sight-read

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v sight-read perform music from a score without having seen the score before "He is a brilliant pianist but he cannot sightread"
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Quotations

  • Edna Ferber
    Edna Ferber
    “Writers should be read but not seen. Rarely are they a winsome sight.”

Usage

In literature:

But there is one soldier who cannot read their thanks, who is spared the sight of their pity.
"With the French in France and Salonika" by Richard Harding Davis
Wiping them away before going on to read more, she caught sight of the date.
"Four Ghost Stories" by Mrs. Molesworth
But more grateful still to him was the sight of people everywhere reading the Scriptures and the Prayer Book.
"A History of the English Church in New Zealand" by Henry Thomas Purchas
Besides her regular studies Massart advised Camilla to join a quartette in order to perfect herself in reading music at sight.
"Camilla: A Tale of a Violin" by Charles Barnard
Before losing her sight Maren had taught Ditte to read, which came in very useful now.
"Ditte: Girl Alive!" by Martin Andersen Nexo
Most of the Bible I can read slowly and at sight.
"James Gilmour of Mongolia" by James Gilmour
How much more we all learn from sight, from reading, than from the dictionary!
"Elizabeth Gilbert and Her Work for the Blind" by Frances Martin
Teresina could read everything at sight, and the accuracy of her time was incomparable.
"The Serapion Brethren," by Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
None of these have I been able to read, because my sight has failed me very much lately.
"Jan Vedder's Wife" by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr
Antiquated and complicated systems of sight reading are responsible for many poor readers.
"What Every Singer Should Know" by Millie Ryan
Malham, looking on, read into the sight a simile with his own life.
"What a Man Wills" by Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
He had caught sight of the inscription of the stone and was reading it.
"The Eye of Wilbur Mook" by H. B. Hickey
The boards were hung around the great hall in plain sight of the reporters, who copied the legends, that all America might read.
"H. R." by Edwin Lefevre
One blinked at reading it, as if dazzled by the sight of mountains of gold, and moreover every word of it was true.
"The Book of Buried Treasure" by Ralph D. Paine
She should be taught sight reading, and she ought to be able to read any melody as easily as she would read a book.
"Great Singers on the Art of Singing" by James Francis Cooke
Dan disbelieved wholly in a book that told how to read characters at sight.
"The Voice of the Pack" by Edison Marshall
The parson read somethin' about the day you die bein' a darned sight better 'n the day you was born.
"Alec Lloyd, Cowpuncher" by Eleanor Gates
This was a system of reading by sight.
"Electricity and Magnetism" by Elisha Gray
He said to me: 'Antonine, my sight is very weak; read this letter to me, please.
"Luxury-Gluttony:" by Eugène Sue
Alicia was reading a book by the fireplace but at sight of Penny and Rosanna she coldly withdrew.
"Penny Nichols and the Mystery of the Lost Key" by Joan Clark
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In poetry:

"That noble servant in my sight
Whom strength and grace adorn,
Announces, if I read aright,
A master nobly born."
"The Hermit's Dog" by William Hayley
I'll read the histories of thy love,
And keep thy laws in sight,
While through the promises I rove,
With ever fresh delight.
"Psalm 119 part 8" by Isaac Watts
Only the poet reads her right,
Because he reads with heart, not eyes:
He bares his being in her sight,
And mirrors all her mysteries.
"Nature And the Book" by Alfred Austin
"'Twas seen how the French watch-fires that night
Glowed still and steadily;
And the Three rejoiced, for they read in the sight
That the One disdained to flee….
"Leipzig" by Thomas Hardy
He alone life's ills can right.
Each His tender pity needs;
None are hidden from His sight;
"Every tear," the promise reads--
Every tear shall cease to flow,
Cease, likewise, the cause of woe.
""He Shall Wipe Away Every Tear"" by Joseph Horatio Chant
"Have you e'er learned to read?" said the hen to the sparrow,
"No, madam," he answered, "I can't say I have."
"Then that is the reason your sight is so narrow,"
The old hen replied, with a look very grave.
"The Sparrow And The Hen" by Charles Lamb

In news:

"I have the joy of teaching braille music basic to sighted professionals and braille music reading will soon happen for Braille readers," Sorge said.
Partway through David Herskovits's new production of Uncle Vanya (now playing at Here), a performer walks around, ring-girl style, with a placard that reads "Time Passes"—reducing the terrible essence of Chekhov's dramaturgy to a sight gag.
Read about how spider web filaments were used as crosshairs for telescopic sights, and the "Spider Lady," Mary Pfeiffer, who ran K&E's spider ranch from 1889 to World War II.
The Importance of Being Able to Sight Read.
This week's long-form good reads look at 'out of sight, out of mind' environmental costs of energy extraction, animals' 'moral' behavior, and the hard work of a luxury repo man.
Whether sighted or blind, most people are familiar with Braille, the system of raised characters that allow the visually impaired to "read" using their fingertips instead of their eyes.
From 1985 to 1991, Cotter studied privately, learning rock, blues, and jazz styles as well as theory, sight reading, and improvisation.
This week's long-form good reads look at 'out of sight, out of mind' environmental costs of energy extraction, animals' ' moral ' behavior, and the hard work of a luxury repo man.
When I read her description of this classic campus novel, it was love at first sight.
I read a story once about a near-sighted writer who, after having been engrossed in his writing for hours, took a break to rest his eyes.
Ever since I read about local fox sightings in Dr Allen Benton's OBSERVER nature column years ago, I had hoped to see one myself.
So far the rain amounts in the Fargo area have not been that impressive, but it may be just enough to green up the grass in ditches Read the article: Friday rains a welcome sight across the region.
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