miter

Definitions

  • Try-Square.  Miter-Square.  Sliding-T
    Try-Square. Miter-Square. Sliding-T
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v miter fit together in a miter joint
    • v miter bevel the edges of, to make a miter joint
    • v miter confer a miter on (a bishop)
    • n miter a liturgical headdress worn by bishops on formal occasions
    • n miter the surface of a beveled end of a piece where a miter joint is made "he covered the miter with glue before making the joint"
    • n miter joint that forms a corner; usually both sides are bevelled at a 45-degree angle to form a 90-degree corner
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Additional illustrations & photos:

52 Miter 52 Miter
60 Double tongue miter 60 Double tongue miter

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Miter A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by bishops and other church dignitaries. It has been made in many forms, the present form being a lofty cap with two points or peaks.
    • Miter (Numis) A sort of base money or coin.
    • Miter The surface forming the beveled end or edge of a piece where a miter joint is made; also, a joint formed or a junction effected by two beveled ends or edges; a miter joint.
    • Miter To bevel the ends or edges of, for the purpose of matching together at an angle.
    • Miter To match together, as two pieces of molding or brass rule on a line bisecting the angle of junction; to fit together in a miter joint.
    • v. i Miter To meet and match together, as two pieces of molding, on a line bisecting the angle of junction.
    • Miter To place a miter upon; to adorn with a miter. "Mitered locks."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n miter A form of head-dress anciently worn by the inhabitants of Lydia, Phrygia, and other parts of Asia Minor.
    • n miter A sacerdotal head-dress, as that worn by the ancient Jewish high priest, or that worn by a bishop. The Jewish miter was made of linen, and wrapped in folds about the head, like a turban. Before the fourteenth century the miter in the Christian church was low and simple; but now it consists of a coronet, surmounted by a lofty and deeply cleft cap. The privilege of wearing the miter in the Roman Catholic Church was a concession of the popes, and was formerly exercised by cardinals and the higher dignitaries. Bishops and abbots (if to be mitered) receive the miter from the consecrating bishop. Three kinds of miters are distinguished: the precious miter, made of gold or silver plate and adorned with jewels, the auriphrygiate miter, and the simple miter of white silk or linen. The bishops of the Church of England wore miters as late as the coronation of George III., and some Anglican bishops occasionally wear them at the present day. See tiara, and cut under auriphrygia.
    • n miter A chimney-cap or -pot of terra-cotta, brick, stone, or metal, designed to exclude rain and wind from the flue, while allowing the smoke, etc., to escape; a cowl; hence, anything having a similar use.
    • n miter In conchology, a miter-shell.
    • n miter In carp.: A scribe or guide for making saw-cuts to form miter-joints.
    • n miter A combined square and miter-edge or pattern.
    • n miter Same as miter-joint.
    • n miter A gusset in seamstresses' work, knitting, and the like.
    • miter To bestow a miter upon; raise to a rank to which the dignity of wearing a miter belongs, especially to episcopal rank.
    • miter To ornament with a miter.
    • miter In carpentry, to join with a miter-joint; make a miter-joint in. See miter-joint.
    • miter In needlework, to change the direction of, as a straight band, border, or the like, by cutting it at an abrupt angle, sacrificing a three-cornered piece, and bringing the cut edges together: a term derived from carpenter-work.
    • miter In bookbinding, to join perfectly, as lines intended to meet at right angles
    • miter In architecture, to meet in a miter-joint.
    • miter In organ-building, to introduce one or more miter-joints into (a pipe), so as to adapt it to a contracted space: such a pipe is said to be mitered or mitered over.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. mitre, fr. L. mitra, headband, turban, Gr.

Usage

In literature:

Nor, Pantheus, thee, thy miter, nor the bands Of awful Phoebus, sav'd from impious hands.
"The Aeneid" by Virgil
Fearfully, the bishop emerged from hiding, his robes disheveled and his miter askew.
"The Mad King" by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Then propose it yourself, and though it were more useful than a miter, it would be rejected.
"The Social Cancer" by José Rizal
The miters will be formed later on.
"Wood-Carving" by George Jack
Initials, colored, 60; spacing and mitering of, 59.
"The Booklover and His Books" by Harry Lyman Koopman
The rails are not to be squared on the ends but are to be mitered each in turn.
"Mission Furniture" by H. H. Windsor
His wand is mightier than an episcopal miter!
"Under the Rose" by Frederic Stewart Isham
Miter the ends of these tenons.
"Mission Furniture" by H. H. Windsor
This moulding should have mitered corners as shown in the bottom view.
"Mission Furniture" by H. H. Windsor
The troops of one nation had their heads covered with helmets, those of another with miters, and of a third with tiaras.
"Xerxes" by Jacob Abbott
Make the other side of collar to correspond and sew up the mitered corners.
"Handbook of Wool Knitting and Crochet" by Anonymous
A clean, sharp meat saw or a miter saw with a rigid back may be used.
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
And Amenth's travelers sped the rounds: Issue material; Shear to size; Form on brake; Weld per print; Miter, drill, inspect, stock.
"Felony" by James Causey
Authority drops the scepter, the priest the miter, and the purple falls from kings.
"Walt Whitman" by Robert G. Ingersoll
Teach the mitered corner on paper only.
"Handicraft for Girls" by Idabelle McGlauflin
Miter Machines, and Wood-Working Machinery generally.
"Scientific American, Vol. XLIII.--No. 1. [New Series.], July 3, 1880" by Various
He was not awed by pageantry and pomp, by crowned Crime or mitered Pretence.
"The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 4 (of 12) Dresden Edition--Lectures" by Robert G. Ingersoll
The miter of the archbishop has not been deemed more sacred from scrutiny than the crown of the monarch.
"Sketches of Reforms and Reformers, of Great Britain and Ireland" by Henry B. Stanton
The Bishops are shaking in their miters.
"The Story of Francis Cludde" by Stanley J. Weyman
The ends of the braces are mitered, that is, sawed, like the corner of a picture-frame, on the diagonal of a square.
"Manual Training Toys for the Boy's Workshop" by Harris W. Moore
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In poetry:

the natural madness of the hatter.
And if the opera hats collapse
and crowns grow draughty, then, perhaps,
he thinks what might a miter matter?
"Exchanging Hats" by Elizabeth Bishop

In news:

If any of you have a mini miter box like I do.
Not feeling safe adding shims or wedges behind the saw, i made a miter box.
These are always Mitered Joints.
They gathered for a group photograph on a bitterly cold February day in western Kansas, resplendent in their bishop's miters and vestments.
DeWalt 12 Compound Miter Saw.
Here are some tips for mitering corners, joining strips and finishing a blanket in under an hour.
Mitered Corners & Invisible Joins.
Jennifer Keltner and Jill Mead give great tips for better binding with mitered corners and invisible joins.
Mitered Corners & Invisible Joins in the Better Homes and Gardens Video.
Learn tricks for fitting a lid, getting super-strong miter joints and adding a wood ribbon handle.
I was given a 45 degree lock miter bit for my shaper and I was wondering if there was any information on how to set the bit height for making corners that will fit.
For outside corners, a mitered joint is more attractive.
Glued up the Cherry into a panel, cut handles in the QSWO, and miter the corners.
The SH 1419 band saw has a swing head for mitering without material movement.
The tall fence and arm design on the miter saw gives it a 6 1/2-in.
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