respiration

Definitions

  • persons in bed wearing respirators
    persons in bed wearing respirators
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n respiration the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic molecules; processes that take place in the cells and tissues during which energy is released and carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed by the blood to be transported to the lungs
    • n respiration the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
    • n respiration a single complete act of breathing in and out "thirty respirations per minute"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In turtles, the colon(intestine) is also used for respiration, as it takes in oxygen. Thats how they stay underwater for so long.
    • Respiration Interval; intermission.
    • Respiration Relief from toil or suffering: rest. "Till the day
      Appear of respiration to the just
      And vengeance to the wicked."
    • Respiration (Physiol) The act of resping or breathing; the act of taking in and giving out air; the aggregate of those processes bu which oxygen is introduced into the system, and carbon dioxide, or carbonic acid, removed.
    • Respiration The act of respiring or breathing again, or catching one's breath.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n respiration The act of breathing again or resuming life.
    • n respiration The inspiration and expiration of air.
    • n respiration That function by which there takes place an absorption of oxygen from the surrounding medium into the blood with a corresponding excretion of carbon dioxid. This is accomplished in the higher animal forms chiefly by the lungs and skin; the gills or branchiæ of aquatic animals and the tracheæ of insects perform the same function. In unicellular organisms these changes take place in the protoplasm of the cell itself. The number of respirations in the human adult is from 16 to 24 per minute. About 500 centimeters or one sixth of the volume of theair in the lungs is changed at each respiration, giving a daily income of about 744 grams of oxygen and an expenditure of 900 grains of carbon dioxid. Inspiration is slightly shorter than expiration.
    • n respiration In physiological bot., a process consisting in the absorption by plants of oxygen from the air, the oxidation of assimilated products, and the release of carbon dioxid and watery vapor. It is the opposite of assimilation in which carbon dioxid (carbonic acid) is absorbed and oxygen given off—contrasted also as being the waste process in the plant economy, a part of the potential energy of a higher compound being converted into kinetic energy, supporting the activities of the plant, the resulting compound of lower potential being excreted. Respiration takes place in all active cells both by day and by night; assimilation only by daylight (then overshadowing the other process) and in cells containing chlorophyl.
    • n respiration The respiratory murmur.
    • n respiration A breathing-spell; an interval.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Respiration the function of breathing: relief from toil
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. respiratio,: cf. F. respiration,. See Respire
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. respirārere-, sig. repetition, spirāre, -ātum, to breathe.

Usage

In literature:

Her quick respirations had become audible.
"The Redemption of David Corson" by Charles Frederic Goss
This slow torture was too much for the attorney's fortitude; and, as his respiration grew painful, he called to his executioner to stop.
"Hatchie, the Guardian Slave; or, The Heiress of Bellevue" by Warren T. Ashton
One wit suggested wadded coats and respirators.
"Acton's Feud" by Frederick Swainson
The other cells nourish and transport them and carry on the work of excretion and respiration.
"The Whence and the Whither of Man" by John Mason Tyler
Madame was breathing in the deep respiration of heavy sleep.
"Uncle Silas" by J. S. LeFanu
Breathing deeply, he drew in the fragrance of her memory, and the bitterness of things was dulled with every quiet respiration.
"The Younger Set" by Robert W. Chambers
Might as well put a respirator on a South Sea Islander.
"Red Pottage" by Mary Cholmondeley
His broad chest expanded inches with each respiration.
"The Wings of the Morning" by Louis Tracy
Respiration had ceased, but no time was lost in commencing artificial respiration.
"Scientific American Supplement No. 819" by Various
They are directly beneath one another, and respiration is somewhat difficult in the lower holes.
"The Aldine, Vol. 5, No. 1., January, 1872" by Various
Do not allow your nerves to be over-strained by the asthmatic respiration.
"David Lockwin--The People's Idol" by John McGovern
But I did not trouble to put my box-respirator on; the gas was not so bad as that.
"At Ypres with Best-Dunkley" by Thomas Hope Floyd
Squire Eben moved through it as through a scented flood in which respiration was possible.
"Jerome, A Poor Man" by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
Artificial respiration may be useful in tiding a patient over the critical period of shock, especially at the end of a severe operation.
"Manual of Surgery" by Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles
Seventh day, respiration irregular (217).
"The Mind of the Child, Part II" by W. Preyer
It has been already pointed out that respiration is in all animals, in the end, the same process.
"Voice Production in Singing and Speaking" by Wesley Mills
You can see their "box respirators," or gas-masks, worn at the "alert" position.
"Winning a Cause" by John Gilbert Thompson and Inez Bigwood
In childhood, and until about the age of puberty, respiration in the boy and the girl is exactly the same.
"Plain Facts for Old and Young" by John Harvey Kellogg
The respiration of the baby often gives us no small amount of real concern at the first.
"The Mother and Her Child" by William S. Sadler
He found a storage bin filled with oxygen respirators.
"The Status Civilization" by Robert Sheckley
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In poetry:

