ridge

Definitions

  • Along the Chalk Ridge.—Leith Hill in the Distance
    Along the Chalk Ridge.—Leith Hill in the Distance
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v ridge form into a ridge
    • v ridge spade into alternate ridges and troughs "ridge the soil"
    • v ridge throw soil toward (a crop row) from both sides "He ridged his corn"
    • v ridge plough alternate strips by throwing the furrow onto an unploughed strip
    • v ridge extend in ridges "The land ridges towards the South"
    • n ridge a beam laid along the edge where two sloping sides of a roof meet at the top; provides an attachment for the upper ends of rafters
    • n ridge any long raised border or margin of a bone or tooth or membrane
    • n ridge a long narrow natural elevation or striation
    • n ridge a long narrow range of hills
    • n ridge a long narrow natural elevation on the floor of the ocean
    • n ridge any long raised strip
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

THE HICKORY RIDGE BOY SCOUTS THE HICKORY RIDGE BOY SCOUTS

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The greatest mountain range is the Mid-Ocean Ridge, extending 64,374 km from the Arctic Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean
    • Ridge A raised line or strip, as of ground thrown up by a plow or left between furrows or ditches, or as on the surface of metal, cloth, or bone, etc.
    • Ridge A range of hills or mountains, or the upper part of such a range; any extended elevation between valleys. "The frozen ridges of the Alps.""Part rise crystal wall, or ridge direct."
    • Ridge The back, or top of the back; a crest.
    • Ridge (Fort) The highest portion of the glacis proceeding from the salient angle of the covered way.
    • Ridge (Arch) The intersection of two surface forming a salient angle, especially the angle at the top between the opposite slopes or sides of a roof or a vault.
    • Ridge To form a ridge of; to furnish with a ridge or ridges; to make into a ridge or ridges. "Bristles ranged like those that ridge the back
      Of chafed wild boars."
    • Ridge To form into ridges with the plow, as land.
    • Ridge To wrinkle. "With a forehead ridged ."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: A dime has 118 ridges around the edge
    • n ridge The back of any animal; especially, the upper or projecting part of the back of a quadruped.
    • n ridge Any extended protuberance; a projecting line or strip; a long and narrow pile sloping at the sides; specifically, a long elevation of land, or the summit of such an elevation; an extended hill or mountain.
    • n ridge In agriculture, a strip of ground thrown up by a plow or left between furrows; a bed of ground formed by furrow-slices running the whole length of the field, varying in breadth according to circumstances, and divided from another by gutters or open furrows, parallel to each other, which last serve as guides to the hand and eye of the sower, to the reapers, and also for the application of manures in a regular manner. In wet soils they also serve as drains for carrying off the surface-water. In Wales, formerly, a measure of land, 20 ¼ feet.
    • n ridge The highest part of the roof of a building; specifically, the meeting of the upper ends of the rafters. When the upper ends of the rafters abut against a horizontal piece of timber, it is called a ridgepole. Ridge also denotes the internal angle or nook of a vault. See cut under roof.
    • n ridge In fortification, the highest portion of the glacis, proceeding from the salient angle of the covered way.
    • n ridge In anatomy and zoology, a prominent border; an elevated line, or crest; a lineal protuberance: said especially of rough elevations on bones for muscular or ligamentous attachments: as, the superciliary, occipital, mylohyoid, condylar, etc., ridges.
    • n ridge A succession of small processes along the small abaft the hump of a sperm-whale, or the top of the back just forward of the small. The ridge is thickest just around the hump. See scrag-whale.
    • n ridge One of the several linear elevations of the lining membrane of the roof of a horse's mouth, more commonly called bars. Similar ridges occur on the hard palate of most mammals.
    • ridge To cover or mark with ridges; rib.
    • ridge To rise or stretch in ridges.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The ridges on the sides of coins are called reeding or milling.
    • n Ridge rij the back, or top of the back: anything like a back, as a long range of hills: an extended protuberance: a crest: the earth thrown up by the plough between the furrows, a breadth of ground running the whole length of the field, divided from those on either side by broad open furrows, helping to guide the sowers and reapers and effecting drainage in wet soils: the upper horizontal timber of a roof: the highest portion of a glacis
    • v.t Ridge to form into ridges: to wrinkle
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. rigge, the back, AS. hrycg,; akin to D. rug, G. rÜcken, OHG. rucki, hrukki, Icel. hryggr, Sw. rugg, Dan. ryg,. √16

Usage

In literature:

