nightjar

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n nightjar mainly crepuscular or nocturnal nonpasserine birds with mottled greyish-brown plumage and large eyes; feed on insects
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Nightjar A goatsucker, esp. the European species. See Illust. of Goatsucker.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n nightjar A bird, Caprimulgus europæus, of the family Caprimulgidæ. The name is sometimes extended to all the goatsuckers or birds of the same family. Also called night-churr, night-crow, churn-owl, fern-owl, etc.
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Usage

In literature:

So there were nightjars here in India, too!
"The Research Magnificent" by H. G. Wells
Here toads and bats and owls and nightjars had come to drink, with rats and stoats who left their footprints in the mud.
"Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard" by Eleanor Farjeon
We did not reach the inn at Brockenhurst until about nine o'clock, just at nightfall, and a few minutes before that we heard a nightjar.
"Theodore Roosevelt" by Theodore Roosevelt
No moths are abroad yet; it is too early in the year for nightjars; and the owls are quiet.
"The Complete Essays of John Galsworthy" by John Galsworthy
She picked up the poetic story, Thao Nok Kaba Phuak (The Nightjar) that was on her bookshelf.
"Corpus of a Siam Mosquito" by Steven Sills
Kelaart's nightjar; swarms on the marshy plains of Neuera-ellia at dusk.
"Sketches of the Natural History of Ceylon" by J. Emerson Tennent
Professor Ansted includes the Nightjar in his list, but only marks it as occurring in Guernsey and Sark.
"Birds of Guernsey (1879)" by Cecil Smith
In the forest tracts Franklin's and Horsfield's nightjars make the welkin ring.
"A Bird Calendar for Northern India" by Douglas Dewar
Nightjars are as large as pigeons.
"Birds of the Indian Hills" by Douglas Dewar
That's the churning of the nightjar going up to Ballure glen.
"The Manxman A Novel - 1895" by Hall Caine
With these may be associated the swifts (which have such marvellous powers of flight) and the wide-gaped goat-suckers or nightjars.
"The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, September 1879" by Various
What about the nightjars you have seen hawking round the oak trees in Surrey, after sunset?
"Real Gold" by George Manville Fenn
NIGHTJAR, selection of a mate by the female, ii.
"The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex" by Charles Darwin
CAPRIMAsLGUS (Goatsucker or Nightjar).
"British Birds in their Haunts" by Rev. C. A. Johns
Cousins to the owls are the Nightjars, for example, the night hawk and whip-poor-will.
"Endurance Test" by Alan Douglas
And out of the distance the nightjar set again to its churring.
"Memoirs of a Midget" by Walter de la Mare
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In poetry:

The fretful nightjar stays its dismal tune,
The sunset dwindles, duskier grow the heights,
And the grey belt of the horizon soon
Is jeweli'd with twinkling lights.
"Four Miles From Any Town" by David Gow
Life said, As thou hast carved me, such am I.
Then memory, like the nightjar on the pine,
And sightless hope, a woodlark in night sky,
Joined notes of Death and Life till night's decline
Of Death, of Life, those inwound notes are mine.
"A Ballad Of Past Meridian" by George Meredith

In news:

To celebrate the DVD release of HBO's hit Prohibition Era crime drama, "Boardwalk Empire," Marian Beke - head bartender at London's 'speakeasy' style haunt Nightjar - has created a selection of 1920s tipples.
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