piquance

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n piquance the quality of being agreeably stimulating or mentally exciting
    • n piquance a tart spicy quality
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Usage

In literature:

He must have felt a certain piquancy in writing down the most atrocious sentiments in his own respectable parlour.
"Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.)" by Leslie Stephen
The piquancy of that situation somehow complicated everything more darkly than before.
"The Best Short Stories of 1917" by Various
The presence of five Americans gave additional piquancy to the show.
"The Dodge Club" by James De Mille
A teaspoonful of lemon juice added the last thing will give additional piquancy to the sauce.
"New Vegetarian Dishes" by Mrs. Bowdich
The occasion was in a sense unique, and its piquancy strengthened by that rivalry which is the essence of religion.
"Tatterdemalion" by John Galsworthy
Our American life is dreadfully barren of those elements of the social picturesque which give piquancy to anecdote.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 121, November, 1867" by Various
Shooting with leave comes next, but is immeasurably inferior in point of piquancy.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 350, December 1844" by Various
It is this which gives that piquancy to the conversation of a strong-natured farmer or back-woodsman, which all men relish.
"Nature" by Ralph Waldo Emerson
The situation was not without picturesque piquancy for a collector of impressions.
"Kildares of Storm" by Eleanor Mercein Kelly
The portraits thus drawn are never wanting in piquancy nor in fidelity.
"Hours in a Library" by Leslie Stephen
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In news:

Marché Moderne is a celebration of cuisine in the classical French style, coupled with a modern piquancy of flavor and flair.
Marché Moderne is a celebration of cuisine in the classical French style, coupled with a modern piquancy of flavor and flair.
This Presidents Day holiday has taken on a peculiar kind of piquancy, particularly if your taste runs to passionate politics.
It had a nice piquancy, brought out by the sweet orange.
That phrase has a certain piquancy now, but Califano simply wanted to calm the witness, slow the process a bit and get everyone to chill out.
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