sodium carbonate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n sodium carbonate a sodium salt of carbonic acid; used in making soap powders and glass and paper
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Sodium carbonate a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, and Trona.
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Usage

In literature:

Pour a little cod-liver oil into a test tube; add a few drops of a dilute solution of sodium carbonate.
"A Practical Physiology" by Albert F. Blaisdell
Sodium hydrogen carbonate hinders far less the commencement of nitrification.
"Scientific American Supplement, Vol. XIX, No. 470, Jan. 3, 1885" by Various
In the apparatus which we are about to describe, the acid carbonate of sodium is used.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 561, October 2, 1886" by Various
The saving in lime is stated to be one ton for each ton of sodium carbonate produced, or in cash value about 10s.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887" by Various
During the fermentation it is necessary to neutralize the acetic acid formed with sodium or calcium carbonate.
"Creative Chemistry" by Edwin E. Slosson
Sodium carbonate 3 drs.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 1178, June 25, 1898" by Various
Heated with carbonate of Globules of metallic mercury are sodium in a reduction-tube produced.
"Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology" by W. G. Aitchison Robertson
When this is treated with a solution of sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate is precipitated and borax crystallizes from the solution.
"An Elementary Study of Chemistry" by William McPherson
It is not as strong in its action as is sodium carbonate.
"Human Foods and Their Nutritive Value" by Harry Snyder
In most cases Sodium Carbonate, which it strongly resembles, can be used in its place.
"Vegetable Dyes" by Ethel M. Mairet
Sodium carbonate, saturated aqueous solution.
"The Elements of Bacteriological Technique" by John William Henry Eyre
As soon as the solution of arsenic is complete, dilute to about 4 gallons, add the sodium carbonate, and stir until dissolved.
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
We could only bathe their eyes with a sodium bi-carbonate solution, and use the sag-paste freely.
"History of Ambulance Company Number 139" by Various
Saturated solution of sodium carbonate 60 gr.
"The Mechanism of Life" by Stéphane Leduc
BARIL'LA, is the commercial name for impure sodium carbonate imported from Spain and the Levant.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 3" by Various
These consist of sodium carbonate, sodium chloride or common salt and sometimes lime.
"Soap-Making Manual" by E. G. Thomssen
The residue in the filter is ignited and fused with a little sodium carbonate and nitrate, or with sodium peroxide.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 7" by Various
Iron, nickel, calcium, manganese, sodium, cobalt, and carbon are among the elements most strongly identified.
"Astronomy" by David Todd
Neither carbonic acid nor sodium showed any indications of their presence in the planet's spectrum.
"Astronomical Curiosities" by J. Ellard Gore
Sodium carbonate (pure) 8 ozs.
"The Barnet Book of Photography" by Various
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In science:

At these temperatures, hot jupiter atmosphere models predict a clear, dark atmosphere, dominated by absorption by neutral sodium and potassium in the visible, and molecular bands of water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane in the infrared (Fortney et al. 2008).
The prevalence of dust on the exoplanet HD 189733b from Hubble and Spitzer observations
Transmission spectroscopy during transits has allowed to detect absorption features in the spectrum of HD 209458 which are indicative of the presence of various constituents in the planet’s atmosphere, notably sodium, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon (Charbonneau et al. 2002; Vidal-Madjar et al. 2003, 2004).
Astrometric Methods and Instrumentation to Identify and Characterize Extrasolar Planets: A Review
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