scrummage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n scrummage (rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Scrummage See Scrimmage.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n scrummage Same as scrimmage.
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Usage

In literature:

And in front of us all the big fellows play, and that's where the scrummages are mostly.
"Tom Brown's Schooldays" by Thomas Hughes
They had a right smart little scrummage, and I know the colored people ran off and went to Kansas.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume II, Arkansas Narratives, Part 2" by Work Projects Administration
He got in a scrummage you know.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves" by Work Projects Administration
Look here, Master Fred, are we going to have another scrummage?
"Crown and Sceptre" by George Manville Fenn
And in front of us all the big fellows play, and that's where the scrummages are mostly.
"Tom Brown's School Days" by Thomas Hughes
And in front of us all the big fellows play, and that's where the scrummages are mostly.
"Tom Brown at Rugby" by Thomas Hughes
In the twinkling of an eye it was broached, and fifty backs were shoving round it like a football scrummage.
"Some Experiences of an Irish R.M." by E. OE. Somerville
The pain was considerable, and when dragged from the scrummage he was in a half-fainting condition.
"The Lighter Side of School Life" by Ian Hay
This was the origin of the scrummage.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 10, Slice 5" by Various
There were absolutely no regular positions; the man who was in the front centre of one scrummage might be in the outskirts of the next.
"An American at Oxford" by John Corbin
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In news:

Scrummage is on first.
But the sport's governing body, the International Rugby Board (IRB), is confident that new scrummaging laws will go some way to curtailing chronic neck injuries.
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