reprobate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj reprobate deviating from what is considered moral or right or proper or good "depraved criminals","a perverted sense of loyalty","the reprobate conduct of a gambling aristocrat"
    • v reprobate reject (documents) as invalid
    • v reprobate express strong disapproval of "We condemn the racism in South Africa","These ideas were reprobated"
    • v reprobate abandon to eternal damnation "God reprobated the unrepenting sinner"
    • n reprobate a person without moral scruples
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Reprobate Abandoned to punishment; hence, morally abandoned and lost; given up to vice; depraved. "And strength, and art, are easily outdone
      By spirits reprobate ."
    • Reprobate Not enduring proof or trial; not of standard purity or fineness; disallowed; rejected. "Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them."
    • Reprobate Of or pertaining to one who is given up to wickedness; as, reprobate conduct. "Reprobate desire."
    • n Reprobate One morally abandoned and lost. "I acknowledge myself for a reprobate , a villain, a traitor to the king."
    • Reprobate To abandon to punishment without hope of pardon.
    • Reprobate To disapprove with detestation or marks of extreme dislike; to condemn as unworthy; to disallow; to reject. "Such an answer as this is reprobated and disallowed of in law; I do not believe it, unless the deed appears.""Every scheme, every person, recommended by one of them, was reprobated by the other."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • reprobate To disapprove vehemently; contemn strongly; condemn; reject.
    • reprobate To abandon to vice or punishment, or to hopeless ruin or destruction. See reprobation, 3.
    • reprobate Synonyms To reprehend, censure. See reprobate, a.
    • reprobate Disallowed; disapproved; rejected; not enduring proof or trial.
    • reprobate Abandoned in sin; morally abandoned; depraved; characteristic of a reprobate.
    • reprobate Expressing disapproval or censure; condemnatory.
    • reprobate Synonyms profligate, etc. (see abandoned), vitiated, corrupt, hardened, wicked, base, vile, cast away, graceless, shameless.
    • n reprobate One who is very profligate or abandoned; a person given over to sin; one lost to virtue and religion; a wicked, depraved wretch.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Reprobate rep′rō-bāt condemned: base: given over to sin: depraved: vile: :
    • n Reprobate an abandoned or profligate person: one lost to shame
    • v.t Reprobate to disapprove: to censure: to disown
    • adj Reprobate rep′rō-bāt (B.) that will not stand proof or trial
    • adj Reprobate rep′rō-bāt (Sterne) condemnatory
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. reprobatus, p. p. of reprobare, to disapprove, condemn. See Reprieve Reprove
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. reprobatus, pa.p. of reprobāre, to reprove.

Usage

In literature:

Now, that old reprobate of a pheasant of ours was a pretty confirmed runner, anyway.
"The Way of the Wild" by F. St. Mars
Meanwhile the reprobate need not fear hell in the next world, but the elect are sure to find it here.
"Winds Of Doctrine" by George Santayana
It was impossible to convey a stronger effect of moral reprobation.
"The Helpmate" by May Sinclair
The undersigned, citizens of Rhode Island, have long regarded the lottery system with unqualified reprobation.
"Secret Band of Brothers" by Jonathan Harrington Green
Brian Fairfax, who loved this brilliant reprobate, has left the only authentic account on record of his last hours.
"The Wits and Beaux of Society" by Grace Wharton and Philip Wharton
He assumed the language of the lowest reprobates.
"History of the Girondists, Volume I" by Alphonse de Lamartine
In this manner the authority of the British legislature was at that time treated with every mark of reprobation and contempt.
"The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VIII. (of 12)" by Edmund Burke
We have therefore in our charge strongly reprobated Sir Elijah Impey's going to take such affidavits.
"The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. XII. (of XII.)" by Edmund Burke
Arianism seemed crushed for ever by the universal reprobation of the Christian world.
"The Arian Controversy" by H. M. Gwatkin
Failure to meet these obligations brands one a reprobate.
"Explanation of Catholic Morals" by John H. Stapleton
In denying reprobation, I deny revelation, he says, and also the Atonement, upon which salvation depends.
"John Ward, Preacher" by Margaret Deland
A funny reprobate is that old person.
"The Chequers" by James Runciman
You go into neither extreme, whether of implicit faith or of violent reprobation.
"Apologia pro Vita Sua" by John Henry Newman
If there were those who reprobated the action they were silent.
"The Colonel's Dream" by Charles W. Chesnutt
He fancied that this trembling was the sign set on the worst reprobates, the sign which God had put on Cain.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4" by Various
Look how all the rogues and reprobates march like one man!
"Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2" by John Wilson
Seared in their consciences, they were truly given over to a reprobate mind.
"Salt Water" by W. H. G. Kingston
You have been sold to one of those reprobates, whose name I think they mentioned was Baetens.
"The Phantom Ship" by Frederick Marryat
Medical works were called for by one party, and reprobated by another.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3)" by Isaac D'Israeli
I suspect him for one naturally reprobate.
"The Confidence-Man" by Herman Melville
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In poetry:

The Church of God does not a Turk admit,
Nor any one, that of true faith is void,
To her communion : Do not thou permit
A reprobate to be by thee employ'd.
"Advice To Ev'ry Master Of A Family, To Govern His House In A Religious Manner" by Rees Prichard
Though Magdalene was once a reprobate,
And sinn'd, e'er she believ'd at any rate,
Yet afterwards a virtuous life she led,
And was declared a saint, when she was dead.
"Advice To Believe In Christ, And An Exhibition Or Display Of The Wonderful Change That Is Wrought In" by Rees Prichard
So can he make of thee, thou sinful soul!
Although by nature reprobate and foul,
A perfect saint — if thou in him wilt place
Thy trust — thereby to get his aid and grace.
"Advice To Believe In Christ, And An Exhibition Or Display Of The Wonderful Change That Is Wrought In" by Rees Prichard
'Tis even so: the sovereign Lord of souls
Stores in the dungeon of His boundless realm
Each bolt that o'er the sinner vainly rolls,
With gathered wrath the reprobate to whelm.
"Second Sunday In Lent" by John Keble
No souls can be sav'd in the days, that now last,
In those yet to come, or in those that are past,
But they that are kept by Christ Jesus alone;
The reprobate crew shall be damn'd ev'ry one.
"Another Piece Of Advice To Sinners To Come To Christ" by Rees Prichard
Think, kind Jesu, my salvation
Caused Thy wondrous Incarnation,
Leave me not to reprobation.
Faint and weary Thou hast sought me,
On the Cross of anguish bought me;
Shall such grace be vainly brought me?
"Dum Agonizatur Anima, Orent Assistentes" by Digby Mackworth Dolben

In news:

Terry Zwigoff's Bad Santa is a one-joke movie, albeit a joke that professional reprobates like W.C.
And, yes, a mad, desperate world choked with reproduction and reprobation could hardly be expected to resist such a high-concept commercial incantation.
The reprobates from Scumbag College are up against Footlights College on a TV quiz show.
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