XI. Such was the time, and such the place,
The bard respir'd his song of woe,
To those, who had of Erin's race
Surviv'd their freedom's vital blow.
"The Irish Harp" by Sydney Owenson
He hears them breathing, softly, fearfully,
Honey-sweet ruminations, slow respired:
Then a sharp hiss breaks time and melody--
Spittle indrawn, old kisses new-desired.
"The Louse-Hunters" by Aldous Huxley
A few small spires, to Gothic fancy fair,
Amid the shades emerging, struck the view;
'Twas here his youth respired its earliest air;
'Twas here his age breathed out its last adieu.
"Elegy XV. In Memory of a Private Family in Worcestershire" by William Shenstone
II. Then take it—but oh! still be present the while,
When another that lay shall respire;
For at least I have felt 'tis the spell of thy smile
That alone can the songstress inspire.
"Fragment IX." by Sydney Owenson
Yet, haply lest I check the mounting fire,
O friends, that in your revelry appears!
With you I'll breathe the air which ye respire,
And, smiling, hide my melancholy lyre
When it is wet with tears.
"Regret" by Victor Marie Hugo
IX. Till warm'd by a kindness endearing , as dear ,
A wild, artless, song was respir'd for thee;
'Twas a national lay! and oh! when shall the tear
Which was shed o'er that song, be forgotten by me.
"To Mrs. Lefanue" by Sydney Owenson

In news:

Etta James' manager says the terminally ill blues singer is breathing on her own after being taken off a respirator .
The 9000 reusable full-face respirator from Moldex-Metric, Culver City, Calif, has won the OH&S 2011 New Product of the Year Award.
Foss Manufacturing's Fosshield Antimicrobial Technology is now available to the commercial market and has been selected by Nexera Medical as the antibacterial technology in its new SpectraShield 9500 Surgical N95 Respirator Mask.
The respirator slowly pumps air in and out of the footb...
The survey collected data on the types of respiratory protection used by workers at an establishment, types of respirator fit tests performed, and presence of substances that prompted the decision to use respiratory protection.
NIOSH issued the first two certificates of approval for air-purifying escape respirators (APER) with chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) protection.
Respirators With Air Conditioning.
But the doctors argued against treating Mrs Wanglie because they said that her condition was hopeless and that respirators were not meant for prolonging life in such cases.
Emergency respirator now protects against CO. An emergency device such as an escape mask has a single, critical function.
Chi-Keng Wu, Pau-Choo (Julia) Chung, Chi-Jen Wang, "Representative Segment -based Emotion Analysis and Classification with Automatic Respiration Signal Segmentation ," IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, vol 99, no.
New federal rules tightening workplace exposure limits and other requirements involving respirable crystalline silica are expected soon, likely bringing major changes for the coatings industry.
We need to replace water lost through respiration, sweat and elimination.
At Ga port, river respirators to help fish breathe .
North® CF1000 Continuous Flow Supplied Air Respirator (CF-SAR).
Chi-Keng Wu, Pau-Choo (Julia) Chung, Chi-Jen Wang, "Representative Segment-based Emotion Analysis and Classification with Automatic Respiration Signal Segmentation," IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, vol 99, no.
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In science:

Gomez, Airway pressure alters wavelet fractal dynamics and short-range dependence of respiratory variability, Respir.
Generalized Whittle-Mat$\acute{\text{E}}$rn random field as a model of correlated fluctuations
Biology by St. Reece and D.G. Noguera (2009)). For instance, electron tunneling has been observed in cellular respiration (Gray and Winkler, 2003) and electron transport along DNA has been shown by Winkler et al. (2005).
Randomness and Multi-level Interactions in Biology
ATP is produced during cellular respiration and photosynthesis.
Students' Interdisciplinary Reasoning about "High-Energy Bonds" and ATP
For example, phonation only comes into perspective when connected with respiration; the articulators affect resonance (e.g., chest voice or head voice); the resonators affect the vocal folds; the vocal folds affect breath control; and so forth.
Music in Terms of Science
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