raggedness

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n raggedness shabbiness by virtue of being in rags
    • n raggedness a texture of a surface or edge that is not smooth but is irregular and uneven
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n raggedness The state or character of being ragged, in any sense.
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Usage

In literature:

Of all the beggar-men that I had seen or fancied, he was the chief for raggedness.
"Treasure Island" by Robert Louis Stevenson
I soon, however, saw too much; for all was raggedness, dirt, and disorder.
"Visit to Iceland and the Scandinavian North" by Ida Pfeiffer
Straight away, without heeding the raggedness of the orifice, she settles down in the cell which I have opened for her.
"The Mason-bees" by J. Henri Fabre
It was a little Bible, worn and frayed at the edges, pathetic in its raggedness.
"God's Country--And the Woman" by James Oliver Curwood
It was a pity only to look upon the raggedness of his soldiers.
"History of the United Netherlands, 1584-86, Vol. I. (of IV) Complete" by John Lothrop Motley
This extreme raggedness of outline is easily explained.
"At Last" by Charles Kingsley
I was getting raggeder and raggeder every day.
"Vandemark's Folly" by Herbert Quick
I was, for the moment, ashamed to show myself to "the perfesser," because of the raggedness that I had fallen into.
"Tramping on Life" by Harry Kemp
A raggedness, a poverty, a shiftlessness, characterized external Washington.
"Children of the Market Place" by Edgar Lee Masters
Sometimes Bunny and I are raggeder than you.
"Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Big Woods" by Laura Lee Hope
Down the yellow river swept the two uninjured rafts and the one that carried a fringe of raggedness.
"A Pagan of the Hills" by Charles Neville Buck
The very raggedness of the thing before him lured him and drew him on.
"The White Desert" by Courtney Ryley Cooper
Some magic had lulled him, too, into a quietened mood from which had been smoothed the saw-edged raggedness of despair.
"The Tyranny of Weakness" by Charles Neville Buck
Of all the beggar-men that I had seen or fancied, he was the chief for raggedness.
"Treasure Island" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Of all the beggar-men that I had seen or fancied, he was the chief for raggedness.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson" by Robert Louis Stevenson
More than that, the raggeder I grow the better I feel.
"Stranded in Arcady" by Francis Lynde
The scudding raggedness of the clouds had been swept into wider tatters now and the moon was steadier though still not brightly clear.
"When 'Bear Cat' Went Dry" by Charles Neville Buck
Betty, who had been admiring the supreme raggedness of the donkey, asked its name.
"The Charm of Ireland" by Burton Egbert Stevenson
There was no raggedness in attack or cessation.
"Franz Liszt" by James Huneker
His clothes are of shoddy, with a tendency to raggedness.
"The Socialist" by Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull
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In science:

The raggedness of the boundaries of the shaded regions reflects the finite sample size.
Dark Matter Candidates in Supersymmetric Models
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