mortify

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v mortify undergo necrosis "the tissue around the wound necrosed"
    • v mortify cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of "He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss"
    • v mortify hold within limits and control "subdue one's appetites","mortify the flesh"
    • v mortify practice self-denial of one's body and appetites
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Mortify To affect with vexation, chagrin; to depress. "The news of the fatal battle of Worcester, which exceedingly mortified our expectations.""How often is the ambitious man mortified with the very praises he receives, if they do not rise so high as he thinks they ought!"
    • Mortify To be subdued; to decay, as appetites, desires, etc.
    • Mortify To deaden by religious or other discipline, as the carnal affections, bodily appetites, or worldly desires; to bring into subjection; to abase; to humble; as, to mortify the flesh. "With fasting mortified , worn out with tears.""Mortify thy learned lust.""Mortify , therefore, your members which are upon the earth."
    • Mortify To destroy the active powers or essential qualities of; to change by chemical action. "Quicksilver is mortified with turpentine.""He mortified pearls in vinegar."
    • Mortify To destroy the organic texture and vital functions of; to produce gangrene in.
    • Mortify To humiliate deeply, especially by injuring the pride of; to embarrass painfully; to humble; as, the team was mortified to lose by 45 to 0.
    • Mortify To lose vitality and organic structure, as flesh of a living body; to gangrene.
    • Mortify To practice penance from religious motives; to deaden desires by religious discipline. "This makes him . . . give alms of all that he hath, watch, fast, and mortify ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • mortify To destroy the life of; destroy the vitality of (a part of a living body); affect with gangrene.
    • mortify To deaden; render insensible; make apathetic.
    • mortify To reduce in strength or force; weaken.
    • mortify To subdue, restrain, reduce, or bring into subjection by abstinence or rigorous severities; bring under subjection by ascetic discipline or regimen; subject or restrain in any way, for moral or religious reasons.
    • mortify To humiliate; depress; affect with vexation or chagrin.
    • mortify In chem. and metallurgy, to destroy or diminish the active powers or characteristic qualities of.
    • mortify In Scots law, to dispose of by mortification. See mortification, 3.
    • mortify Synonyms To shame, chagrin. See mortification.
    • mortify To lose vitality and organic structure while yet a portion of the living body; become gangrenous.
    • mortify To become languid; fall into decay.
    • mortify To be subdued; die away: said of inordinate appetites, etc.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Mortify mor′ti-fī to destroy the vital functions of: to subdue by severities and penance: to vex: to humble:
    • v.i Mortify to lose vitality, to gangrene: to be subdued:—pa.t. and pa.p. mor′tified
    • v.t Mortify mor′ti-fī (Scots law) to dispose of by mortification
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. mortifien, F. mortifier, fr. L. mortificare,; L. mors, mortis, death + -ficare,in comp.) to make. See Mortal, and -fy
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—Low L. mortificāre, to cause death to—mors death, facĕre, to make.

Usage

In literature:

