otter

Definitions

  • Angry otter
    Angry otter
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n otter freshwater carnivorous mammal having webbed and clawed feet and dark brown fur
    • n otter the fur of an otter
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Sea otters have the thickest fur of all animals.
    • n Otter A corruption of Annotto.
    • Otter (Zoöl) Any carnivorous animal of the genera Lutra Enhydra, and related genera of the family Mustelidae. Several species are described. They have large, flattish heads, short ears, and webbed toes. They are aquatic, and feed on fish. The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) also eats clams, crabs, starfish, abalone, and other marine animals; they may come to the surface, and lying on their backs using the stomach as a table, may be seen cracking open the shell of its prey with a rock. The common otter of Europe is Lutra vulgaris; the North American otteror American otter) is Lutra Canadensis, which inhabits marshes, streams and rivers; other species inhabit South America and Asia. The North American otter adult is about three to four feet long (including the tail) and weighs from 10 to 30 pounds; the sea otter is commonly four feet long and 45 pounds (female) or 60 pounds (male). Their fur is soft and valuable, and in the nineteenth century they were hunted extensively. The sea otter was hunted to near extinction by 1900, and is now protected. Fewer than 3,000 sea otters are believed to live along the central California coast.
    • Otter (Zoöl) The larva of the ghost moth. It is very injurious to hop vines.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n otter An aquatic digitigrade carnivorous mammal of the order Feræ, family Mustelidæ and subfamily Lutrinæ. There are several genera, as Barangia (or Leptonyx), Aonyx, Lontra (or Saricovia), Lutra proper, Hydrogale, and Pteronura. They all have large flattish heads, short ears, webbed toes, crooked nails, and tails slightly flattened horizontally. The common river-otter, the Lutra vulgaris of Europe, is a quadruped adapted to amphibious habits by its short, strong, flexible, palmated feet, which serve as oars to propel it through the water, and by its long and strong tail, which acts as a powerful rudder, and enables the animal to change its course with great ease and rapidity. It inhabits the banks of rivers, and feeds principally on fish. When its retreat is found, the otter instantly takes the water and dives, remaining a long time underneath it, and rising at a considerable distance from the place where it dived. The weight of a full-grown male is from 20 to 24 pounds, and its length is about 2 feet exclusive of the tail. In many parts of England, and especially in Wales, the otter is hunted with dogs trained for this purpose. The other species of Lutra proper, which are found in different parts of the world, do not differ greatly from the European otter. The American otter is a quite distinct species, Lutra (Latax) canadensis. Some Asiatic otters with reduced claws constitute the genus Aonyx. There are South American otters, as Lutra brasiliensis and L. chilensis. The most remarkable form is the winged-tailed or margin-tailed otter of South America, Pteronura sandbachi. The fur of otters is valuable. One kind of it, from South America, is known as nutria.
    • n otter The sea-otter. See Enhydris.
    • n otter The larva of the ghost-moth, Epialus humuli, which is very destructive to hop-plantations.
    • n otter A tackle with line and flies, used for fishing below the surface in lakes and rivers.
    • n otter A breed of sheep: same as ancon, 3.
    • n otter A corruption of arnotto.
    • n otter Same as attar.
    • otter To hunt otters with dogs.
    • otter To fish with a fioat and hooks. See otter-board.
    • otter To fish with line and flies. See otter, n., 4.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Otter ot′ėr a large kind of weasel living entirely on fish.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. oter, AS. otor,; akin to D. & G. otter, Icel. otr, Dan. odder, Sw. utter, Lith. udra, Russ, vuidra, Gr. "y`dra water serpent, hydra, Skr. udra, otter, and also to E. water,. √137, 215. See Water, and cf. Hydra
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. otor, oter; cf. Dut. and Ger. otter.

Usage

In literature:

You may see Ferndean and Otter, if you can consent to go there, and dwell there as a grave man's friend and wife.
"Girlhood and Womanhood" by Sarah Tytler
Otter hunting is another of the Seminole industries.
"The Seminole Indians of Florida" by Clay MacCauley
I hear them call you Otter, and truly the beast is no better swimmer than you are.
"Under Drake's Flag" by G. A. Henty
Then she went down the path beyond the esplanade, between the sea and marshes, to the mouth of the swift-flowing Otter.
"Happy Pollyooly" by Edgar Jepson
It seems that the otter hunters trapped these foxes for their tails, then let them go.
"A Truthful Woman in Southern California" by Kate Sanborn
A sea-otter may bring more, but I doubt it.
"Canoe Mates in Canada" by St. George Rathborne
It was a magnificent sea-otter, five feet long and very valuable.
"The Literary World Seventh Reader" by Various
She ottered a loud shriek, and fainted away.
"The Fairy Book" by Dinah Maria Mulock (AKA Miss Mulock)
A quick blow of the bludgeon; the otter never knows how death came.
"Vikings of the Pacific" by Agnes C. Laut
Loki killed the otter with a stone.
"The Mysteries of All Nations" by James Grant
We made our way through the tangled bushes, brush and woods, down to Otter Brook.
"A Busy Year at the Old Squire's" by Charles Asbury Stephens
Presently the Otter returned home, bringing a string of fish with him.
"Childhood's Favorites and Fairy Stories" by Various
More martens were captured, increasing the number of marten pelts to nine, and Toby shot an otter.
"Left on the Labrador" by Dillon Wallace
The sea otter is like neither otter nor beaver, though possessing habits akin to both.
"Canada: the Empire of the North" by Agnes C. Laut
I reckon I otter know, seein' I was one on 'em tew help run him out.
"The Cave of Gold" by Everett McNeil
Several fine sea otters were seen in front, playing about amongst the weeds.
"The Wizard of the Sea" by Roy Rockwood
Indians, gay in fringes and beads, arrived on the scene with loads of fur: otter, mink, fox, and beaver for trade.
"Some Three Hundred Years Ago" by Edith Gilman Brewster
He seized his rifle and leaped to his feet, hoping for a shot at a stray otter.
"The Promise" by James B. Hendryx
After it had spread over various commonplaces, it took a more definite form, in regard to an invisible otter which plundered the abbey ponds.
"En Route" by J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
It somewhat resembles the otter, and differs in shape slightly from the marten or ferret.
"The Western World" by W.H.G. Kingston
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In poetry:

