pinion

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v pinion cut the wings off (of birds)
    • v pinion bind the arms of
    • n pinion wing of a bird
    • n pinion any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
    • n pinion a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel or rack
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Pinion (Mech) A cogwheel with a small number of teeth, or leaves, adapted to engage with a larger wheel, or rack (see Rack); esp., such a wheel having its leaves formed of the substance of the arbor or spindle which is its axis.
    • Pinion A feather; a quill.
    • Pinion A fetter for the arm.
    • n Pinion (Zoöl) A moth of the genus Lithophane, as Lithophane antennata, whose larva bores large holes in young peaches and apples.
    • Pinion A wing, literal or figurative. "Swift on his sooty pinions flits the gnome."
    • Pinion Hence, generally, to confine; to bind; to tie up. "Pinioned up by formal rules of state."
    • Pinion The joint of bird's wing most remote from the body.
    • Pinion To bind or confine the wings of; to confine by binding the wings.
    • Pinion To disable by cutting off the pinion joint.
    • Pinion To disable or restrain, as a person, by binding the arms, esp. by binding the arms to the body. "Her elbows pinioned close upon her hips."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pinion A feather; especially, a remex or flight-feather.
    • n pinion The wing of a bird, or the flight-feathers collectively.
    • n pinion Technically, in ornithology, the joint of a bird's wing furthest from the body; the distal segment of the wing; the manus, consisting of the carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges, collectively bearing the primary remiges, or largest flight-feathers, and the alula or bastard-wing. Most adult birds show the seven separate bones of the pinion here figured; but in a few adults, and probably in all embryos, the osseous elements are more numerous.
    • n pinion In entomology, one of various moths: as, the brown-spot pinion, Anchocelis litura.
    • n pinion [⟨ pinion, verb] A shackle or band for the arm.
    • pinion To bind or confine the wings of (a bird); restrain or confine by binding the wings, or by cutting off the pinions; bind or confine (the wings). A very common but cruel method of pinioning, practised especially upon geese by poulterers, is to twist the pinion over the next joint of the wing, where it is confined by the primaries resting upon the secondaries.
    • pinion To bind or confine the arm or arms of (a person) to the body so as to disable or render incapable of resistance; shackle.
    • pinion To bind; attach as by bonds or shackles.
    • n pinion A small wheel with cogs or teeth which engage the teeth of a larger wheel with cogs or teeth, or sometimes only an arbor or spindle having notches or leaves, which are caught successively by the teeth of the wheel, and the motion thereby communicated. See also cut under pawl-press.
    • n pinion Same as piñon.
    • n pinion One of two wings or flat projections of any kind.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pinion pin′yun a wing: the joint of a wing most remote from the body of the bird: a small wheel with 'leaves' or teeth working into others
    • v.t Pinion to confine the wings of: to cut off the pinion: to confine by binding the arms
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. pignon, a pen, F., gable, pinion (in sense 5); cf. Sp. piñon, pinion; fr. L. pinna, pinnacle, feather, wing. See Pin a peg, and cf. Pen a feather, Pennat Pennon

Usage

In literature:

In his fall Clubfoot's left arm had been bent under him and was now pinioned to the ground by his great weight.
"The Man with the Clubfoot" by Valentine Williams
His arms were pinioned behind his back.
"A Friend of Caesar" by William Stearns Davis
She has calumniated her countrymen, and the slander has gone with electric speed on the pinions of the press, to the ends of the earth.
"A Review of Uncle Tom's Cabin" by A. Woodward
Until she heard the wild beating of tiny pinions!
"The Poor Little Rich Girl" by Eleanor Gates
It came at last, and threw its broad sable pinions over the dead, the dying, and the living.
"History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. Vol 1" by George W. Williams
Uncertainty around my anxious head Her dusky, thousand-folded, pinion waves.
"Iphigenia in Tauris" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
He came at last, after hours of waiting, dropping from above the tree-tops with a heavy rustling of pinions.
"Wilderness Ways" by William J Long
Now, overhead, betwixt the smoking earth and smiling sky, flocks of vultures come and go, fluttering their great pinions noiselessly.
"Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900)" by A. G. Hales
The next instant his arms were pinioned to his sides.
"The Gun-Brand" by James B. Hendryx
The poor boy, whose hands were pinioned behind him, looked very pale, but neither trembled, nor exhibited any other symptom of alarm.
"Jack Sheppard" by William Harrison Ainsworth
They were pinioned so tightly behind her that she could not move.
"Madge Morton, Captain of the Merry Maid" by Amy D. V. Chalmers
The pistol was out of his hand, and his arms were pinioned in an instant; while cries of 'Fair play, sir!
"Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1." by Various
Calling to his foot Swift Iris golden-pinion'd, thus he spake.
"The Iliad of Homer" by Homer
Like the rushing wings of a tempest, his mighty pinions beat the air and bore him swiftly onward.
"Myths That Every Child Should Know" by Various
At that instant I was seized and pinioned from behind.
"The Killer" by Stewart Edward White
Her arms were like bands of steel, and pinioned his own close to his side.
"Golden Days for Boys and Girls, Vol. XIII, Nov. 28, 1891" by Various
The pinions that bear him aloft through the clear ether will be of no usual or flagging sort.
"Horace and His Influence" by Grant Showerman
Doubt, that arch-enemy of love and faith and hope, doubt had spread its dark pinions and flown away into yesterdays.
"Parrot & Co." by Harold MacGrath
The end of the great pinion swept Laddie off his feet!
"Six Little Bunkers at Mammy June's" by Laura Lee Hope
Nothing stirred up there except a buzzard or two wheeling on tip-curled pinions above the palms.
"Police!!!" by Robert W. Chambers
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In poetry:

