lisp

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v lisp speak with a lisp
    • n LISP a flexible procedure-oriented programing language that manipulates symbols in the form of lists
    • n lisp a speech defect that involves pronouncing `s' like voiceless `th' and `z' like voiced `th'
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Lisp The habit or act of lisping. See Lisp v. i., 1. "I overheard her answer, with a very pretty lisp , “O! Strephon, you are a dangerous creature.”"
    • Lisp To pronounce the sibilant letter s imperfectly; to give s and z the sound of th; -- a defect common among children.
    • Lisp To pronounce with a lisp.
    • Lisp To speak hesitatingly with a low voice, as if afraid. "Lest when my lisping , guilty tongue should halt."
    • Lisp To speak with imperfect articulation; to mispronounce, as a child learning to talk. "As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame,
      I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came."
    • Lisp To speak with reserve or concealment; to utter timidly or confidentially; as, to lisp treason.
    • Lisp To utter with imperfect articulation; to express with words pronounced imperfectly or indistinctly, as a child speaks; hence, to express by the use of simple, childlike language. "To speak unto them after their own capacity, and to lisp the words unto them according as the babes and children of that age might sound them again."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • lisp To pronounce the sibilant letters s and z imperfectly, as by giving the sound of th (as in thin) or Ŧh (as in this, either.)
    • lisp To speak imperfectly, as in childhood; make feeble, imperfect, or tentative efforts at speaking; hence, to speak in a hesitating, modest way.
    • lisp To pronounce with a lisp or imperfectly.
    • n lisp The habit or act of lisping, as in uttering th for s, and Ŧh for z; an indistinct utterance, as of a child.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Lisp lisp to speak with the tongue against the upper teeth or gums, as in pronouncing th for s or z: to articulate as a child: to utter imperfectly
    • v.t Lisp to pronounce with a lisp
    • n Lisp the act or habit of lisping
    • n Lisp the act of speaking with a lisp
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. lispen, lipsen, AS. wlisp, stammering, lisping; akin to D. & OHG. lispen, to lisp, G. lispeln, Sw. läspa, Dan. lespe,

Usage

In literature:

She very early ceased to lisp, and already in her fourth year she spoke with perfect distinctness.
"A Nobleman's Nest" by Ivan Turgenieff
She lisped the words in her soft, sweet voice, haltingly, like a little child.
"The Fire People" by Ray Cummings
Some, finger in mouth, could find nothing to say; others of more fertile brain, babbled childishly, or lisped in baby-talk.
"Patty's Friends" by Carolyn Wells
Only Wattie seemed to hear the stream rushing over the pebbles like a soft, lisping voice.
"Fifty-Two Stories For Girls" by Various
Yet the occasional lisp and the frequent roughness added a piquancy to her tones.
"A Coin of Edward VII" by Fergus Hume
He at first lisped and stammered and had a weak voice.
"Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 3 of 8" by Various
Ever afterward he lisped.
"Jewish Fairy Tales and Legends" by Gertrude Landa
Even lisping numbers 'come,' but mighty numbers are ordained, and inspired.
"The Crown of Wild Olive" by John Ruskin
I never dared lisp a word of it to the priest.
"Stories of Many Lands" by Grace Greenwood
Like Pope, he may be said to have lisped in numbers.
"A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year" by Edwin Emerson
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In poetry:

I called aloud. Aloft my child
I held, and nearer yet he came;
And when he understood and smiled,
My baby lisped his father’s name.
"The Living Picture" by Edward Dyson
I felt its pressure soft and sweet to feel,
That ever closer grew
When, at his feet in twilight, I would kneel
And lisp my prayers through.
"The Two Angels" by Alexander Anderson
What lovely things my ears have heard:
The thrilling song of happy bird,
A horse by anxious lover spurred,
A toddler's sweetly lisped first word.
"Song Of Lovely Things" by Wilhelmina Stitch
And as he lisped his evening prayer
He asked the boon with childish grace;
Then, toddling to the chimney-place,
He hung this little stocking there.
"Christmas Treasures" by Eugene Field
We scarce, O God! could lisp thy name,
When those who loved us passed away,
And left us but thy love to claim,
With but an infant's strength to pray.
"Hymn Sung At An Anniversary Of The Asylum Of Orphans At Charleston" by Henry Timrod
This is Being's mighty signet, then,
God's pure glass to angels and to men;
Each word lisped the Highest's praise to sound,
Ring in ring, united there is found.
"Book Of the Parsees - The Bequest Of The Ancient Persian Faith" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

In news:

In Part 1 of a series, Harry offers some basic advice about error handling for Visual LISP and VBA programming.
Then, he was the kid with a lisp who got picked on at school for wearing his sister's pink Pumas.
Using Cisco's OTV and LISP to Improve Application Availability.
LISPs power in manipulating complex lists of lists has also made it the tool of choice for developing symbolic reasoning systems such as OPS5 and PROLOG (both of which have many commercial and public-domain implementations).
LISP has potential to handle Web-facing applications using fewer lines of code, and with acceptable memory use and execution speed.
LISP Deserves a Fresh Look.
Actors need my lisp .
More prehistoric hijinks from Manny the mammoth, Diego the saber-tooth and Sid, the lisping sloth PG.
John McCarthy, the inventor of programming language Lisp and a pioneer in " artificial intelligence " technology, died Monday night.
A utoCAD's Visual LISP feature offers the ability to return the text stored in a TXT file when packaged in a VLX application.
In the 1950s the key innovations were programming languages such as Fortran and Lisp.
With his distinctive lisping style, he made his recorded debut in 1994 as a member of the Junior M.A.F.I.A.
This month the Lisp Listener will feature a program written by Dean Ritz of ExperTelligence.
Does your LISP go loopy.
The most popular ones are Visual LISP and VBA ( Visual Basic for Applications).
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In science:

This is a substantial, purely functional program | probably the flrst ever | and it is written in Lisp. A realist functional programmer might use Lisp or ML.
Logic Programming, Functional Programming, and Inductive Definitions
Many Lisp and ML programmers strive for a pure style, while many pure functional programs can be executed with reasonable e–ciency.
Logic Programming, Functional Programming, and Inductive Definitions
The Logic component can invoke arbitrary Lisp functions. A more fundamental problem is the treatment of uninstantiated variables in function calls.
Logic Programming, Functional Programming, and Inductive Definitions
We could say that Loglisp views the clauses as an inductive deflnition of solution sets; the Lisp half operates on lists of solutions from the Logic half.
Logic Programming, Functional Programming, and Inductive Definitions
An example: Parax “DLS” We give here a LISP form of the definition of the structures.
Interlingual Lexical Organisation for Multilingual Lexical Databases in NADIA
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