mediastinum

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n mediastinum the part of the thoracic cavity between the lungs that contains the heart and aorta and esophagus and trachea and thymus
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Mediastinum (Anat) A partition; a septum; specifically, the folds of the pleura (and the space included between them) which divide the thorax into a right and left cavity. The space included between these folds of the pleura, called the mediastinal space, contains the heart and gives passage to the esophagus and great blood vessels.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n mediastinum In anatomy, a median septum or partition between two parts of an organ, or between two paired cavities of the body; especially, the membranous partition separating the right and left thoracic cavities, formed of the two inner pleural walls. Since in man these pleural folds do not meet, the term mediastinum is extended to the space between them.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Mediastinum mē-di-as-tī′num a membranous septum or cavity between two principal portions of an organ, esp. the folds of the pleura and the space between the right and left lungs
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL. mediastinum, fr. L. medius, middle; cf. mediastinus, helper, a menial servant, LL. mediastinus, equiv. to medius,: cf F. médiastin,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L., medius.

Usage

In literature:

Several lymphatic glands in the anterior part of the mediastinum contained black fluid.
"An Investigation into the Nature of Black Phthisis" by Archibald Makellar
A lymph gland from the region of the thorax behind or above the esophagus, or gullet (posterior, or dorsal, mediastinum).
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
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In news:

An unusual case of a ballpoint pen migrating into the parapharyngeal space and middle mediastinum.
In fact, only rare cases have been reported in the literature that exhibit such significant extension into the mediastinum.
This theory is consistent with the origin of the malignancy from sites devoid of normal synovium , such as the retroperitoneum, pelvis, head and neck, mediastinum, and pleural cavity.
Thymoma is the most common tumor of the anterior mediastinum and the most common primary tumor of the thymus .
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