I am mortified to death.
"Damon and Delia" by William Godwin
Mortified that she refuses his honest vows.
"Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9)" by Samuel Richardson
I am not at all mortified, when sometimes I see my Works thrown aside by Men of no Taste nor Learning.
"The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3" by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele
Well, she is mortified, poor child.
"More Bywords" by Charlotte M. Yonge
A just reflection, to her dear friend, upon the mortifying nature of pride.
"Clarissa, Or The History Of A Young Lady, Volume 8" by Samuel Richardson
It was a sad history and mortifying to a great many.
"History of the American Clock Business for the Past Sixty Years, and Life of Chauncey Jerome" by Chauncey Jerome
I want to mortify the beggar.
"A Diversity of Creatures" by Rudyard Kipling
Antonyms: discipline, deny, curb, mortify.
"Putnam's Word Book" by Louis A. Flemming
The absence of precise information causes hesitation in condemning D'Estaing for this mortifying failure.
"The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783" by A. T. Mahan
But will the flesh be mortified by any real rough sackcloth and ashes?
"Lippincott's Magazine. Vol. XII, No. 33. December, 1873." by Various
I was extremely mortified to see that several of my guests had dozed off.
"The Sunny Side of Diplomatic Life, 1875-1912" by Lillie DeHegermann-Lindencrone
I was very much mortified, Sharlee!
"Queed" by Henry Sydnor Harrison
This naturally exasperated the blacksmith, who felt mortified at his failure to overtake the youngsters.
"The Young Acrobat of the Great North American Circus" by Horatio Alger Jr.
I was extremely mortified.
"Posthumous Works" by Mary Wollstonecraft
When she saw the other young girls in gayer attire, she would be mortified if she had any pride.
"A Little Girl in Old Boston" by Amanda Millie Douglas
They were intensely mortified at the defeat, which they were unwilling to acknowledge.
"Down the Rhine" by Oliver Optic
Here was an opportunity to indulge my will, not to mortify it; to make my love grow, instead of repressing it.
"In Convent Walls" by Emily Sarah Holt
Dan was mortified, and apologized for the failure.
"Watch and Wait" by Oliver Optic
The Court of Versailles was alarmed and mortified.
"Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3)" by Thomas Babington Macaulay
My undignified, unfeminine conduct stood out before me the moment he had spoken, in all its mortifying nakedness.
"A Romantic Young Lady" by Robert Grant
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In poetry:

By faith I keep my Lord's commands,
To verify my trust;
I purify my heart and hands,
And mortify my lust.
"The Believer's Principles : Chap. IV." by Ralph Erskine
How did his flowing tears condole
As for a brother dead !
And fasting mortified his soul,
While for their life he prayed.
"Psalm XXXV: Now Plead My Cause, Almighty God" by Isaac Watts
DID it not answer some benign intent
To mortify the flesh, and mend the mind,
The Sire of mercies never wou'd have sent
Disease, on any of our favour'd kind.
"Reasons To Persuade The Sick To Be Patient" by Rees Prichard
This bee an emblem truly is of sin,
Whose sweet, unto a many, death hath been.
Now would'st have sweet from sin and yet not die,
Do thou it, in the first place, mortify.
"Upon The Bee" by John Bunyan
Search thou thy conscience with the utmost care,
Strive ev'ry lurking passion to subdue,
Entirely mortify thy lusts by pray'r,
And fervently, for God's forgiveness, sue.
"Advice To The Sick" by Rees Prichard
SAID Neria, mortified at this reply,
Though he's a friend on whom you may rely,
Calista beauty has; much worth the man,
With smart address to execute his plan;
And when we meet accomplishments so rare;
Few women but will tumble in the snare.
"The Magic Cup" by Jean de La Fontaine

In news:

Prove me spectacularly, mortifyingly wrong.
Earlier this year, the transportation community was mortified.
In his sophomore feature, Ben Younger ( Boiler Room ) attempts to reinvent himself as a young Woody Allen, reversing the Woodman's age and gender dynamics but yielding mortifying moments all the same.
"When I saw what they were passing off as college, I was appalled and mortified," Bittel says.
Rita Ora mortified by wardrobe malfunction.
Paul Ryan's Debt to Barry Goldwater—Who'd Be Mortified by Paul Ryan.
They're ' Mortified ,' we're entertained.
'The Mortified Sessions' ( October 4, 2012 ).
Hokies' defense mortified by effort.
'Jon Reads the Paper Live on Ice,' ' Mortified Portland,' 'Bernie,' more.
Hilarious horror stories at Mortified .
Angelina Jolie ' mortified ' by Brad Pitt's mom: Daily Buzz.
John Mayer Mortified By Taylor Swift's Song About Him.
' Mortified ' making Bay Area laugh - and cringe.
' Mortified ' by state's history of poverty.
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