pannier

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n pannier set of small hoops used to add fullness over the hips
    • n pannier a large basket (usually one of a pair) carried by a beast of burden or on by a person
    • n pannier either of a pair of bags or boxes hung over the rear wheel of a vehicle (as a bicycle)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Pannier A bread basket; also, a wicker basket (used commonly in pairs) for carrying fruit or other things on a horse or an ass
    • Pannier A framework of steel or whalebone, worn by women to expand their dresses; a kind of bustle.
    • Pannier (Mil. Antiq) A shield of basket work formerly used by archers as a shelter from the enemy's missiles.
    • Pannier A table waiter at the Inns of Court, London.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pannier A bread-basket; a basket for provisions; hence, any wicker basket.
    • n pannier One of a pair of baskets slung across the back of a beast of burden to contain a load.
    • n pannier A basket for carrying objects on the back of a man or woman, used in mountainous countries and where the use of beasts of burden is not common.
    • n pannier An adjunct of female dress, intended to distend the drapery of the skirt at the hips. It consisted essentially of a light framework of whalebone or steel wire of suitable form, secured at the waist; it is now also made of the material of the dress, puffed and made full.
    • n pannier A part of woman's head-dress; a stiff frame, as of wicker or wire, to maintain the head-dress in place.—6. In arch., same as corbel.
    • n pannier A shield of twisted osiers used in the middle ages by archers, who fixed it in the ground in anupright position and stood behind it.
    • n pannier In hydraulic engineering, a basket or wickerwork gabion filled with gravel or sand, used in the construction of dikes, or to protect embankments, etc., from the erosion of water.
    • n pannier In the inns of court, formerly, a servant who laid the cloths, set the salt-cellars, cut bread, waited on the gentlemen in term-time, blew the horn as a summons to dinner, and rang the bell; now, one of the domestics who wait in the hall of the inns at the time of dinner. Also pannier-man.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pannier pan′yėr or pan′i-ėr a bread-basket: one of two baskets thrown across a horse's back, for carrying light produce to market:
    • n Pannier pan′yėr or pan′i-ėr (archit.) a corbel: a contrivance for puffing out a woman's dress at the hips: a piece of basket-work for protecting archers, or, when filled with gravel or sand, for forming and protecting dikes, embankments, &c
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. panier, fr. L. panarium, a bread basket, fr. panis, bread. Cf. Pantry
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. panier—L. panarium, a bread-basket—panis, bread.

Usage

In literature:

Well, well, bustle or pannier, call it what you like; but only donkeys wore panniers in my young days, and many's the ride I've had in them.
"The Peace Egg and Other tales" by Juliana Horatia Ewing
The children were securely seated in things like padded panniers, and they had had an exciting day.
"The Magic City" by Edith Nesbit
Tanda led one of the buffaloes with huge panniers on his back.
"In the Eastern Seas" by W.H.G. Kingston
Here we spread the viands which had been brought in a pannier on the back of one of the mules.
"In New Granada" by W.H.G. Kingston
I fear my beautiful specimens are spoiled in the pannier here.
"Trapped by Malays" by George Manville Fenn
The children had been meantime tumbled into their panniers, and the nurse mounted on her mule.
"The Young Llanero" by W.H.G. Kingston
Just at that moment I caught a glimpse of a fisher lass with a pannier rounding the corner.
"Border Ghost Stories" by Howard Pease
I overtook a fishman asleep on his panniers on a very cold frosty night, but on waking him he did not appear to be in any degree of stupor.
"Zoonomia, Vol. II" by Erasmus Darwin
Arms, saddles, karosses, blankets, clothing, panniers of provisions and boxes of ammunition, were piled about in mountainous heaps.
"The Dop Doctor" by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
After the string of women came along a youth, with two small donkeys, laden with panniers full of green vegetables.
"In the Tail of the Peacock" by Isabel Savory
Many things were wanted, and on such occasions Crop did not object to carry panniers.
"The Fairchild Family" by Mary Martha Sherwood
Eliza came out of the room, grim as ever, and gave the pannier a discontented jerk or two.
"The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals" by Ann S. Stephens
Chemerant was in the room of the Gascon when the pannier was brought in.
"A Romance of the West Indies" by Eugène Sue
See this buff poplin with the panniers just has to have a bustle.
"Chicken Little Jane on the Big John" by Lily Munsell Ritchie
The most of their luggage had been left to go to Mahon by mule pannier on the morrow.
"The Recipe for Diamonds" by Charles John Cutcliffe Wright Hyne
Small donkeys with panniers were used instead of wagons for the transfer of almost every kind of material in the city and country.
"A Trip to the Orient" by Robert Urie Jacob
Brush up your Latin, and out with a few of the largest trouts in your pannier.
"Recreations of Christopher North, Volume I (of 2)" by John Wilson
A donkey with heavy panniers at his side, driven by an old man; a woman followed, and after her a girl's figure.
"Gerald Fitzgerald The Chevalier" by Charles James Lever
He nodded pleasantly to the men, and, proceeding to his mules, took out of one of the panniers a large vessel filled with wine.
"Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume I" by Various
Then he turned to one of his mates, "Fetch along that 'ere medicine pannier," he said shortly.
"With Wolseley to Kumasi" by F.S. Brereton
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In poetry:

Meanwhile, the poor Neddy, in torture and fear,
Lay under his panniers, scarce able to groan;
And — what was still dolefuller - lending an ear
To advisers, whose ears were a match for his own.
"The Donkey and His Panniers" by Thomas Moore
A Donkey, whose talent for burdens was wondrous,
So much that you'd swear he rejoic'd in a load,
One day had to jog under panniers so pond'rous,
That — down the poor Donkey fell smack on the road!
"The Donkey and His Panniers" by Thomas Moore
At length, a plain rustic, whose wit went so far
As to see others' folly, roar'd out, as he pass'd —
"Quick — off with the panniers, all dolts as ye are,
Or, your prosperous Neddy will soon kick his last!"
"The Donkey and His Panniers" by Thomas Moore

In news:

The lightweight Overlander 30 pannier system, new from Kriega, offers a frameless -fit strap setup that features two of the company's waterproof and dustproof 15-liter Drypacks.
The lightweight Overlander 30 pannier system, new from Kriega, offers a frameless-fit strap setup that features two of the company's waterproof and dustproof 15-liter Drypacks.
Pannier Leaves REALTORS FCU.
I prefer and use the Topeak rack and panniers for commuting and initially thought the child seat by the same company would be a no brainer.
Let your bike do the heavy lifting and opt for a pannier, a pair of bags that drapes over your rear rack.
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