have internal flagella that wrap around the periplasmic space between the cell body and an outer sheath.
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
Bacteria also encounter viscoelastic fluids: The ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus lining the stomach [259], and spirochetes move through the connective tissue of the host during infection [260].
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
Improvement in motion efficiency of the spirochete Brachyspira pilosicoli in viscous environments.
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
Multiple-exposure photographic analysis of a motile spirochete.
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
The flagellar cytoskeleton of the spirochetes. J.
The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms
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