pallidly

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adv pallidly in a manner lacking interest or vitality "a palely entertaining show"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • adv Pallidly In a pallid manner.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • pallidly With pallidity; palely; wanly.
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Quotations

  • Benjamin Disraeli
    Benjamin%20Disraeli
    “You behold a range of exhausted volcanoes. Not a flame flickers on a single pallid crest.”

Usage

In literature:

Beneath it, the dark skin was pallid, but the breath came easily from the sleeping lips.
"Mr. Achilles" by Jennette Lee
Th' haggard face, th' droopin' eye, th' pallid complexion that marks th' inimy iv thrusts is not to me taste.
"Observations by Mr. Dooley" by Finley Peter Dunne
He was pallid and his lips were blue when Emissary Orne came waddling into the office.
"When Egypt Went Broke" by Holman Day
Under the pallid texture of his skin there began to burn a slow and growing flush.
"The River's End" by James Oliver Curwood
The sun had set; the pallid daylight lingering along the forest edges by the river grew sickly and died.
"The Hidden Children" by Robert W. Chambers
One morning the pallid man in brown suit who had haunted the various depots of the city for several days made a discovery.
"Dyke Darrel the Railroad Detective" by Frank Pinkerton
Pallid fades in the dread unrest.
"The Home of the Blizzard" by Douglas Mawson
The pallid Fray Salvi at last concluded to venture out from his hiding-place, and went down the stairs.
"The Social Cancer" by José Rizal
His eyes were dim, and his face was pallid with emotion.
"The Battle Ground" by Ellen Glasgow
Why does the poet call the bust of Pallas "pallid"?
"Elson Grammar School Literature, Book Four." by William H. Elson
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In poetry:

Pallid days arid and wan
Tied your soul fast.
Babel-cities smoky tops
Pressed upon your growth
"Girl To A Soldier On leave" by Isaac Rosenberg
The morning frost shines gray
Along the misty field
Beneath the pallid way
Of early dawn revealed.
"Early Away" by Eduard Morike
O pallid grew the gentle dame,
And tremulous her tone,
As Laura Secord, at the board,
Made all her errand known.
"A Ballad Of 1812" by Sarah Anne Curzon
"Athwart the swinging branches cast,
Soft rays of sunshine pour;
Then comes the fearful wintry blast;
Our hopes, like withered leaves, fall fast;
Pallid lips say, 'It is past!
We can return no more!'
"Voices Of The Night : Prelude" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Swam before us the field of our shame, and our souls walked afar;
Saw the glory, the blaze of the sun bursting over Dunbar;
Saw the faces of friends, in the morn riding jocund to fight;
Saw the stern pallid faces again, as we saw them at night!
"Two Moods Of Failure" by Helen Gray Cone
Love lends to life its grandeur and its might;
Love goes, and leaves behind it gloom and blight;
Like ghosts of time the pallid hours drag by,
And grief's one happy thought is that we die.
Ah, what can recompense us for its flight
When love is lost?
"When Love Is Lost" by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

In news:

Was Anna Kendrick swimming in her pallid yellow Emilio Pucci mini.
Alexander Korda's opulent Arabian Nights fantasy (1940) suffers from pallid performances and frequently succumbs to kitsch, but it still casts its fragile spell.
When the earliest eateries from that remote region of China first appeared on the Upper West Side in the '70s, they were palaces of the pallid, with a sticky-sweet stir-fry of baby shrimp in a barely spicy red sauce as their marquee dish.
Although Fauchon's Madison Avenue branch still offers a pallid variety of gelato, stick to the croissants .
It was a pallid, perfectly bisected square.
'Scoundrels': Pallid remake of New Zealand series.
Pallid 's PR problem.
Can pallid sturgeon hang on in the overworked Missouri River.
They are a pallid, parasitic sort of thing whose fungal relatives infest your feet.
Like a zombie playing opossum, the fifth and final entry in the pallid %22Twilight%22 franchise makes one last, uproarious grasp for attention.
Fifty Januaries ago, under a pallid sun and amid bitter winds, John F Kennedy swore the oath that every president had taken since 1789 and then delivered one of the most memorable inaugural addresses in the American canon.
The light will shift from muted gold to the pallid gray of winter.
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