pandanus

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n pandanus any of various Old World tropical palmlike trees having huge prop roots and edible conelike fruits and leaves like pineapple leaves
    • n pandanus fiber from leaves of the pandanus tree; used for woven articles (such as mats)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • prop. n Pandanus (Bot) A genus of endogenous plants, native to tropical lands from Africa to Polynesia. See Screw pine.
    • Pandanus Any of various Old World tropical palmlike trees having huge prop roots and pineapplelike leaves and edible conelike fruits; also called the screw pine.
    • Pandanus Fiber from leaves of the pandanus tree; used for woven articles (such as mats).
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pandanus The screw-pine, a genus of plants, type of the order Pandaneæ, distinguished by its one-ovuled carpels. It includes about 50 species, all tropical, natives especially of the Malayan, Mascarene, and Seychelles islands, with a few on the Australian, African, and Asiatic continents. They are usually erect, with robust or slender trunk, unbranched or with upwardly curved candelabrum-like branches, which produce strong aërial roots. The roundish fruit is often pendulous and sheathed with colored bracts. See Screw-pine, chandelier-tree, keora-oil, and tent-tree.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pandanus pan-dā′nus the screw-pipe, the typical genus of the Pandaneæ.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Malay pandan,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Malay.

Usage

In literature:

There were canes, and bushes, and broad leaves of the pandanus and other trees in abundance.
"Ben Hadden" by W.H.G. Kingston
Amid them rose conspicuously cocoanut-palms, and pandanus.
"The Cruise of the Dainty" by William H. G. Kingston
A few cocoa-nut and pandanus trees, however, grew on it, and a scant herbage.
"Twice Lost" by W.H.G. Kingston
Pandanus grows there, but they can't grow sweet potatoes nor taro.
"A Son Of The Sun" by Jack London
Two pandanuses frame the view, their long leaves waving softly in the breeze that comes floating down the valley.
"Two Years with the Natives in the Western Pacific" by Felix Speiser
On his way he passed many of the lofty pandanus or screw pine-trees.
"The Giraffe Hunters" by Mayne Reid
Pandanus luzonensis attains a greater height than Pandanus tectorius, but has narrower leaves than the latter.
"Philippine Mats" by Hugo H. Miller
The pandanus comes next in importance, being also a food tree; and he, too, does bravely.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 18 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Both Louis and Lloyd wear wreaths of artificial flowers, made of the dried pandanus leaf, on their hats.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 24 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
There is a certain kind of girdle, made from the pandanus leaves, which is the peculiar possession of the married women.
"Oriental Women" by Edward Bagby Pollard
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