premiss

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v premiss take something as preexisting and given
    • n premiss a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Premiss Premise.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n premiss See premise.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Premiss that which is premised or stated at the outset: a proposition previously stated or proved for after-reasoning:
    • n Premiss (logic) one of the two propositions in a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn: the thing set forth in the beginning of a deed
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Usage

In literature:

There is here a fact of great importance for ethical thought, no matter from what ultimate premiss it starts.
"Evolution in Modern Thought" by Ernst Haeckel
A fresh basis, or premiss, for them, is supplied.
"The Idea of God in Early Religions" by F. B. Jevons
It might be answered, 'Your first premiss was wrong, and until that be mended, further argument is unnecessary.
"The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886" by Various
This includes any Pair of Premisses which are both of them Nullities, and which contain Unlike Eliminands.
"Symbolic Logic" by Lewis Carroll
If the premiss here be sound, the inference may be owned to be sufficiently legitimate.
"Old-Fashioned Ethics and Common-Sense Metaphysics" by William Thomas Thornton
And perhaps neither a court of love nor an assembly of divines would have granted their premisses or welcomed their conclusions.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 9" by Robert Louis Stevenson
He does not attend to your premisses, and he never has any of his own!
"The Firebrand" by S. R. Crockett
The logic of this is bad enough, but even the premiss is false.
"Twentieth Century Socialism" by Edmond Kelly
I am not stating conclusions which were drawn out in the controversy, but of premisses which were laid, broad and deep.
"An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine" by John Henry Cardinal Newman
There was the admitted premiss and there was the obvious conclusion.
"A Grammar of Freethought" by Chapman Cohen
His rights are to be deduced from, not to supply the premisses for deducing, the social order.
"Social Rights And Duties" by Leslie Stephen
In all inference, form alone is essential: the particular subject-matter is irrelevant except as securing the truth of the premisses.
"Our Knowledge of the External World as a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy" by Bertrand Russell
That the conclusion does not follow even from this erroneous premiss, a very few words will suffice to prove.
"Darwin, and After Darwin, Volume II (of 3)" by George John Romanes
Now, there can be no doubt but that if the logician's premiss is true, the conclusion is unavoidable.
"Know the Truth; A critique of the Hamiltonian Theory of Limitation" by Jesse H. Jones
Now, a plot is much like a drama, and should have a beginning, a middle, and an end; answering roughly to premiss, argument, and conclusion.
"How to Write a Novel" by Anonymous
Grant this premiss, and what follows, or something better, may easily be rendered an accomplished fact.
"The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, October 1879" by Various
I do not concur with Ast in the estimation of those passages which serve as premisses to his conclusion.
"Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, 3rd ed. Volume II (of 4)" by George Grote
But I think this inference is not justified by the premisses.
"Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, 3rd ed. Volume III (of 4)" by George Grote
Let us grant for the present that this conclusion follows from his premisses.
"Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, 3rd ed. Volume IV (of 4)" by George Grote
Besides the premisses send sixe yards of skarlet, parchment lace of diuers colours.
"The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Volume XIV (of 16)" by Richard Hakluyt
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In science:

The premisses for the Scan attack are the possession of at least one valid account and knowledge about the scheme of SIP URIs of the targeted platform (e.g. provider).
SPAM over Internet Telephony and how to deal with it
Although this procedure is harder to fulfil than the first one, it has the ma jor advantage, that the attacker doesn’t need valid accounts as premiss.
SPAM over Internet Telephony and how to deal with it
In section 3, we will deal with n-term syllogisms and prove that the calculus extends to them, by showing in turn that the valid n-term syllogisms are exactly those whose conclusion follows from their premisses by calculation.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
We write syllogisms so that their mood and figure can be promptly retrieved and let the symbol |= separate the premisses from the conclusion.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
The combination of the moods and figures gives rise to 256 syllogisms in total, of which only 24 are valid, that is such that the verification of the premisses necessar ily entails the verification of the conclusion.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
Moreover, these involve three distinguished term-variables, denoted S , P and M , in such a way that M occurs in both the Aristotelian diagrams in the premisses and does not in the conclusion, whereas S and P occur in the conclusion as well as in the premisses.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
Aristotelian diagrams for its premisses to the Aristotelian diagram for its conclusion.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
More precisely, for a valid syllogism, the Aristotelian diagram for its conclusion contains as many bullet symbols as in the Aristotelian diagrams for its premisses.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
Aristotelian diagram for the conclusion, whereas three of them occur in those for the premisses.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
Theorem 2.1. A syllogism (with assumption of existence) is valid if and only if there is a necessarily unique syllogistic inference from its premisses to its conclusion.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
For every positive natural number n, an n-term syllogism is valid if and only if there is a (necessarily unique) syllogistic inference from its premisses to its conclusion.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
We let the length of a term be the number of Aristotelian diagrams by which it is formed, to which we will also refer to as premisses.
A diagrammatic calculus of n-term syllogisms
It should be noted, however, that these arguments hinge on a silent premiss, namely that the indices not only play a mathematical role but also possess physical signi ficance.
How Classical Particles Emerge From the Quantum World
Die string waarmee ’n berekening begin, noem ons soms die invoer, of gegewene, premisse, probleem, data, ens., afhangende van die aard van die berekening wat daarop toegepas moet word.
Quantum computing (Kwantumberekening)
Die invoer is die string p; p → q , genoem die premisse; die afvoer is q , genoem die konklusie; en die horisontale streep en die simbool ∴ dui op die transformasieprosedure ”logiese afleiding”, wat s ˆe dat as ons die bewering ” p ”weet of aanneem, asook ¨as p, dan q ”, dan mag ons die gevolgtrekking ” q ”maak.
Quantum computing (Kwantumberekening)
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