pleura

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n pleura the thin serous membrane around the lungs and inner walls of the chest
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Pleura pl. of Pleuron.
    • Pleura (Zoöl) Same as Pleuron.
    • Pleura (Anat) The closed sac formed by the pleural membrane about each lung, or the fold of membrane connecting each lung with the body wall.
    • Pleura (Anat) The smooth serous membrane which closely covers the lungs and the adjacent surfaces of the thorax; the pleural membrane.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • pleura The principal serous membrane of the thorax; the shut sac, having a serous surface, which lines the walls of the chest, and is reflected over the surface of each lung. There are two pleura, right and left, completely shut off from each other. Each is divided into a parietal or costal layer and a visceral or pulmonary layer. (See the phrases below.) Like the other serous membranes, the pleuræ are moistened with a serous secretion, which serves to facilitate the movements of the lungs in the chest. See cuts under peritoneum and thorax.
    • pleura In conchology, one of the lateral tracts on each side of the rachis of the lingual ribbon of the odontophore: generally used in the plural.
    • pleura In comparative anatomy, the lateral portion of one of the rings composing the integument of an arthropod or articulate animal, lying between the tergum and sternum, and in insects and crustaceans consisting of two pieces, the epimeron and episternum. In descriptive entomology the term is generally restricted to the side of the thorax, as in Diptera.
    • pleura All the parts of the pleura except the pulmonary portion.
    • n pleura Plural of pleuron.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pleura plōō′ra a delicate serous membrane which covers the lungs and lines the cavity of the chest
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., (n. fem.), fr. Gr. a rib, the side
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr., a rib.

Usage

In literature:

Each lung is covered, except at one point, with an elastic serous membrane in a double layer, called the pleura.
"A Practical Physiology" by Albert F. Blaisdell
The cavity of the chest in which the lungs are suspended is also lined by the pleura.
"First Book in Physiology and Hygiene" by J.H. Kellogg
It occasionally extends towards the thorax, where it may become adherent to the pleura.
"Manual of Surgery" by Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles
Inflammation of both the pleura and lungs.
"The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English" by R. V. Pierce
Accompanying these symptoms were the usual physical signs of fluid in the pleura in differing degrees and combination.
"Surgical Experiences in South Africa, 1899-1900" by George Henry Makins
There was an effusion to the extent of about sixteen ounces of light-brown fluid, found in the cavities of the pleura.
"An Investigation into the Nature of Black Phthisis" by Archibald Makellar
Ischia: = pleura; q.v.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
The pleura and diaphragm also showed a good deal of disease and some adhesion.
"Cattle and Their Diseases" by Robert Jennings
The pleura is a thin membrane that envelops the lung and lines the walls of the thoracic cavity.
"Special Report on Diseases of the Horse" by United States Department of Agriculture
The right cavity of the pleura contained a moderate quantity of water; the left, scarcely any.
"Cases of Organic Diseases of the Heart" by John Collins Warren
One cause of pleurisy is probably a previous adhesion of the lungs to a part of the pleura, which envelops them.
"Zoonomia, Vol. II" by Erasmus Darwin
In rare cases the pus opens into the pleura, giving rise to empyema.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition." by Alexander Miles
The diaphragm on its upper surface, highly injected, as was also the pleura lining the thorax.
"North American Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, July, 1826" by Various
The pleura, however, is opaque and apparently very much thickened.
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
What is the relative position of the lungs and pleura?
"A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition)" by Calvin Cutter
Examination of the chest reveals inflammation of the lungs and pleura.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
An inflammation affecting the pleura.
"A Treatise on Physiology and Hygiene" by Joseph Chrisman Hutchison
This symptom is mostly observable in cases when the pleura and pericardium are affected.
"The American Reformed Cattle Doctor" by George Dadd
The resulting abscesses may burst into the peritoneum, pleura, lung, or bowel.
"A System of Practical Medicine by American Authors, Vol. I" by Various
In short, an abscess in the pericardium must be treated like an abscess in the pleura.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 2" by Various
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In news:

Radiographic evaluation disclosed the presence of pleural effusion and thickening of the pleura.
A biopsy of the pleura was obtained.
Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma involving the pericardium and lung pleura.
Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare soft-tissue sarcomas usually arising in the pleura of the thoracic cavity.
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