pillage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v pillage steal goods; take as spoils "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
    • n pillage the act of stealing valuable things from a place "the plundering of the Parthenon","his plundering of the great authors"
    • n pillage goods or money obtained illegally
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Pillage That which is taken from another or others by open force, particularly and chiefly from enemies in war; plunder; spoil; booty. "Which pillage they with merry march bring home."
    • Pillage The act of pillaging; robbery.
    • v. i Pillage To strip of money or goods by open violence; to plunder; to spoil; to lay waste; as, to pillage the camp of an enemy. "Mummius . . . took, pillaged , and burnt their city."
    • v. i Pillage To take spoil; to plunder; to ravage. "They were suffered to pillage wherever they went."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pillage The act of plundering.
    • n pillage Plunder; spoil; that which is taken from another by open force, particularly and chiefly from enemies in war.
    • n pillage Synonyms Pillage, Plunder, Booty, Spoil, Prey. These words denote that which is violently got or carried off; all except prey suggest a considerable amount seized. Pillage also denotes the act; the others only the thing or things taken. Pillage and spoil especially suggest the great loss to the owners, completely stripping or despoiling them of their property; plunder suggests the quantity and value of that which is taken: as, loaded with plunder; booty is primarily the spoils of war, but also of a raid or combined action, as of pirates, brigands, or burglars; spoil is the only one of these words that is used in the plural, except, rarely, prey. Prey now seems figurative or archaic when not applied to the objects of pursuit by animals: as, the mouse falls a ready prey to both beasts and birds; hence, when applied to that which is pursued or taken by man, it expresses condemnation of the act.
    • pillage To strip of money or goods by open violence; plunder; despoil.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pillage pil′āj (Shak.) act of plundering: plunder: spoil, esp. taken in war
    • v.t Pillage to plunder or spoil
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Quotations

  • Marianne Moore
    Marianne Moore
    “War is pillage versus resistance and if illusions of magnitude could be transmuted into ideals of magnanimity, peace might be realized.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F., fr. piller, to plunder. See Pill to plunder

Usage

In literature:

Each year witnessed a fresh massacre, pillage, plunder, and shedding of blood.
"Epistle to the Son of the Wolf" by Bahá’u’lláh
Pillaging and burning and unopposed, they were spreading everywhere.
"Indiscreet Letters From Peking"
His armed retainers pillaged the markets.
"History of the English People, Volume II (of 8)" by John Richard Green
They apparently made war for the mere pleasure of slaying, ravaging, and pillaging.
"History Of Ancient Civilization" by Charles Seignobos
There the complaints of the Poles, whom our allies pillaged without mercy, and insulted, reached him.
"History of the Expedition to Russia" by Count Philip de Segur
But had not Mr. Hastings himself just before encouraged the military to pillage the country?
"The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. XI. (of 12)" by Edmund Burke
It is probable that the servants, finding their master's absence continue, had pillaged the house and fled.
"Arthur Mervyn" by Charles Brockden Brown
The officer and the soldier who will pillage their winter quarters, if one lets them, have they a very warm love for the peasants they ruin?
"Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary" by Voltaire
There are numerous cities and villages where everything has been pillaged by the German requisitions.
"The New York Times Current History: the European War, February, 1915" by Various
The day has been dreadful with stories of suffering and murder and pillage.
"A Journal From Our Legation in Belgium" by Hugh Gibson
This time he used no ceremony; it might be called a general pillage.
"The Vicomte de Bragelonne" by Alexandre Dumas
The citizens were granted easy terms, and all pillage was strictly forbidden.
"The Red Book of Heroes" by Leonora Blanche Lang
This country alone of the original alliance has been spared pillage.
"Raemaekers' Cartoons" by Louis Raemaekers
He burned the cathedral and the hospital, pillaged the houses and razed most of the city to the ground.
"The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century" by Clarence Henry Haring
Pillaging is formally prohibited.
"Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights" by Kelly Miller
The dreaded pillage, however, was converted into a regular exaction.
"The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. From William and Mary to George II." by Tobias Smollett
The pinnaces came aboard the sinking ship, and the men pillaged her of all her stores.
"On the Spanish Main" by John Masefield
Meanwhile they made every effort to escape from pillage at the hands of men-at-arms.
"The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2)" by Anatole France
And have this house pillaged?
"A Confederate Girl's Diary" by Sarah Margan Dawson
The people heartily shared his determination to rival Spain, and to pillage Spain.
"Sir Walter Ralegh" by William Stebbing
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In poetry:

Rich with the dreamer's pillage,
An idle and worthless lad,
Least in a prosy village,
And prince in Allahabad;
"The Poet's Town" by John Gneisenau Neihardt
The battle went by the village,
And back through the night were borne
Far cries of murder and pillage,
With smoke from the standing corn.
"Two Folk Songs" by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch
TRUST and Treachery, Wisdom, Folly,
Madness, Mirth and Melancholy,
Love and Hatred, Thrift and Pillage,
All are housed in one small village.
"The Flight of Peace" by Charles Harpur
Oft stooping as she stray'd, she cull'd the pride
Of every plain; she pillaged every grove!
The fading chaplet daily she supplied,
And still her hand some various garland wove.
"Elegy XVI. He Suggests the Advantage of Birth To a Person of Merit" by William Shenstone
And 'hence' I said, that Andrew's boys
Will all be trained to waste and pillage;
And wished the press-gang, or the drum
With its tantara sound, would come
And sweep him from the village.
"Andrew Jones" by William Wordsworth
Shame, oh! shame to the Nation that leaves the demon of Traffic
Free to roam through the land, and pillage and rob the helpless.
Shame to the multitude that will not render assistance,
But leaves a few to do what many can only accomplish.
"The Cry Of The People" by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

In news:

Erin Fisker of PR-B finished 35th at the Pillager Invitational on Thursday, Sept 20.
Brother/sister lead Patriots at Pillager Invitational.
Caitie and Mike Ryan of Pequot Lakes were among the top finishers at the Pillager Invitational.
Food-Stamp Pillaging : More From Josh Green.
Two Fresh, Now You See Them, Pillage and Plunder , Pepper.
Seattle Seafair Pirates will be sailing their way into the Valley to pillage, plunder and cause a ruckus at Snoqualmie Railroad Days.
Three decades of pillage by Mobutu Sese Seko, the dictator who was propped up by the country's riches and the cold war patronage of the United States, had ravaged the land that Mr Mobutu had renamed Zaire.
The Pillager School Administration and Board have voted to put a $14.055 million building referendum on the ballot.
Your mother docks in town, attempting to convince herself that you are not leading a life of thievery, assault and pillage.
James, along with his brother Frank and various other associates, had robbed and pillaged their way across the 19th century American frontier.
Brainerd Dispatch/Kelly Humphrey Terry Anderson lined the football field for the last time at Pillager High School last week.
Naomi Anderson, daughter of Craig and Brenda Anderson of Pine River, and Caleb Horn , son of Tim and Patty Horn of Pillager are pleased to announce their engagement.
It's not bad that Pillager needs space.
Pillaging Iraq in pursuit of a neocon utopia.
Good news, criminals: As long as everyone in your general vicinity is sippin' on a beer, you may rape , murder, and pillage at your leisure.
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