rice

Definitions

  • The Rice Gets the Bulge 061
    The Rice Gets the Bulge 061
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v rice sieve so that it becomes the consistency of rice "rice the potatoes"
    • n rice grains used as food either unpolished or more often polished
    • n Rice United States playwright (1892-1967)
    • n Rice English lyricist who frequently worked with Andrew Lloyd Webber (born in 1944)
    • n rice annual or perennial rhizomatous marsh grasses; seed used for food; straw used for paper
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: A human embryo is smaller than a grain of rice at four weeks old
    • n Rice (Bot) A well-known cereal grass (Oryza sativa) and its seed. This plant is extensively cultivated in warm climates, and the grain forms a large portion of the food of the inhabitants. In America it grows chiefly on low, moist land, which can be overflowed.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Danishes are called Vienna cakes in Denmark, and Spanish rice is unknown in Spain.
    • n rice The grain of the rice-plant. It forms a larger part of human food than the product of any other one plant, being often an almost exclusive diet in India, China, and the Malayan islands, and abundantly used elsewhere. Over 75 per cent. of its substance consists of starchy matter, but it is deficient in albuminoids, the flesh-forming material, and is thus best adapted for use in warm climates. It is commonly prepared by boiling; in warm countries it is much employed in curries. Rice-flour, rice-glue, rice-starch, rice-sugar, and rice-water are made from it; the sake of the Japanese is brewed from rice, and one kind of true arrack is distilled from it.
    • n rice The rice-plant, Oryza sativa. It is a member of the grass family (see Oryza), native in India, also in northern Australia; extensively cultivated in India, China, Malaysia, Brazil, the southern United States, and somewhat in Italy and Spain. It has numerous natural and cultivated varieties, and ranges in height from 1 to 6 feet. It requires for ripening a temperature of from sixty to eighty degrees, and in general can be grown only on irrigable land (but see mountain-rice). Rice is one of the most prolific of all crops. It was introduced into South Carolina about 1700—it is said by chance. The finest quality is produced in the United States, South Carolina and Georgia leading in amount; but the production has considerably declined since the civil war.
    • n rice Rice produced in India.
    • n rice Another spelling of rise.
    • n rice A collapsible hexagonal reel upon which a hank of yarn is placed for winding on a bobbin.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In Chillicothe, Ohio it is illegal to throw rice at weddings.
    • n Rice rīs one of the most useful and extensively cultivated of grains, like oats when ripe
    • ***

Quotations

  • Chinese Proverb
    Chinese Proverb
    “Talk doesn't cook rice.”
  • Confucius
    Confucius
    “With coarse rice to eat, with water to drink, and my bent arm for a pillow -- I have still joy in the midst of all these things.”
  • Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
    Vladimir%20Ilyich%20Lenin
    “I am a bad, wicked man, but I am practicing moral self-purification; I don't eat meat any more, I now eat rice cutlets.”

Idioms

Rice missionary - A rice missionary gives food to hungry people as a way of converting them to Christianity.
***
Wouldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding - If something isn't powerful: This bus wouldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding.
***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. riz,cf. Pr. ris, It. riso,), L. oryza, Gr. , , probably from the Persian; cf. OPers. brīzi, akin to Skr. vrīhi,; or perh. akin to E. rye,. Cf. Rye
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. ris—L. oryza—Gr. oryza, from Old Pers., whence also Ar. uruzz, ruzz.

Usage

In literature:

Moisten with water a gill of rice flour, and mix it with the rubbed rice.
"365 Luncheon Dishes" by Anonymous
When done add freshly boiled rice and simmer till the rice has absorbed the seasoning from the meat.
"The Community Cook Book" by Anonymous
Rice, a pioneer teacher in Kanawha Valley who had completed his education at Hampton Institute.
"The Journal of Negro History, Volume 7, 1922" by Various
The grinding of flour and husking of rice are sometimes part of the same business.
"The Panjab, North-West Frontier Province, and Kashmir" by Sir James McCrone Douie
Rice requires plenty of warmth and moisture.
"Commercial Geography" by Jacques W. Redway
The afternoon ride was through a fertile country, rice and bananas being the principal products.
"Travels in the Far East" by Ellen Mary Hayes Peck
Do you know a place where the wild rice grows?
"Bird Stories" by Edith M. Patch
Put all in a rice boiler if you have it and cook slowly until the rice is done.
"The Khaki Kook Book" by Mary Kennedy Core
The sacks used on the India station for holding rice, biscuit, &c.; often as sand-bags in fortification.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
The aborigines set before us rice and beans.
"Adventures of a Young Naturalist" by Lucien Biart
***

In poetry:

For Spring Rice had to whisper it,
Being their Ambassador,
And then the speakers got it
And writers by the score.
"Roger Casement" by William Butler Yeats
Then, then it is I love to drift
Upon the flood-tide's lazy swirls,
While from the level rice fields lift
The spiritu'ls of darky girls.
"Carolina Spring Song" by William Hervey Allen Jr
Across the rice-lands, flooded deep,
The peasant peacefully wades on--
As, in unfurrowed vales of sleep,
A phantom out of voidness drawn.
"Maya" by Cale Young Rice
The autumn wind (In his ennui he blew cold)
Across the rice ears, (On our love)
So sad;
Empty of grain (My heart desolate)
Are they left.
"The autumn wind" by Ono no Komachi
Why, he heard from the dungeons, the rice-fields,
The dark holds of ships;
Every faint, feeble cry which oppression
Smothered down on men's lips.
"Abraham Lincoln" by Phoebe Cary
Whom shall we pray to for rice and for care?
Who can bring bread to this shit flood foul'd lair?
Millions of children alone in the rain!
Millions of children weeping in pain!
"September On Jessore Road" by Allen Ginsberg

In news:

3 cups cooked HINODE Microwavable Brown Rice .
2 cups dry brown rice 4 cups water 3 (16-oz.
Vegetable Fried Brown Rice .
Sesame Chicken over Brown Rice .
Cracking the code for a great brown rice risotto.
It can be sticky, so for salads I usually rinse the cooked rice with cold water before using.
12 Source: USA Rice Federation.
Cooked whole grain brown rice 1 1/2 c.
Tomato Brown Rice Paella with Peas and Cheddar.
1 cup long-grain brown rice .
Happy Birthday Susan Sarandon, Buster Keaton , Cromwell, Jackie Collins, Ann Rice and mothers2mothers.
Ordinarily Hoppin' John is made with beans and rice, but this version substitutes barley , a whole grain, for the white rice.
1 cup wild rice (3 cups cooked wild rice).
Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews.com.
OUR Rice is better than your Rice.
***

In science:

Conf., Rice Univ., Houston, Tex., 1972), Vol. I: Geometry of singularities” Rice Univ.
Rational polynomials of simple type
When applying Rice’s formula, it turns out that the dominant singularity is at z = 1.
Combinatorics of geometrically distributed random variables: Value and position of large left-to-right maxima
On the other hand this could be indicative of the formation of a Zhang-Rice polaron in (Ga,Mn)N as has been recently suggested23 .
Self-interaction effects in (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)N
These are the conditions for the formation of a Zhang-Rice polaron.
Self-interaction effects in (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)N
We will be first interested in the distribution of real zeros of fn(x), and our calculations will be based on the Kac-Rice formula.
Correlations between zeros of non-Gaussian random polynomials
***