And then, transfix'd unto the floor,
I stood, in terror pinion'd there,
With drops of sweat upon my brow,
And eyes with fix'd and rigid stare.
"A Dream" by Thomas Frederick Young
"The more I feel the air beneath my feet
So much the more towards the wind I bend
My swiftest pinions
And spurn the world and up towards Heaven I go."
"The Heroic Enthusiasts - Part The Second =First Dialogue.=" by Giordano Bruno
And yet, my brothers, well I know
The tethered feet, the pinioned wings,
The spirit bowed beneath the blow,
The heart grown faint from wounds and stings;
"Fifty Years (1863-1913)" by James Weldon Johnson
But Hope shall lift her golden pinion,
And glad my soul with melting strains ;
Joy shall resume his gay dominion,
Shall beam once more on happier plains.
"The Lover's Departure" by Laura Sophia Temple
If these resolutions are acted up to,
And faith spreads her pinions abroad,
'Twill be sweet when I ponder the days may be few
That waft me away to my God.
"Resolutions For The Day" by Mary Baker Eddy
Unreconciled by life's fleet years, that fled
With changeful clang of pinions wide and wild,
Though two great spirits had lived, and hence had sped
Unreconciled;
"Discord" by Algernon Charles Swinburne

In news:

U nlike most teams who play club volleyball during the offseason, members of the Pinion Lady Eagles volleyball team play recreationally outside on dirt volleyball courts.
"This is the first time in history we have gone undefeated and to state," said Pinion head coach Nellie McCurtain.
Thus, cars now have rack-and-pinion steering.
The area around the pinion is one of the most stressed areas in a quick change, and the extra material here should help keep stress cracks from showing up.
Chrysler is recalling thousands of Ram 1500 and Dodge Dakota trucks because of a problem with a rear axle pinion nut that could cause the driver to lose control of the vehicle.
Rack and pinion clamp drive.
Readers' Choice: Frank O Pinion.
Steering type/ratio Rack and pinion, Recirculating ball, Rack and pinion.
Theron Russell Pinion — 77, died this morning at Baptist Memorial Hospital- North Mississippi in Oxford.
Mitt Romney sits between Mary Pinion of Tampa, Fla. Left, and Todd Swift of Lutz, Fla. As he holds a discussion on housing and foreclosure on Jan 23, 2012.
Victor Valley Shooters owner Jay Stedt shows Jason Garzon of Pinion Hills a Mossberg shotgun on Tuesday.
2928 Pinion Circle, Craig, CO. 250 South 3rd Street, Hayden, CO. 466 Yampa Avenue, Craig, CO. Jims Custom Drywall Painting and Maintenance.
The RZ 60 from Reishauer has been optimized for machining planetary pinions for the automotive industry.
Machine Optimized for Planetary Pinions.
For instance, this five-pinion rear planetary assembly out of a 4L85E is substantially stronger than the TH400's four-pinion unit, as it distributes torque over a greater surface area.
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In science:

For the drive systems, VertexRSI uses a traditional pinion and gear rack system, while AEC uses a direct linear drive, applied for instance in the Very Large Telescope (VLT) optical telescopes or the Berkeley Illinois Maryland Association (BIMA) antennas.
Evaluation of the ALMA Prototype Antennas
However, we do not discuss work at the document level, as the target of our work is not to examine the overall sentiment of the review, but the detailed (and thus finer grained) o pinions within the review.
Product Review Summarization based on Facet Identification and Sentence Clustering
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