The Nine-Pillared Cromlech, the Bride-streams,
The Axe, and the Otter
I passed, to the gate of the city
Where Exe scents the sea;
"My Cicely" by Thomas Hardy
Alone the dead trees yielding
To the dull axe Time is wielding,
The shy mink and the otter,
And golden leaves and red,
By countless autumns shed,
Had floated down its water.
"Voyage of the Jettie" by John Greenleaf Whittier
Come rise up full soon, come rise up and go,
The mist's on the hill and the river runs low:
While the dew's on the meadows it's up and away
A-hunting the otter at break o' the day.
"Otter Hunting In Ribblesdale" by Cicely Fox Smith
A health to good fellowship fill we now high,
You true-hearted sportsmen afar and anigh,
Here's many a good chase when the morning is grey,
A-hunting the otter at break o' the day.
"Otter Hunting In Ribblesdale" by Cicely Fox Smith
Through yon little planting, by yonder streamside,
Where Ribble's sweet waters flow softly and wide,
While the dew's on the meadows it's up and away,
A-hunting the otter at break o' the day.
"Otter Hunting In Ribblesdale" by Cicely Fox Smith
No bridge arched thy waters save that where the trees
Stretched their long arms above thee and kissed in the breeze:
No sound save the lapse of the waves on thy shores,
The plunging of otters, the light dip of oars.
"The Bridal of Pennacook" by John Greenleaf Whittier

In news:

Unprecedented number of sea otter deaths along California coast.
Greg gave an example of an annual sea-otter -themed bike tour held on the southern Pacific coast.
Greg advised working with the sea otter s.
Lynne Terry/The Oregonian Sgt Pete Simpson, a Portland police spokesman, cradles a 75-pound bronze sea otter that was stolen in May Hours after asking the public for help, police found the owner.
Sea otter nursed back to health set free Monday.
Sea otter released into Kachemak Bay.
MONTEREY, CA (BRAIN)—Organizers of the Sea Otter Classic announced the addition of cyclocross races to the annual four-day race and outdoor festival next year.
Hearings Set For Ventura, Santa Barbara On Failed Sea Otter Relocation Plan.
The first of two local public hearings on a proposal to officially end a failed program to try to help endangered sea otter s is set to take place this week.
A sea otter that can be easily seen from the sea wall at Depoe Bay.
Since 1995, the population of California sea otter s has plunged to just over 2,000 individuals.
Seattle's sea otter pup finally gets a name.
Video of a sea otter escaping killer whales by jumping onto a boat in Alaska is circling the internet Saturday.
GrindTV.com said the sea otter was able to save herself as the whales continue to circle the boat.
There's a big effort under way to bring sea otter s back to the Oregon Coast, with the Oregon Zoo playing a key role through hosting Sea Otter Awareness Week.
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In science:

The number mj of such trees of size j was studied by Otter (1948), who showed that mj ∼ cρ−j j −5/2 , where ρ < 1, and gave values for both ρ and c.
Random Combinatorial structures:the convergent case
Kschischang, and R. K ¨otter, “A rank-met ric approach to error-control in random network coding,” IEEE Trans. on Inform.
Recursive Code Construction for Random Networks
Otter-Dwass formula for the branching process total progeny.
Critical behavior in inhomogeneous random graphs
Our proofs make crucial use of the Otter-Dwass formula, which describes the distribution of the total progeny of a branching process (see for the special case when the branching process starts with a single individual and for the more general case, and for a simple proof based on induction).
Critical behavior in inhomogeneous random graphs
Unfortunately, the Otter-Dwass formula (Lemma 3.5) is not directly valid for T (2) , and we first establish that, for every k ≥ 0, P(T (2) ≥ k) ≤ P(T ≥ k).
Critical behavior in inhomogeneous random graphs
Wen, and R. K ¨otter, “Network monitoring in multicast networks using network coding,” in Proc.
Passive network tomography for erroneous networks: A network coding approach
For transportation of people, Twin Otter aircraft are used, generally starting from either Dumont d’Urville or from Mario Zucchelli station (Italy).
Astronomy in Antarctica
Site quanti fication may have t o take place through Twin Otter deployment of an automated observatory, such as using a modi fied, light-weighted version of the PLATO module.
Astronomy in Antarctica
HR uses the Otter theorem prover to prove the conjectures.
Discovery of Invariants through Automated Theory Formation
We will exploit the use of the Otter theorem prover in HR for the selection of the most general conjectures (heuristic SH3), while the Rodin toolset will be used to obtain the status of the POs after the candidate invariants have been introduced into the model (heuristics SH4 and SH5).
Discovery of Invariants through Automated Theory Formation
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