mandrake root

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n mandrake root the root of the mandrake plant; used medicinally or as a narcotic
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Usage

In literature:

The mandrake very frequently has a forked root, which may be fancied to resemble thighs and legs.
"Flowers and Flower-Gardens" by David Lester Richardson
Of all roots, in German superstition, the Alraun, or mandrake, is the most famous.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
You brought me to life again with a mandrake root and spells; you can do anything you want with me.
"The Sky Is Falling" by Lester del Rey
This is briony-root carved like a mandrake into the shape of a man's legs.
"By What Authority?" by Robert Hugh Benson
The mandrake very frequently has a forked root, which may be fancied to resemble thighs and legs.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 1 (of 3)" by Isaac D'Israeli
His style shrieks sometimes like a ghoul tugging at the roots of a mandrake.
"Visions and Revisions" by John Cowper Powys
Of all roots, in German superstition, the Alraun, or mandrake is the most famous.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
His views are the outcome of a long and sluggish growth, and cling like mandrakes to the roots of his being.
"The African Colony" by John Buchan
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In poetry:

"Tear up the despot's laurels by the root,
Like mandrakes, shrieking as they quit the soil!
Feed us no more upon the blood-red fruit
That sucks its crimson from the heart of Toil!
"Humboldt’s Birthday" by Oliver Wendell Holmes
Poor Rizpah comes to reap each newly-fallen bone
That once thrilled soft, a little limb, within her womb;
And mark yon alchemist, with zodiac-spangled zone,
Wrenching the mandrake root that fattens in the gloom.
"Tree-Worship" by Richard Le Gallienne

In news:

Redgrave hammers home this mandrake-root imagery, and also overplays other elements such as the Donne poem and bits of Shakespeare.
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