quartz oscillator

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n quartz oscillator an oscillator that produces electrical oscillations at a frequency determined by the physical characteristics of a piezoelectric quartz crystal
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Usage

In literature:

They can tell the quartz oscillator is stopped.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science, August 1930" by Various
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In news:

Measuring only 2.50 x 2.00 x 0.89 mm, the CXOQ crystal oscillator takes advantage of the latest advancements in quartz micro-machining and hermetically sealed ceramic package technologies.
Hi-Rel/COTS oscillators are quartz oscillators that work in tough, environmentally challenging applications typically associated with mission-critical military uses.
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In science:

The maximum on the frequency dependence of the dissipation allows one to extract the correlation radius (characteristic size) of the surface inhomogeneities directly from, for example, experiments with torsional quartz oscillators.
Surface Roughness and Effective Stick-Slip Motion
In principle, it is possible to slightly modify our problem by considering a torsional quartz crystal oscillator with density ρs , thickness d.
Surface Roughness and Effective Stick-Slip Motion
The position of the maximum on the frequency dependence of the dissipation allows one to extract the correlation radius (characteristic size) of the surface inhomogeneities directly from, for example, experiments with torsional quartz oscillators.
Surface Roughness and Effective Stick-Slip Motion
In the middle of the 20th century, the invention of the quartz oscillator and the first atomic clocks opened a new era for time keeping, with inacuracies improving from 10 microseconds per day in 1967 to 100 picoseconds per day for the primary cesium atomic clocks using laser cooled atomic fountains.
Testing General Relativity with Atomic Clocks
Because the CD is not measured for the α-quartz and therefore nor the ORD in the absorption region Chandrasekhar has assumed the oscillators as undamped.
Note on the Chandrasekhar Model of the Optical Activity of Crystals
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