masseter

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n masseter a large muscle that raises the lower jaw and is used in chewing
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Masseter (Anat) The large muscle which raises the under jaw, and assists in mastication.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n masseter In anatomy, one of the principal muscles of mastication, the action of which directly and forcibly closes the mouth. In man the masseter is a stout thick squarish muscle which arises from the malar bone and adjoining parts of the zygomatic arch, and is inserted into the outer surface of the ramus of the lower jaw-bone. See cut under muscle.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Masseter mas-ē′tėr a muscle which raises the under jaw, and thus closes the mouth.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr. a chewer, a muscle of the lower jaw used in chewing, from to chew: cf. F. masséter,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. masētērmasasthai, to chew.

Usage

In literature:

Masset is a fool, so also is Pelletan.
"Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician" by Frederick Niecks
At the same Salon in 1902 she exhibited the portrait of J. J. Masset, formerly a professor in the Paris Conservatory.
"Women in the fine arts, from the Seventh Century B.C. to the Twentieth Century A.D." by Clara Erskine Clement
Webb, Colonel Thomas W. Knot, George Masset, J. O'Sullivan, Douglas Taylor, James Bates, and Chandos Fulton.
"Fifth Avenue" by Arthur Bartlett Maurice
Man, 300, 1850 (Skittegats, Massets, Kumshahas, Kyganie).
"Indian Linguistic Families Of America, North Of Mexico" by John Wesley Powell
L. Masseter muscle, crossed by the parotid duct, and some fibres of platysma.
"Surgical Anatomy" by Joseph Maclise
Then the muscles of the cheeks and side of the jaw (masseters) are cut through and those connecting the jaw with the neck.
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
Finally there is evidence for an adductor between the temporal and masseter masses.
"The Adductor Muscles of the Jaw In Some Primitive Reptiles" by Richard C. Fox
Supra-angular and coronoid splint-bones serve for the insertion of part of the temporal or masseter muscle.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Slice 7" by Various
The masseter is an elevator of the lower jaw.
"Artistic Anatomy of Animals" by Édouard Cuyer
There is often a very much enlarged infra-orbital foramen through which passes a part of the masseter muscle.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
This is especially true of the zygomatic division of the deep masseter, which inserts on the angular process.
"Evolution and Classification of the Pocket Gophers of the Subfamily Geomyinae" by Robert J. Russell
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In science:

Masset & Tagger (1997) and references therein.
On the Spiral Structure of NGC 2915 and Dark Matter
The problem is similar to the dispersive sound wave problem of Masset (2000).
On Validating an Astrophysical Simulation Code
The second test is the one-dimensional propagation of a sinusoidal sound wave consisting of a density and pressure perturbation propagating at the sound speed, cs (Masset 2000).
On Validating an Astrophysical Simulation Code
We have heard that m = 1 perturbations are ubiquitous (Blitz), and new mechanisms based on non-linear wave coupling have been proposed (Masset).
The Central Regions of the Galaxy and Galaxies: A Brief Summary
The positive corotation torque might become large enough to change the direction of the migration of a planet to be outward (Baruteau & Masset 2008).
Type I Migration in Radiatively Efficient Discs
The Lindblad torque is due to the two spiral density waves excited by the planet in the disc (Ward 1986, 1997), while the corotation torque is exerted by the gas in the horseshoe region of the planet (Ward 1991; Baruteau & Masset 2008; Paardekooper & Mellema 2008; Paardekooper & Papaloizou 2008).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
The vortensity related corotation torque is small compared with the Lindblad torque (Masset & Casoli 2010; Paardekooper et al. 2011), on the other hand, the entropy related corotation torque can become larger than the magnitude of the negative Lindblad torque.
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
The corotation torque significantly decreases in an adiabatic disc after a few libration time of a planet because the entropy distribution becomes uniform within the horseshoe region (Masset & Casoli 2010; Paardekooper et al. 2011).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
The viscosity of a disc prevents the saturation of the corotation torque (Masset & Casoli 2010).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
It is noted that the small softening parameter leads to the strong corotation torque (Baruteau & Masset 2008; Paardekooper et al. 2010).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
Another torque acts on the planet by a gas element in the horseshoe orbit of the planet (Baruteau & Masset 2008; Paardekooper & Papaloizou 2008).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
The non-linear corotation torque comes from the outgoing boundaries of the horseshoe region, that is the separatrix (Masset & Casoli 2010; Paardekooper et al. 2010).
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
Masset et al. (2006) found the planet mass when the flow linearity breaks in a 2D simulation.
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
Masset & Casoli (2010) derived the analytical expression of the corotation torque acting on a planet by a disc with viscosity and thermal diffusivity.
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
Our numerical results are compared with the analytical expression of the corotation torque given by Masset & Casoli (2010) in Fig. 7.
Type I migration in optically thick accretion discs
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