quince

Definitions

  • Immature stages of the quince curculio
    Immature stages of the quince curculio
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n quince aromatic acid-tasting pear-shaped fruit used in preserves
    • n quince small Asian tree with pinkish flowers and pear-shaped fruit; widely cultivated
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Quince (Bot) a quince tree or shrub.
    • Quince The fruit of a shrub (Cydonia vulgaris) belonging to the same tribe as the apple. It somewhat resembles an apple, but differs in having many seeds in each carpel. It has hard flesh of high flavor, but very acid, and is largely used for marmalade, jelly, and preserves.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n quince The fruit of the tree Pyrus Cydonia. (See def. 2.) It is pear-shaped, or in one variety apple-shaped, large, sometimes weighing a pound, of a golden-yellow color when ripe, and very fragrant. The quince was known to the ancients, and it has been argued that the golden apples of the Hesperides were quinces. While raw it is hard and austere, but it becomes edible by boiling or baking, and is largely used for jelly, preserves, and marmalade (see etymology of marmalade), and for flavoring sauces of other fruits. The seeds of the common quince are used in medicine and the arts, on account of their highly mucilaginous coat. In decoction they afford a demulcent application, and they are sometimes used in eye-lotions. Their mucilage is employed in making bandoline and in marbling books. See bandoline.
    • n quince The fruit-tree Pyrus Cydonia, sometimes classed as Cydonia vulgaris, the latter genus being based (insufficiently) on the many-seeded cells of the fruit. The quince is a small hardy tree, usually dwarfed, but sometimes reaching 15 or 20 feet in height, having crooked spreading branches which produce the flowers singly at their ends. Besides bearing fruit, the quince often serves as a stock for dwarfing the pear. The local origin of the quince is not clearly known, but it occurs spontaneously from northwestern India westward through the Mediterranean basin. The name quince applies also to any of the plants formerly referred to Cydonia. See the phrases below.
    • n quince Scrofula.
    • n quince Same as quinze.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Quince kwins the golden, globose or pear-shaped, fragrant fruit of a large shrub or small tree (Pyrus Cydonia) of the rose family, too austere to be eaten raw, but excellent for jellies, marmalade, and flavouring other fruits.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Prob. a pl. from OE. quyne, coin, OF. coin, cooin, F. coing, from L. Cydonius, a quince tree, as adj., Cydonian, Gr. Cydonian, a quince, fr. Cydonia, a city in Crete, the Cydonians. Cf. Quiddany
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Pl. of quine—O. Fr. coin (Fr. coing)—L. cydonium—Gr. Cydōnia, in Crete.

Usage

In literature:

I went out with him, and we found the Countess sitting under one of the little quince-trees in front of the house.
"Four Meetings" by Henry James
Cheries, Peares, Apricocks, Quinces, and Plummes would be gathered and grafted sooner.
"A New Orchard And Garden" by William Lawson
When quinces have been boiled for marmalade, take the first liquor and pass it through a jelly bag.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
Quinces, to preserve ib.
"The Lady's Own Cookery Book, and New Dinner-Table Directory;" by Charlotte Campbell Bury
Peaches, pears or quinces are made the same way.
"Desserts and Salads" by Gesine Lemcke
Large and high-flavored, the fruit is solid in texture like the American quince.
"Due South or Cuba Past and Present" by Maturin M. Ballou
Their complexion is yellowish brown, like a boiled quince, and the beard is slight.
"The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume 40 of 55" by Francisco Colin
Quinces should be rubbed with a coarse towel before they are washed.
"Canned Fruit, Preserves, and Jellies: Household Methods of Preparation" by Maria Parloa
My il-o-quince had the marm.
"The Humors of Falconbridge" by Jonathan F. Kelley
The quinces there, before the bride.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Grows well on quince or pear, but perhaps does best on quince.
"Soil Culture" by J. H. Walden
QUINCE, origin of, ii.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3)" by Isaac Disraeli
Select your trees yourself, and go only to first rate nurserymen for pears if you want varieties on the Quince stock.
"The Book of Pears and Plums" by Edward Bartrum
Since that time, our plantation of quince bushes has grown finely.
"Solaris Farm" by Milan C. Edson
Cut the apples into quarters, but slice the quinces much thinner as they are more difficult to cook.
"The Apple" by Various
Now a particularly fine quince growing just above reach seemed to attract the eye of the Kaffir.
"A Veldt Official" by Bertram Mitford
At the back of the house was a large fruit garden, fenced in by hedges of quince and pomegranate.
"Harley Greenoak's Charge" by Bertram Mitford
Pare six large quinces and grate them.
"Civic League Cook Book" by Anonymous
All the same the fruit is quince.
"Geography and Plays" by Gertrude Stein
It was a quince jam, and made her think of home, she said.
"Stories That End Well" by Octave Thanet
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In poetry:

Q was a Quince that hung
Upon a garden tree;
Papa he brought it with him home,
And ate it with his tea.
"Nonsense Alphabet" by Edward Lear
Though leaves have fallen long since,
The wagtails flirt and flit,
Glad in the morning sun;
While, on the knotted quince,
The dewdrops, pearled on it,
Bead to a little run. . . .
"The First Thrush" by Dame Mary Gilmore DBE
This morning, when my window's chintz
I drew, how gray the day was!—Since
I saw him, yea, all days are gray!—
I gazed out on my dripping quince,
Defruited, gnarled; then turned away
"Uncertainty" by Madison Julius Cawein
Serene with sleep, light visions weigh her eyes:
And underneath her window blooms a quince.
The night is a sultana who doth rise
In slippered caution, to admit a prince,
Love, who her eunuchs and her lord defies.
"O Maytime Woods!" by Madison Julius Cawein
Are these her dreams? or is it that the breeze
Pelts me with petals of the quince, and lifts
The Balm-o'-Gilead buds? and seems to squeeze
Aroma on aroma through sweet rifts
Of Eden, dripping through the rainy trees.
"O Maytime Woods!" by Madison Julius Cawein
She leans with her long slender arms
To pull down morning upon her
Fragrance of quince, white light and falling cloud.
The day shall have lacked due honor
Until I shall have rightly praised
Her standing thus with slight arms upraised.
"Fiametta" by John Peale Bishop

In news:

Content tagged with " quince ".
Quince paste (membrillo) can be found in the gourmet cheese section of many grocery stores.
Eat & Tell: What Are Quince .
You might take a cue from this, and obtain a division from one of the neighborhood quinces you see blooming now – but please get permission.
Quince Orchard contains Westminster.
Quince evaluated for hardiness.
Gaithersburg'S Quince Orchard High School.
Every year since it opened in 2003, Michael and Lindsay Tusk's Quince has seemed to grow a little more polished.
Quince art fair just in time for holiday shoppers.
Quince in St Paul (850 Grand Ave. Quincegifts.com) is taking holiday shopping outside.
'The Biggest Loser': Kournikova, Quince are trainers first, stars second.
"The Biggest Loser" stars Dolvett Quince , Alison Sweeney, Bob Harper and Anna Kournikova.
The Memory-Invoking Power of Quince .
The citrusy quince was once more popular than the apple.
True quinces are edible right off the tree, although they're somewhat dry and tart.
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