rhizome

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n rhizome a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structure
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Bananas are perennial crops that are grown and harvested year-round. The banana plant does not grow from a seed but rather from a rhizome or bulb. Each fleshy bulb will sprout new shoots year after year.
    • n Rhizome (Bot) A rootstock. See Rootstock.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n rhizome In botany, a stem of root-like appearance, horizontal or oblique in position, lying on the ground or subterranean, bearing scales instead of leaves, and usually producing from its apex a leafy shoot or scape. Rhizomes may be slender, with wellmarked nodes, as in mints, couchgrass, etc., or thickened with stores of nutriment, as in species of iris, Solomon's-seal, etc. - in the latter case producing at the apex an annual bud which furnishes the aërial shoot of the next season, and gradually dying at the old end. Rhizomes shade off gradually into corms and bulbs on the one hand, and into tubers on the other. See these terms. Also rhizoma. See also cuts under arrowroot and moniliform.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Rhizome rī′zōm a root-stock, an underground stem when its shape is cylindrical, ending in a bud and bearing leaves or scales
    • Rhizome Also Rhizō′ma
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. the mass of roots (of a tree), a stem, race, fr. to make to root, pass., to take root, fr. a root: cf. F. rhizome,

Usage

In literature:

Jup was not forgotten, and he ate with relish some stonepine almonds and rhizome roots, with which he was abundantly supplied.
"The Mysterious Island" by Jules Verne
Many other examples of the conversion of foliage-shoots into runners and rhizomes, or vice versa, have been described by Goebel and others.
"Darwin and Modern Science" by A.C. Seward and Others
When you are here I shall be very curious to know whether they are roots or rhizomes.
"More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II" by Charles Darwin
A shows a portion of rhizome, natural size, and Fig.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 497, July 11, 1885" by Various
Rhizome short with membranous, orange or brown scales having a few bluntish teeth on each edge.
"The Fern Lover's Companion" by George Henry Tilton
The rhizome contains an acid resin and volatile oil, starch and gum.
"The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom" by P. L. Simmonds
VITIVERT, or Kus-Kus, is the rhizome of an Indian grass.
"The Art of Perfumery" by G. W. Septimus Piesse
Underground stems such as stolons and rhizomes occur in some grasses.
"A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses" by Rai Bahadur K. Ranga Achariyar
It may be in the form of bulb, corm, or rhizome.
"Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Nature Study" by Ontario Ministry of Education
They are the chief constituents of the fleshy parenchyma of fruits, tubers, rhizomes.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 5" by Various
Jup was not forgotten, and he ate with relish some stone-pine almonds and rhizome roots, with which he was abundantly supplied.
"Abandoned" by Jules Verne
They are floating or marsh plants, and many have edible fleshy rhizomes.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 1" by Various
The rhizomes when dug up are washed free of earthy impurities and afterwards skinned.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 6" by Various
Description of the Rhizome, or Rootstock.
"Ginseng and Other Medicinal Plants" by A. R. (Arthur Robert) Harding
In planting them, nearly cover the rhizomes.
"Garden Ornaments" by Mary H. Northend
The zoarium consists of groups of zooecia (or occasionally of single zooecia) joined together by an adherent rhizome.
"Freshwater Sponges, Hydroids & Polyzoa" by Nelson Annandale
The long tap-root has a simple or many-headed rhizome; it is black externally, and is very difficult of extirpation.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 9" by Various
It is no easy task to secure their deep-rooted rhizomes in the meadow.
"Old-Time Gardens" by Alice Morse Earle
Stems from a creeping rhizome.
"The Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States" by Asa Gray
For propagation cuttings of the rhizome may be taken in August, and placed in pans of light soil, with a bottom heat of 60 deg.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 2" by Various
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In news:

These popular rhizomes can be either perennial or biennial.
Lack of sun, nutrient deficiency, or rhizome rot could be the problem.
In this Monday, Oct 1, 2012 photo, farming director Sam Brake shows a "rhizome" from an Arundo donax plant in a test plot near the Biofuels Center of North Carolina in Oxford, N.C.
Ginger beer is a soft drink made with the rhizome that flavors many Asian cuisines.
Every year the Fresno Iris Society partners with the Fresno State Nursery for a rhizome and plant sale.
Bearded, beardless and crested irises , on the other hand, fall under the category of rhizome irises .
Dig up the iris bed, throwing away all the oldest of the rhizomes, or roots, saving only the firm newer ones.
Arturo Alvarez "Matali Crasset's Rhizome chandelier is?beyond fantastic- architectural but whimsical, too".
Thatch consists of dead and dying leaves, stems, stolons, rhizomes and roots.
The other option, and far more expensive, is to dig out the rhizomes with a power shovel .
Rhubarb , that ruby-stalked rhizome that adds a tantalizing tartness to dishes both sweet and savory, is among the handful of spring produce that, just like the blossoming flowers and trees, seem to vanish in the blink of an eye.
The various royal families were so intermarried that their family trees looked more like the rhizome root systems of a bamboo forest.
Named for a scarred rhizome that has the appearance of King Solomon 's seal, which is known by many as the Star of David.
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