lumpfish

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n lumpfish clumsy soft thick-bodied northern Atlantic fish with pelvic fins fused into a sucker; edible roe used for caviar
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Lumpfish (Zoöl) A large, thick, clumsy, marine fish (Cyclopterus lumpus) of Europe and America. The color is usually translucent sea green, sometimes purplish. It has a dorsal row of spiny tubercles, and three rows on each side, but has no scales. The ventral fins unite and form a ventral sucker for adhesion to stones and seaweeds. Called also lumpsucker cock-paddle sea owl.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n lumpfish An acanthopterygian fish, Cyclopterus lumpus, of the family Cyclopteridæ. It is of uncouth form, with a high ridged back and a hump in which is concealed the small spinous dorsal fin, a flattish abdomen, a thick loose skin with a median dorsal and three lateral rows of spinous plates and small intervening tubercles, and a thoracic circular suctorial disk constituted by the united ventral fins, by means of which it adheres with great force to any substance to which it applies itself. Before the spawning season it is of a brilliant crimson color, mingled with orange, purple, and blue, but afterward changes to a dull-blue or lead-color. It sometimes weighs seven pounds, and its flesh is very fine at some seasons, though insipid at others. It frequents the northern seas, and is often brought to the Edinburgh and London markets. A Scotch name for it is cockpaidle. Also called lump-sucker, from its power of adhesion, and sea-owl, from its uncouth appearance. See Cyclopterus.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Lumpfish a clumsy sea-fish with a short, deep, and thick body and head, and a ridge on its back, also called Lump′sucker, from the power of its sucker
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From Lump, on account of its bulkiness: cf. G. & D. lump, F. lompe,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Scand., Norw. lump, a block; Dut. lomp.

Usage

In literature:

Down went the trap, an' up she come: not even a lumpfish or a lobser t' grace the labor.
"Every Man for Himself" by Norman Duncan
***

In news:

Valentine's Day recipes — caviar (or lumpfish ) dreams.
Clockwise from bottom are roasted salmon with green beans, rice pilaf, lumpfish caviar and chili mango sauce.
***