malicious gossip

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n malicious gossip disgraceful gossip about the private lives of other people
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Usage

In literature:

As a child, he had been a tease; as a big boy, he had been a bully; as a man, he had become a malicious gossip monger.
"We Two" by Edna Lyall
They repeated with malicious intent the gossip that Grant drank.
"The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Volume One" by Abraham Lincoln
They repeated with malicious intent the gossip that Grant drank.
"The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete" by Abraham Lincoln
If he told her of the "town talk," he felt sure, knowing her, that she would indignantly refuse to heed the malicious gossip.
"Cy Whittaker's Place" by Joseph C. Lincoln
Alice Tynemouth was no gossip, and she was not malicious.
"The Judgment House" by Gilbert Parker
One of the curses of German towns is the prevalence of malicious and venomous gossip.
"The Days Before Yesterday" by Lord Frederick Hamilton
She scorned her distrust, scorned the malicious gossip that had excited it.
"The Crown of Life" by George Gissing
The Bosporus is the home of malicious gossip.
"In the Wilderness" by Robert Hichens
Malicious gossip of this kind, however false, serves its end.
"The Liberation of Italy" by Countess Evelyn Martinengo-Cesaresco
No English village is so full of petty squabbles and malicious gossip as a small Indian station.
"The Jungle Girl" by Gordon Casserly
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In news:

About 90 percent of everyday conversations are gossip — but it's not all malicious, a new study claims.
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