rectification

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n rectification determination of the length of a curve; finding a straight line equal in length to a given curve
    • n rectification the act of offering an improvement to replace a mistake; setting right
    • n rectification the conversion of alternating current to direct current
    • n rectification (chemistry) the process of refinement or purification of a substance by distillation
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Rectification The act or operation of rectifying; as, the rectification of an error; the rectification of spirits. "After the rectification of his views, he was incapable of compromise with profounder shapes of error."
    • Rectification (Geom) The determination of a straight line whose length is equal a portion of a curve.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n rectification The act or operation of rectifying. The act of correcting, amending, or setting right that which is wrong or erroneous: as, the rectification of errors, mistakes, or abuses.
    • n rectification The process of refining a substance by repeated or fractional distillation: it is in this way freed from other substances which are either more or less volatile than itself, or from non-volatile matters: as, tho rectification of spirits. The concentration of sulphuric acid in platinum or glass vessels is sometimes (improperly) called rectification.
    • n rectification In geometry, the determination of a straight line whose length is equal to a given portion of a curve; the finding a formula for the length of the arc of a given curve.
    • n rectification In its specific use in relation to the increase of strength of alcoholic liquors by distillation, rectification signifies repeated fractional evaporation of the mixed liquid, dephlegmation repeated fractional condensation of the mixed vapor. Both words are simultaneously applied in the improved forms of still.
    • n rectification In astral., the ascertainment of the true time of birth by comparison of the directions deduced from the estimated time with the dates of events in the native's life.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Rectification the act of rectifying or setting right: the process of refining any substance by repeated distillation: rectification of a globe, its adjustment preparatory to the solution of a proposed problem
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Quotations

  • Ambrose Bierce
    Ambrose%20Bierce
    “Divorce. A resumption of diplomatic relations and rectification of boundaries.”
  • Gaston Bachelard
    Gaston%20Bachelard
    “Ideas are invented only as correctives to the past. Through repeated rectification of this kind one may hope to disengage an idea that is valid.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. F. rectification,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. rectus, straight, facĕre, to make.

Usage

In literature:

Whatever the merit of the conception, there had to be a score of rectifications when the measure came into operation.
"Lloyd George" by Frank Dilnot
If you are only well beforehand with your falsehood all will go upon velvet; nobody ever listens to a rectification.
"Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida" by Ouida
It is frequently said that Godkin rarely, if ever, made a retraction or a rectification of personal charges shown to be incorrect.
"Historical Essays" by James Ford Rhodes
Redistribution and rectification of the error were in order.
"The Adventures of Bobby Orde" by Stewart Edward White
There is the rectification of our own hearts, the revealing of Divine things within us, the transforming of our characters.
"Standards of Life and Service" by T. H. Howard
Kruzenstern's was therefore an important rectification.
"Celebrated Travels and Travellers" by Jules Verne
I asked him how he had managed the rectification of the matter; did he take the upper table off?
"The Repairing & Restoration of Violins" by Horace Petherick
But no nation is completely satisfied; each wants a "rectification" here and a "compensation" there.
"American World Policies" by Walter E. Weyl
It needed a rectification which should again rescue the freedom of the spirit.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 16" by Various
Fever is itself a succor; it is a rectification when it does not kill.
"A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 5 (of 10)" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
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In news:

The difference between cohobation and rectification columns.
Is there any difference between a cohobation column and a rectification column -- or are they used as synonyms.
A Hybrid 18-Pulse Rectification Scheme for Diode Front End Variable Frequency Drives.
As a recent new resident of the city the pension funding issues for public employees seems to be an issue needing immediate rectification.
"The generation that made the (Cuban) revolution has had the historic privilege, few times seen, of being able to direct the rectification of errors they themselves committed," he told a Communist Party conference in January.
For absorption, desorption, rectification and direct heat transfer.
The Titan 's dual-mono AC power-supply circuitry is housed in one chassis, its dual-mono amplifiers and associated rectification and power storage in another.
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In science:

By fo llowing a cycle o f testing and rectification we can iden tify issues and resolve them.
Mathematical Principles in Software Quality Engineering
Within a common FDT framework for asymmetric movements, these changes would be similarly facilitated by thermal excitations from bath, with rectification by either the gentle H-field gradient or the fields of its local ‘template’-partners (see Figure 3 legend).
Field-control, phase-transitions, and life's emergence
These changes would be similarly facilitated by thermal excitations from bath, with rectification by either the gentle H-field gradient or local template-partner H-fields (see text).
Field-control, phase-transitions, and life's emergence
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