pickaninny

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n pickaninny (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Pickaninny A small child; especially, a negro or mulatto infant. Now (2001) used primarily in the latter sense, and in that sense often considered derogatory.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pickaninny See piccaninny.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pickaninny a little child: an African or negro child.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. Sp. pequeño, little, young
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Perh. from Sp. pequeño niño='little child.'

Usage

In literature:

Bumbye de Affiky oomans, 'e hab one putty lil pickaninny; 'e lub um ha'd all over.
"Nights With Uncle Remus" by Joel Chandler Harris
The weest pickaninny spat it out and squalled because the turpentine burned his tongue.
"When Grandmamma Was New" by Marion Harland
And still behind her a severe-faced young woman in a tailored suit was drawing her skirts away from two almost naked pickaninnies.
"The Sunbridge Girls at Six Star Ranch" by Eleanor H. (Eleanor Hodgman) Porter
Bumbye de Affiky oomans, 'e hab one putty lil pickaninny; 'e lub um ha'd all over.
"Nights With Uncle Remus" by Joel Chandler Harris
She'll give you a few, fer de baby cain't chew, An' de Pickaninny sholy won't cry.
"Negro Folk Rhymes" by Thomas W. Talley
Seated in a half circle on the grass were clustered the pickaninnies and their grinning forebears.
"Sunlight Patch" by Credo Fitch Harris
Men like overseers and lawyers never take account of one little pickaninny among a hundred.
"The Bondwoman" by Marah Ellis Ryan
A man rid up on a hoss and tell massa to git us pickaninnies out dat tree or dey git kilt.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves." by Work Projects Administration
I doctored the sick pickaninny of my host, and made the family a pot of strong coffee.
"Voyage of the Paper Canoe" by Nathaniel H. Bishop
There was one savage lady with a savage dorter and a pickaninny about rising four, as grately surprised me.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 93, July 9, 1887." by Various
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