Once we stole an afternoon and climbed a ridge that looked across a valley to other ridges swept by the flame of autumn.
"Dwellers in Arcady" by Albert Bigelow Paine
It runs along a ridge, and yet it is sunk deep between two very high banks.
"Highways and Byways in Surrey" by Eric Parker
Two shells struck the house and tore about two inches off the tile ridge at intervals of about ten feet apart.
"The Red Watch" by J. A. Currie
When you have the two sides covered, put bark over the ridge as shown in Fig.
"Shelters, Shacks and Shanties" by D.C. Beard
Then he climbed once more into the saddle and faced the ridge, debating with himself what was the right course to pursue.
"The Young Ranchers" by Edward S. Ellis
His way led straight back across the ridge to the spring and thence down to the shelter on the north shore.
"The Black Buccaneer" by Stephen W. Meader
They were rocks, great, black, forbidding boulders standing there on a narrow ridge, having a diabolic likeness to houses.
"Sawtooth Ranch" by B. M. Bower
He saw two more banners rising above the crest of a bare ridge to the west.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
When you reach the bottom of the ravine you do not find a level piece of ground, but ascend another ridge.
"My Days and Nights on the Battle-Field" by Charles Carleton Coffin
Below that there's a long ridge or series of broken water.
"The Young Alaskans on the Trail" by Emerson Hough
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In poetry:

I sat and waited through evenings long
And scanned the ridge with the spruces yonder;
But darkening mountains made shadows throng,
And you the way did not wander.
"Synnove's Song" by Bjornstjerne Bjornson
Why are the ridges forever waiting?
Ridges that waited ere one man came,
Still by the towns with their life vibrating
Lonely ridges that wait the same.
Ridges and gullies without a name.
"Sheoaks That Sigh When The Wind Is Still" by Henry Lawson
God is enough! thou, who in hope and fear
Toilest through desert-sands of life, sore tried,
Climb trustful over death's black ridge, for near
The bright wells shine: thou wilt be satisfied.
"The Afternoon" by Edwin Arnold
WHEN I'se been by Tiber an' when I'se been by Seine,
Listenin' theer messages, I lang to hear agen
Secrets of home-watters, born amang moor-sedges,
Fallin' doon like sparklin' ale ower steean ridges.
"Yorkshire Five (Aire, Wharfe, Nidd, Ure and Swale)" by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe
And on the ridge of Braxton hill the Scottish army lay,
All beautifully arrayed, and eager for the fray,
And near by stood their noble king on that eventful day,
With a sad and heavy heart, but in it no dismay.
"The Battle of Flodden Field" by William Topaz McGonagall
Now still from the ridges, by ways that are dark,
Come the shingles and palings they call stringy-bark;
Though you ride through long gullies a twelve months you’ll see
But the old whitened stumps of the stringy-bark tree.
"The Stringy-Bark Tree" by Henry Lawson

In news:

When traveling south on the Blue Ridge Parkway, milepost 467 marks the end of the road.
Chardonnay Sonoma Coast Camp Meeting Ridge 2010.
Ira DuBrow, right, a pediatric cardiologist at Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital in Park Ridge, discusses test results with Owen Kopka, 11,and his parents, Wendy and Steve Kopka.
In Thursday's final round at Quail Ridge, Noah Edmondson made six birdies and an eagle — his third of the tournament.
I'm standing next to a ridge, looking at the Syrian town of Salaqin.
Calvin Cates , age 80, of the Austin community passed away Thursday, Sept 20, 2012, in Center Ridge, Ark.
Makin' tracks: Brundage chairlift rides, Eagle Ridge Trail and July 4th camping.
This story originally ran in the Monday, January 11, 2010 edition of the Blue Ridge Business Journal.
John Ross, left, and Major Ridge teamed up to protect Cherokee holdings in what is now Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee.
Cider Mill Ridge is place to call home.
SAB Homes, one of the two builders at Cider Mill Ridge, has two new models, the Merion and the Ashcliffe, and is updating the award-winning Augusta plan.
Couple praise builder, Cider Mill Ridge location.
K2 Home Builders offers two models at Cider Mill Ridge, one a ranch plan and the other a two-story plan.
Cider Mill Ridge at The National.
Coal mining may return to Walden's Ridge.
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In science:

One possibility is that this ridge is an ionization/shock front, seen nearly edge on.
HST study of the LMC compact star forming region N83B
It is also possible that the ridge in fact results from the interaction of the winds of both stars #29 and #10.
HST study of the LMC compact star forming region N83B
Notice the characteristic log-normal tapering of the ridge as a function of z , and the nearly Gaussian distribution in θ around θ = 0.
Products of Random Matrices
We also find evidence for a ridge feature, probably associated with the superwind interacting with an HI streamer.
First Look XMM-Newton EPIC Observations of the Prototypical Starburst Galaxy M82
Similar ridge like features in the X-ray emission from superwinds have been seen in NGC 253 for example (Strickland et al. 2000).
First Look XMM-Newton EPIC Observations of the Prototypical Starburst Galaxy M82
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