rancor

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n rancor a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Rancor răṉ"kẽr The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred. "To stint rancour and dissencioun.""It would not be easy to conceive the passion, rancor , and malice of their tongues and hearts.""Rancor will out; proud prelate, in thy face
      I see thy fury."
      "Rancor is that degree of malice which preys upon the possessor."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n rancor Sourness; bitterness.
    • n rancor Rankling malice or spitefulness; bitter animosity; in general, a soured or cankered disposition, inciting to vindictive action or speech; a nourished hatred or grudge.
    • n rancor Synonyms Asperity, Harshness, etc. (see acrimony), Illwill, Enmity, etc. (see animosity), gall, spleen, spite, spitefulness, rankling, hate, hatred, malevolence, bad blood.
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Quotations

  • Jose Ortega Y Gasset
    Jose%20Ortega%20Y%20Gasset
    “Rancor is an outpouring of a feeling of inferiority.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. rancour, OF. rancor, rancur, F. rancune, fr. L. rancor, rancidity, rankness; tropically, an old grudge, rancor, fr. rancere, to be rank or rancid

Usage

In literature:

The fellow looked rancorous.
"The Fighting Edge" by William MacLeod Raine
As a specimen of unbridled rancor Hodge deserves a prize.
"A Pessimist" by Robert Timsol
For behind Dakota's soft voice and gentle, over-polite manner, he felt the deep rancor for whose existence he alone was responsible.
"The Trail to Yesterday" by Charles Alden Seltzer
The old antagonism soon reappeared, and daily grew more rancorous.
"Louis XIV., Makers of History Series" by John S. C. Abbott
Why should she bury her life in this cruel, rancorous atmosphere?
"The Wall Between" by Sara Ware Bassett
It dulled the edge of rancor brutally, as a rock dulls a razor.
"Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 5, June 1905" by Various
Ferguson seized on the opportunity thus given to voice the rancor that was in his heart.
"Making People Happy" by Thompson Buchanan
But the mere name of Constance had acted as a spur to her rancor.
"Marjorie Dean" by Pauline Lester
An emotion of most rancorous bitterness was burning in the breast of the young backwoodsman.
"The Wild Huntress" by Mayne Reid
He washed the blood from his face, and tried to wash away the rancor which his master's conduct had kindled in his soul.
"Watch and Wait" by Oliver Optic
May not any man be subjected to be treated as a felon, upon the instigation of private malice, or party animosity, or religious rancor?
"The Trial of Reuben Crandall, M.D. Charged with Publishing and Circulating Seditious and Incendiary Papers, &c. in the District of Columbia, with the Intent of Exciting Servile Insurrection." by Unknown
Without rancor I reach mine toward thee.
"The Essays of "George Eliot" Complete" by George Eliot
What rancor of Boriskoff's would harm the lad he desired to be the husband of his daughter.
"Aladdin of London" by Sir Max Pemberton
Certainly, it would be absurd to cherish any rancor.
"Heart of the Blue Ridge" by Waldron Baily
Of Circe, who so rancorously had us'd The power of plants.
"The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II" by Ovid
To be sure, it takes passing shots at old enemies like Swift, but never with rancor.
"A Discourse Concerning Ridicule and Irony in Writing (1729)" by Anthony Collins
In all these matters he had to encounter at every step the rancorous opposition of his political adversaries.
"The Day of Sir John Macdonald" by Joseph Pope
And a very silly kind of life, too, he told himself without rancor.
"Occasion for Disaster" by Gordon Randall Garrett
There Colden stood, with a rancorously jubilant smile, to receive him.
"The Continental Dragoon" by Robert Neilson Stephens
Speeches full of rancor and falsehood were made to exasperate the populace.
"Maria Antoinette" by John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott
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In poetry:

Torrents of stone labors of foam
Where eyes float without rancor
Just eyes without hope
That know you
And that you should have put out
Rather than ignore
"Head Against The Walls" by Paul Eluard
Virtue is with the tranquil and the braves;
The fire interior burneth well and high;
Triumphant over rancor and the grave,
Toward Bethlehem-the caravan goes by!
"Portico" by Ruben Dario
Why vehemently
Astride the threshold do I wait, marking
The ice softly pendent on his broken temple?
Upon the silence I cast the mesh of rancor
By which the gentler convergences of the flesh
Scatter untokened, mercilessly estopped.
"A Pauper" by Allen Tate

In news:

Supreme Court debate focuses on rancor among current justices.
Can a new 'national civility institute' calm political rancor .
Firms' lobbying push comes amid rancor on TSA use of airport full-body scanners.
Public servants feel sting of budget rancor .
Wharton takes Memphis mayor's oath, vows to end ' rancor and divisiveness'.
McCain vows to "end constant partison rancor ".
" Rancor is poison to the soul".
Hussein's Day at Trial: More Rancor and a Fight.
Redistricting plan OK'd amid rancor .
Kennedy and Romney Meet, And the Rancor Flows Freely.
In Rancorous Times, Can Wikipedia Show Us How to All Get Along.
Supreme Court Justice Defeated in Rancorous Contest.
The rant blog is back and you didn't disappoint with your level of rancor.
Congress's approval rating is barely at 10 percent, and the venerable institution is filled with such rancor that moderates such as Sen Olympia Snowe (R) of Maine are fleeing the place.
The partisan rancor began early in Christie 's term, when he broke precedent by not reappointing Gloucester County's John Wallace, leaving the court without an African American judge.
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