salol

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n salol a white powder with a pleasant taste and odor; used to absorb light in sun tan lotions or as a preservative or an antiseptic or a coating for pills in which the medicine is intended for enteric release
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Salol (Chem) A white crystalline substance consisting of phenol salicylate.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n salol Phenyl salicylate, C6H4.OHCO2.C6H5, a salicylic ether forming odorless crystals. It is used as an antiseptic, and internally as a substitute for salicylic acid, being less irritating to the stomach.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Salicylic, + -ol,

Usage

In literature:

Massage was begun again, strychnia and salol were administered, and a short course of full doses of the testicular fluid was given.
"Fat and Blood" by S. Weir Mitchell
Other soaps, containing the phenol group, which are well known are resorcinol soap, salol soap, thymol soap, naphthol soap, etc.
"Soap-Making Manual" by E. G. Thomssen
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In news:

Gary and Lois Kallstrom of Bemidji announce the engagement of their daughter, Sarah Torgeson, to Jason Dahl of Rolla, N.D. Jason is the son of Dale and Julie Dahl of Salol, Minn.
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In science:

Though one observes the expected power law behaviour of the viscosity in many liquids (Taborek et al 1986), accurate dielectric data in salol show a temperature dependence of the power law exponent of τα even well above Tc (Stickel et al 1995).
Energy landscape - a key concept for the dynamics of glasses and liquids
We analyze light scattering, dielectric, calorimetric and dilatometric measurements of three prototype glass formers, orthoterphenyl, salol, and glycerol.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
Our method is tested on three different prototype glass formers, orthoterphenyl, salol, and glycerol and for relaxation data, obtained by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
In the following we consider three model glass-formers: orthoterphenyl (OTP), phenyl salycilate (salol), and glycerol.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
Salol.— Precise determination of the heat capacity of salol under atmospheric pressure is due to Oguni .
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
Because of the not very high quality of the data, and with the background of the analysis of OTP and salol in place, we undertake the fit procedure with (∂ V /∂ T )vibr constrained to a physical value.
Can experiments select the configurational component of excess entropy?
It is shown that this scenario explains the optical-Kerr-effect data measured for salol and benzophenone (BZP).
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
The OKE response of salol was studied by Hinze et. al, and the data were shown to be consistent with the known MCT scaling-law formulas for the temperature decreasing from 340K to 266K .
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
The preceding results shall be demonstrated in a simple schematic model for two different cases where the model parameters are adjusted to reproduce the data measured for benzophenone (BZP) and salol [9, 10, 12] The simplest MCT models deal with a single correlation function only.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
Five OKE response functions measured for salol and fits by the functions cA (t ) of the above explained schematic model are reproduced in Fig. 4.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
For salol, as opposed to BZP, the minimum position decreases strongly with decreasing |e|, in qualitative agreement with the first-scaling-law results.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
FIG. 9: Asymptotic description of the minimum in salol.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
The full line reproduces the salol loss spectrum for T = 247K from Fig. 6 and the dashed one exhibits the spectrum of the extended Cole-Cole susceptibility, Eq. (32a).
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
Different from the case for BZP, the lowest temperature available for salol, T = 247K, is described by a much smaller distance parameter, e ≈ 0.01, and therefore shares a larger frequency regime, say w . 0.1ps−1 , with the critical loss spectrum, see the lower panel of Fig. 6.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
While the leading-order result alone is not sufficient to describe the measured data quantitatively, the power-law expansion in Eq. (11a) yields a satisfactory description that is superior to the Cole-Cole solution . (2) If wc q is close to t −1 mic , one encounters a scenario demonstrated in Fig. 9 for salol.
The Cole-Cole Law for Critical Dynamics in Glass-Forming Liquids
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