ratiocinate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v ratiocinate reason methodologically and logically
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • v. i Ratiocinate răsh`ĭ*ŏs"ĭ*nāt To reason, esp. deductively; to offer reason or argument.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • ratiocinate To reason; from two judgments to infer a third. The word usually implies an elaborate deductive operation.
    • ratiocinate Reasoned about.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Ratiocinate rash-i-os′i-nāt to reason
    • pr.p Ratiocinate ratioc′inating; pa.p. ratioc′inated
    • ***

Quotations

  • James Dye
    James Dye
    “I don't like fuckfaces or arrogant ratiocinations. What I do like is dual-meaning words in poems.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. ratiocinatus, p. p. of ratiocinari, fr. ratio, reason. See Ratio

Usage

In literature:

We do not ratiocinate, we run.
"Woman and Womanhood" by C. W. Saleeby
The presence of the little cur-dog had destroyed the complacence of his boasted ratiocination.
"The Crucial Moment" by Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)
Its two constituent parts are ratiocination and description.
"The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes" by Samuel Johnson
It would be absurd to say that the ratiocinative, literal mind is higher than the ideal.
"Commentary Upon the Maya-Tzental Perez Codex" by William E. Gates
Not that it was taken consciously by the poet or maker after much ratiocination; he has to take it, if he sees the universe as it is.
"Homer's Odyssey" by Denton J. Snider
He'd run in debt by disputation, And pay with ratiocination.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7" by Various
It consists of processes of Induction, Ratiocination, and Verification.
"Analysis of Mr. Mill's System of Logic" by William Stebbing
The German, however, is articulate and ratiocinating where we are more purely instinctive.
"Artists Past and Present" by Elisabeth Luther Cary
It goes in for ratiocinative reasoning.
"The Bartlett Mystery" by Louis Tracy
Thou shalt comprehend by intuition what will never be given thee by ratiocination.
"Shadows of Flames" by Amelie Rives
The presence of the little cur-dog had destroyed the complacence of his boasted ratiocination.
"The Raid of The Guerilla and Other Stories" by Charles Egbert Craddock
A process of ratiocination never troubled the brain of any of the five.
"The Young Yagers" by Mayne Reid
This mental ratiocination had occupied her during the days of her seclusion.
"The White Squaw" by Mayne Reid
That is the utmost his ratiocination can do; he can perceive that Boston, Washington, Chicago, are not Paris.
"From the Oak to the Olive" by Julia Ward Howe
Such is Christian ratiocination.
"The World's Sixteen Crucified Saviors" by Kersey Graves
He is evidently most at home in the regions of ratiocination.
"The Genius of Scotland" by Robert Turnbull
Christianity is not propagated by ratiocination, it is the result of feelings and affections on the will and understanding.
"The American Indians" by Henry R. Schoolcraft
This shock, however, disturbed his ratiocination, and he floundered on rather feebly in his plea.
"Mark Gildersleeve" by John S. Sauzade
Christianity is not propagated by ratiocination, it is the result of feelings and affections on the will and understanding.
"Western Scenes and Reminiscences" by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Christianity is not propagated by ratiocination, it is the result of feelings and affections on the will and understanding.
"The Indian in his Wigwam" by Henry R. Schoolcraft
***

In poetry:

SIR MACKLIN was a priest severe
In conduct and in conversation,
It did a sinner good to hear
Him deal in ratiocination.
"Sir Macklin" by William Schwenck Gilbert