pumice

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v pumice rub with pumice, in order to clean or to smoothen
    • n pumice a light glass formed on the surface of some lavas; used as an abrasive
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The only rock that floats in water is pumice.
    • n Pumice (Min) A very light porous volcanic scoria, usually of a gray color, the pores of which are capillary and parallel, giving it a fibrous structure. It is supposed to be produced by the disengagement of watery vapor without liquid or plastic lava. It is much used, esp. in the form of powder, for smoothing and polishing. Called also pumice stone.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pumice Lava having a loose, spongy or cellular structure; lava from which gas or steam has escaped in large quantities while it was becoming consolidated. Pumice is usually a form of obsidian, and contains from 60 to 75 per cent. of silica. It is often so porous as to float on water for a considerable time after being ejected from a volcano. After its pores become tilled with water it sinks to the bottom, its specific gravity being nearly two and a half times that of water.
    • pumice To polish, rub, or otherwise treat with pumicestone; especially, in silver-plating, to clean with pumice and water, as the surface of an article to be plated.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pumice pum′is or pū′mis a hard, light, spongy substance, formed of lava, from which gas or steam has escaped while hardening
    • v.t Pumice to polish or rub with pumice-stone—also Pū′micāte
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. pumex, pumicis, prob. akin to spuma, foam: cf. AS. pumic-,stān. Cf. Pounce a powder, Spume

Usage

In literature:

Pumice Stone, used in finishing skins, 276.
"Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making" by William Hamilton Gibson
These pieces of pumice stone are filled into a retort or chamber and the hot gases passed through them.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 717, September 28, 1889" by Various
There was no trace of lava to be seen, or of pumice, ashes, or of volcanic rejecta in any form whatever.
"Police!!!" by Robert W. Chambers
The roads leading to Quito cut through hills of pumice-dust.
"The Andes and the Amazon" by James Orton
There is no doubt that that great pumice-stone, Society, smooths down the edges of your thoughts and manners.
"The Young Duke" by Benjamin Disraeli
The shore of this island is very rocky, except the part we landed at, and here I picked up many pieces of pumice-stone.
"A Narrative Of The Mutiny, On Board His Majesty's Ship Bounty; And The Subsequent Voyage Of Part Of The Crew, In The Ship's Boat" by William Bligh
By this eruption Pompeii was buried under a layer of pumice and ashes 20 feet thick.
"From Pole to Pole" by Sven Anders Hedin
Now smooth'd to polish due with pumice dry Whereto this lively booklet new give I?
"The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus" by Caius Valerius Catullus
For callous spots rub with pumice stone.
"The Woman Beautiful" by Helen Follett Stevans
Now retama, a hardy bitter shrub, grows in these plains of pumice; the flats of it are pumice and rapilli, white and brown.
"A Tramp's Notebook" by Morley Roberts
She went ahead with Tashtu over the rocks and crushed pumice.
"A World Called Crimson" by Darius John Granger
To render it as light as possible, it was constructed of pumice stone and Rhodian bricks.
"Shepp's Photographs of the World" by James W. Shepp
He entered an abode built of pumice stone with its many holes, and the sand-stone far from smooth.
"The Metamorphoses of Ovid" by Publius Ovidius Naso
Then quickly succeeded shower of small pumice stones and heavier ashes, and emitting stifling eruptic fumes.
"Museum of Antiquity" by L. W. Yaggy
Put in half a tablespoonful of salt, a bunch of chopped straw, and a little grated pumice-stone, then add the rice.
"Punch - Volume 25 (Jul-Dec 1853)" by Various
I picked up a handful of pumice and let it sift through my fingers.
"The Colonists" by Raymond F. Jones
His body sank down into the thick pumice dust that drifted up around him in a fine powdery blanket of concealment.
"The Victor" by Bryce Walton
This eruption lasted three months, covering the sea with floating pumice.
"Principles of Geology" by Charles Lyell
Then they lay on the sand ten yards from it, and took shots at it with bits of pumice-stone.
"The Furnace" by Rose Macaulay
The masonry of the dome is of wedge-shaped pumice stones, chosen for this purpose on account of their lightness.
"Old Rome" by Robert Burn
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In news:

Hands Maid does not contain pumice, which many other cleansers on the market currently contain.
Characterizing and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Volcanic Pumice Exfoliants.
Characterizing and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Volcanic Pumice Exfoliants CosmeticsAndToiletries.com.
Mysterious pumice "island" in Pacific explained.
The power of pumice .
The Source of Kermadec Island Pumice Raft .
Terra image of the Havre plume and pumice, taken on the morning of July 18, 2012.
Volcanic ' raft ' likely a result of pumice being released by an underwater volcano near New Zealand.
A map showing the location and drift direction of significant pumice raft events over the last 200 years.
This eruption did, indeed, produce a small island that might have been as high as 75 meters tall, but wave action quickly destroyed the "island" of fragmental volcanic material into a pumice raft .
After the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, many Pompeiians fled into the streets in an attempt to escape the rain of pumice, gas and rock.
At the end of the summer, we had a volcanic mystery that took people across the planet to solve – the occurrence of a pumice raft in the sea near the Kermadec Islands.
Volcanic Ash and Pumice From Puyehue.
Scientists say the floating field of golf ball-sized pumice probably came from an underwater volcano and not from the eruption of Mount Tongariro.
An area of floating pumice is spotted southwest of Raoul island, off the coast of New Zealand.
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In science:

Glasses have been of use to mankind from early on, be it as arrowheads for the stone age people of Corsica and the Americas, the obsidian battle axes and swords of the Aztecs, pumice scrappers for animal hides, or the tektite ornaments and fertility symbols of our ancestors.
Formulation of thermodynamics for the glassy state: configurational energy as a modest source of energy
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