revivification

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n revivification bringing again into activity and prominence "the revival of trade","a revival of a neglected play by Moliere","the Gothic revival in architecture"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Revivification Renewal of life; restoration of life; the act of recalling, or the state of being recalled, to life.
    • Revivification (Old Chem) The reduction of a metal from a state of combination to its metallic state.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n revivification Renewal of life; restoration to life; resuscitation.
    • n revivification In chem., the reduction of a metal from a state of combination to its metallic state.
    • n revivification In surgery, the dissection off of the skin or mucous membrane in a part or parts, that by the apposition of surfaces thus prepared union of parts may be secured.
    • n revivification The restoration to an effective condition (in which it can again be used to decolorize syrup in sugar-refining) of spent animal charcoal by reheating it in char-kilns, or by washing with hydrochloric acid, submitting to a kind of fermentation, and finally heating in the char-kiln.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Revivification (chem.) the reduction of a metal from a state of combination to its natural state
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. F. révivification,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. revivre—L. re-, again, vivĕre, to live.

Usage

In literature:

Gideon Spilett, who accompanied him, also heard these distant mutterings, which indicated a revivification of the subterranean fires.
"The Mysterious Island" by Jules Verne
This aptitude of revivification is found to a high degree in animalcules of low order.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 497, July 11, 1885" by Various
As a tonic and revivifer it is simply wonderful.
"The Bay State Monthly, Vol. II, No. 6, March, 1885" by Various
And here we come to the revivificating medicine.
"The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. XII. (of XII.)" by Edmund Burke
He'd have liked to know such a man before death and revivification had ruined him.
"The Sky Is Falling" by Lester del Rey
Had the revivification produced some disorder of the nervous system?
"The Man With The Broken Ear" by Edmond About
Gideon Spilett, who accompanied him, also heard these distant mutterings, which indicated a revivification of the subterranean fires.
"The Secret of the Island" by W.H.G. Kingston (translation from Jules Verne)
There is, first of all, the laughter of revivification and escape from death or danger.
"More Science From an Easy Chair" by Sir E. Ray (Edwin Ray) Lankester
He thought only of his mother and of her possible revivification.
"Victor Ollnee's Discipline" by Hamlin Garland
And this revivification may take place after months, or even years, of arrested life.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Slice 7" by Various
Simultaneously with the rise to prominence of John Keogh came the revivification of the Volunteers.
"The Viceroys of Ireland" by Charles O'Mahony
If the battery is worked harder, it will require more frequent revivification.
"Neuralgia and the Diseases that Resemble it" by Francis E. Anstie
Father Morolla's account of the revivification of a dead cock.
"Traditions, Superstitions and Folk-lore" by Charles Hardwick
***

In news:

But what would happen if the underlying macho-techno paradigm of the Towers was combined with its antithesis, an architecture of commemoration and revivification.
***