scarab

Definitions

  • Featuring a winged scarab design
    Featuring a winged scarab design
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n scarab scarabaeid beetle considered divine by ancient Egyptians
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Scarab (Egyptian Archæology, Jewelry) A stylized representation of a scarab beetle carved in stone or faience, or made in baked clay, usually in a conventionalized form in which the beetle has its legs held closely at its sides, and commonly having an inscription on the flat underside; -- a symbol of resurrection, used by the ancient Egyptians as an ornament or a talisman, and in modern times used in jewelry, usually by engraving the formalized scarab design on cabuchon stones. Also used attributively; as, a scarab bracelet [a bracelet containing scarabs]; a ring with a scarabthe carved stone itelf.
    • Scarab (Zoöl) Any one of numerous species of lamellicorn beetles of the genus Scarabæus, or family Scarabæidæ, especially the sacred, or Egyptian, species (Scarabæus sacer, and Scarabæus Egyptiorum).
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n scarab A beetle. It was supposed to be bred in and to feed on dung; hence the name was often applied opprobriously to persons. See dung-beetle, tumblebug, and cuts under Copris and Scarabæus.
    • n scarab In entomology, a coleopterous insect of the family Scarabæidæ, and especially of the genus Scarabæus; a scarabæid or scarabæoid.
    • n scarab A gem, usually emerald, green feldspar, or obsidian, cut in the form of a beetle and engraved on the under face, common among the ancient Egyptians as an amulet. Also scarabæus.
    • n scarab A conventionalized beetle, which is a common motive in Egyptian art.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Scarab skar′ab an insect with wing-sheaths, a beetle: a gem, usually emerald, cut in the form of a beetle—also Scarabæ′us, Scar′abee
    • adj Scarab like a scarab
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. scarabaeus,; cf. F. scarabée,

Usage

In literature:

On either side of this the beetle or scarab was repeated.
"As It Was in the Beginning" by Philip Verrill Mighels
Etruscans at first purchased the scarabs from Phoenicians, 140. borrowed the form of the scarab but did not care for the cult, 139.
"Scarabs" by Isaac Myer
Did not you see the two scarabs that lay upon your path?
"Woman on Her Own, False Gods & The Red Robe" by Eugène Brieux
Strange how ugliness is the mother of beauty, and the sacred fairy-winged scarab of Art comes forth from dirt.
"The Orchard of Tears" by Sax Rohmer
Uninscribed scarabs, in carnelian, amethyst, and jasper, were not uncommon.
"El Kab" by J.E. Quibell
She's all over strange jewels and scarabs, and uncut turquoises and things.
"The Twelfth Hour" by Ada Leverson
These scarabs, as they are called, are bought and worn in rings and ornaments by visitors.
"Round the Wonderful World" by G. E. Mitton
That scarab was taken out of a tomb of the thirteenth dynasty.
"The Brass Bottle" by F. Anstey
To the Scarab came new friends for Sigurd with new caresses, to which he always made cordial and courteous response.
"Sigurd Our Golden Collie and Other Comrades of the Road" by Katharine Lee Bates
It was used for vases, but more generally for small figures and scarabs (6).
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 6" by Various
Next came a black and white Egyptian scarab, and then, of all things, a snuff-box.
"The Man Who Couldn't Sleep" by Arthur Stringer
Gordon's eyes, even during this brief conversation, had never left Martha, whose attention was given to her scarabs.
"A Star for a Night" by Elsie Janis
Also the scarab men and flies were especially bad just there.
"The Ship Dwellers" by Albert Bigelow Paine
Lonnegan must have a scarab, or a coin two thousand years old; same thing in his dress, if you study him.
"The Wood Fire in No. 3" by F. Hopkinson Smith
Death ye rude Rogues, ye Scarabe's.
"The Mad Lover" by Francis Beaumont
I think it was my action of soothingly patting her upon the shoulder that drew Chundermeyer's attention to my Hatshepsu scarab.
"Tales of Secret Egypt" by Sax Rohmer
Large numbers of Hyksos scarabs are found in Upper and Lower Egypt, and they are not unknown in Palestine.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 2" by Various
The scarab-like aeroplane whirred out of sight.
"The Outrage" by Annie Vivanti
The Prophet hath given me grace to sell several statuettes and scarabs.
"Her Royal Highness" by William Le Queux
I love any thing Egyptian, and I have quite a lot of scarabs.
"The Broken Thread" by William Le Queux
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In news:

Founder Samuel Pott's new piece "Scarabs" was inspired by two tales including Franz Kafka's "Metamorphosis," in which a man leading a mundane life supporting his family wakes up one day as a beetle.
Scarab Seshambeh Project 5 Seshambeh Project, the.
Scarabs were common charms in ancient Egypt, representing the journey of the sun across the sky and the cycle of life.
CellMed to Leverage Scarab Genomics' Clean Genome E. Biotechnology from bench to business.
IPhone App ' Scarab ' Reinvents the Literary Journal.
It's called Scarab , and its goal is to reinvent the literary journal.
On a recent evening at Scarabée , as I sat over a plate of grilled baby octopus, black-olive bruschetta and a lemony escabèche of fennel and peppers served with a curried balsamic vinaigrette, I thought of Elizabeth David.
In July 1960, Carroll Shelby and Old Yeller were on Elkhart's front row with Augie Pabst's Scarab.
They have their membership clubs - the Scarabs, Bottle Rockets, Mods & Knockers, et al.
Knowing the secrets of how my Gatorbait - a 32-foot Wellcraft Scarab - and boats like it on the SKA circuit rig for success can help anyone catch more and larger kings.
Unearthed scarab proves Egyptians were in Tel Aviv.
Unearthed scarab proves Egyptians were in Tel Aviv .
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