prohibitory

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj prohibitory tending to discourage (especially of prices) "the price was prohibitive"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Prohibitory Tending to prohibit, forbid, or exclude; implying prohibition; forbidding; as, a prohibitory law; a prohibitory price.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • prohibitory Serving to prohibit, forbid, or interdict; implying prohibition: as, prohibitory duties on imports.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Prohibitory that prohibits or forbids: forbidding
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. prohibitorius,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. prohibēre, prohibitumpro, before, habēre, to have.

Usage

In literature:

The fallacy of all prohibitory, sumptuary, and moral legislation is the same.
"What Social Classes Owe to Each Other" by William Graham Sumner
Reaching out a hand so white it was in itself a shock, he laid it in a certain prohibitory way on the pall, as if saying no.
"The Circular Study" by Anna Katharine Green
But this is the restrictive or prohibitory system in its simplest form.
"Sophisms of the Protectionists" by Frederic Bastiat
In 1883 the second petition for a prohibitory constitutional amendment was presented to the senate and assembly.
"Two Decades" by Frances W. Graham and Georgeanna M. Gardenier
Those deep, dark eyes have a strong prohibitory force.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 100, February, 1866" by Various
A prohibitory statute of Henry VII.
"Christmas: Its Origin and Associations" by William Francis Dawson
Quartz is upon the "index prohibitory" of Science.
"The Book of the Damned" by Charles Fort
Prohibitory legislation accords with the mores of the rural, but not of the urban, population.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
The prohibitory constitutional amendment was adopted.
"The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 5, Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 5, May, 1886" by Various
Cotton, for instance, was to pay nine pence a pound, an amount intended to be prohibitory; tobacco, three halfpence.
"Sea Power in its Relations to the War of 1812" by Alfred Thayer Mahan
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